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Found 11 results

  1. We've all been talked into using foil for lots of campfire cooking. It's all fine and good if you gather your scrap foil, wash it, throw it in your forge, and roll it into sheets again. But most of us don't have time for that sort of thing. I've found there's plenty of situations where it (or any other utensil) is unnecessary as long as you can maintain a sizeable bed of coals. This is best done by separating the upwind and downwind side of the fire with a large log. The downwind side is for burning wood to make more coals, which you dig out under the log to bring over the upwind side. Things cook slower, but better. Corn on the cob. Do not shell! Rinse the husks lightly, and set the ears in coals to roast for about 1/2 hour. Rotate as needed. (P.S., if the fire is on a sand dune or beach, insert ears under the fire. The hot sand will speed cooking. Potatoes. Get a smaller brand and bury in coals. Three inch potatoes will cook in 1/2 hour. Dry-Rub roast beef. Lay on the coals, pull another 1/2 inch layer on top. Slice meat from edge to center as it cooks. Pastry dough. Store-bought? Bury tube in coals. The paper wrapping will burn away, and as it blackens, you can rotate it. Inside is yum! The alternative (especially useful for dough from scratch) is to wrap around a stick. But getting the thickness of dough correct and suspending it close above the coals is a bit tricky. Apples ... yes the thicker varieties will cook while buried half way in coals. Core them and and spices and a little water to the middle while they roast. Yes, every now and then a husk or one of your vittles will come alight, but that's half the fun!
  2. mrkstvns

    Grilled Panini

    Sandwiches make for easy campout meals, but when you turn your sandwich into a panini, it's elevated to a masterpiece of outdoor culinary art. The deli across the street from my office has a fancy schmancy panini press that they use to cook their paninis, but a scout can easily achieve the same effect with an appropriate rock. Look for a rock that's fairly flat, roughly sandwich sized, and about 5 pounds in weight. INGREDIENTS: Loaves of italian bread (or French bread) Fresh mozzarella cheese Sliced salami and pepperoni Pesto sauce Roast red peppers or sun dried tomatoes Olive oil INSTRUCTIONS Slice bread into thick slices. Spread pesto sauce on bread and layer with slices of salami, pepperoni and mozzarella. Top with red peppers and/or sun dried tomatoes. Close up sandwich with top slice of bread. Coat bread with a layer of olive oil. Lay a sheet of aluminum foil over cooking grate or grill and set sandwich on it. wrap rock in aluminum foil and set it on top of sandwich. When bottom of sandwich is an appetizing golden brown color, flip it over and do the other side (also with rock on top of sandwich). Enjoy the tastiest deli-fresh panini you ever tasted on a campout!
  3. While a guest on Saturday CBS This Morning's The Dish, Chef Greg Baxtrom talked about cooking in Boy Scouts and how it influenced him in his career. Here is link to video (at 1:38, interviewer asks about culinary Boy Scout training) https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-dish-chef-greg-baxtrom He also credited Lipton Onion Dip Mix in a March interview with Bon Appetit All the Boy Scouts’ dads would get into it and try to show off to each other. It started with canned beef stew, and then it turned into making your own beef stew. Then more like silver dollar cooking, where you take something like hamburger and put it in foil with some chopped onions and garlic and lay it on top of the coals and cook it, then open it up later on and eat it. Something tells me that a lot of the stuff we did, they don't do anymore. My dad is the kind of guy who is super hands-on. He's a carpenter, and I built a lot of things with him growing up. There's just this same craft element to cooking, too, and I responded to that more than building cars or a shelf or dresser or cabinet. But it was the same language. So on those camping trips, I made beef stew, soups, chicken noodle soup. One time I made a quiche, which my dad and brother thought was a little strange. When I would really try to show off, I would take the flour we brought, pancake mix, and other things, and I'd try to make some form of a batter. And then I’d pour it into a sauté pan with freeze-dried pineapple, set up a double boiler, and I steamed it. Yes, I made a cake out in the woods. The other campers would canoe by and I would very show-offy present my cake. We were all eating this weird dehydrated-pineapple upside-down cake. It was pretty good! ...more at source link https://www.bonappetit.com/story/lipton-onion-dip-mix
  4. Ok, this one is a puzzler. A first class scout goes to summer camp where the merit badge Cooking is offered. After five days of instruction, he is awarded the badge by the camp. The camp has a computer generated blue card that shows all the requirements checked off. The card is given to the troop advancement coordinator, who enters the earned merit badge into the Troopmaster software. The badge is earned, right? The Scoutmaster sees the merit badge earned on a list from summer camp, and realizes that there is no way the scout did the cooking requirements described in the book. He asked the scout how much cooking the scout did at summer camp. The scout says he has not done any cooking to get the badge. He has none of the paperwork or planning materials he should have produced, and cannot tell the scoutmaster much about the classes. The Scoutmaster wants him to take the merit badge again, with a regular councilor. I am both a Troop ASM and a cooking MB councilor. I can only think that the camp councilor went through the MB planning and cooking requirements and asked if the scout had done patrol cooking on a camp out, and then marked the requirements as done. But since camp is all over, the councilors have dispersed to their colleges for the start of the fall semester. The camp only has the records they submitted to us. I know that technically speaking, the scout has earned the badge, even though the scout has not really done anything much to complete the requirements. As a councilor, I cannot depend on the fact that the scout has done cooking on a camp out, since the requirements specifically state that cooking for other rank and MB requirements cannot be counted for the Cooking MB requirements. And I would not want to do that anyway, since I want the scout to get more experience cooking anyway. What do we do? The Scoutmaster either wants the scout to take the badge over, or informally do all the requirements for the badge again. I want make sure the scouts actually do the requirements as stated in the book. I will allow older scouts to use prior patrol cooking duties as long as they are well documented and the scout can thoroughly discuss each event with me. I also want the troop to not allow the scouts to sign up for stuff like this again. What do you think?
  5. My son recently signed up for the Cooking merit badge which is being offered with a group in my son's troop. I received an email from the organizer who told me it was only for First Class scouts and up and it would be "too hard" for him because it is Eagle required. My son is almost done with his Scout rank and has not had any merit badge opportunities yet. I read the requirements and didn't think they sounded too hard, especially since the troop expects him to do more difficult things on his own during campouts. Is this reasonable? Or is the organizer just trying to weed out the younger ones for his own convenience? I can't find anywhere that it says you have to be First Class to work on that badge.
  6. From Bryan Wendell's blog... Download and read this pdf. It is the Cooking requirements as of 1 January. Of note, from the blog:
  7. Here is an article from a Gannett affiliate on the 2016 USDA Nutrition Guidelines Here is the current USDA webpage on nutrition guidelines
  8. On our winter survival weekend this morning , I tried to cook an egg in coals (no paper cup, or anything.) to cook it in. I figured if I cracked the top, it would allow steam to come out the top. I then buried it in coals. It took far longer for the yoke to cook than I would have expected. Shells are great insulators! Any suggestions on how to do it better next time?
  9. KenD500

    Scout Cooking

    One of the other threads jumped into a tangent about food. Pancakes, steak, pb&j, etc. The theme for the month of October is cooking for my Troop. I noted in the last couple of camp outs that only 2 of the Ghosty Goats (younger guys) Patrol were doing the cooking. And that the Merlin (older) Patrol had planned brats for the 3rd camp out in a row. So we're concentrating on cooking methods for the month with the camp out being a cooking competition for Saturday supper. They have been creative in the past. Tang-flavored pancakes, "the Aiden Burger" (named after the Scout who invented it) - hamburger mixed with bacon bits, cheese & a1 sauce, etc. What's the most unusual or unusual sounding meal that your Scouts have come up with?
  10. We've had a lot of discussion about challenging Scouts to be more mindful and adventurous in camp cooking, and invariably, discussions like these lead into dutch oven cooking and challenging Scouts to use dutch ovens more. Great discussions but a piece of equipment that doesn't get much mention at all used to be standard equipment up until about the early 1970's: The Reflector Oven In my Troop, reflector ovens were automatically issued to every Patrol for every campout - we had to special request dutch ovens. Just about every Patrol used a reflector oven at least one meal a weekend - even if it was only to bake up biscuits or Pillsbury cinnamon roles. They started falling out of use as we transitioned from cooking over open flames to cooking over Coleman Stoves. I know that open fire cooking is much less common than it used to be but for those that have the opportunity to cook over open fire, have you tried any reflector oven cooking? Have you tried running a reflector oven bake-off? To expand a little, has anyone tried solar cooker cooking and what was the result?
  11. In the Forbidden Fruit thread the issue of food allergies and restrictions came up. This got me wondering: How do you deal with scouts with food or dietary restrictions in your menu/cooking process? In my unit we have found a few issues: Scouts that have religious food restrictions, usually to beef and/or pork. This is usually solved by simply substituting chicken as the protein. We don't have any strict vegetarians yet (except one adult) so we haven't needed to address that. If that were to happen we would work with the patrol (and the affected scout's family) to find recipes that were vegetarian to which a protein could be added for the rest of the patrol. Scouts that have allergies to one food (usually peanuts, dairy or shellfish). To manage this we make sure that the patrols all know what the menu restriction is. We encourage them to check the labels of all packages they buy for any indication that the food they are buying was processed in a facility with peanuts. We also work with the affected scout's family to get a list of brand name foods which they usually; this makes it easier on the grub master. We work with the scouts on their cooking process. For example, if you have a Jewish scout you don't go cooking the eggs in the same pan you just cooked the smoked pork bacon. These are the most common issues we have run in to. Anyone run in to any others? If so, how do you address them?
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