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Found 4 results

  1. I was just thinking about how the Scout Book app is a ways from keeping up with patrol-method requirements tracking. (E.g. PL's can't sign-off on requirements. Although they claim they may add the feature at some point.) Consider the following low-brow high-tech procedure: Each scout (or his parent) creates an account on the cloud (e.g. Google Drive) ... maybe with a folder labeled 'Rank Advancement '. The scout gives 'read' rights to the folder to his SM, advancement chair, and parents. After some requirements get signed off in his hand book, scout saves a photo of that page to his drive. The photo might be named 'Second Class', same as any previous photos for the same rank. That way, as he posts updates, the old ones are archived. He could also save photos of his participation diary, miles hiked, etc ... He could have a photo of his completed blue cards as well. In advance of his conference, the SM could bring up the scouts photo for that rank. He could then cross-check the book, if necessary. End of conference, he snaps a picture of the page and shares it with the advancement chair. BoR transpires. Advancement is filed by the current means. If the PL wants to plan activities, he can go through boys' pages and see if a few need something in common. Or he can look through everyone's picture of MBs and see if someone did something cool. If not, he could just ask at a meeting, but where's the fun in that? If the BSHB is lost, the leaders can rebuild from the scouts' most recent photos. Advancement track: done. Personal responsibility: taught. Teamwork: shared. Money otherwise spent on software: dutch oven pizza party!
  2. I'm spinning off of the other discussion about making the new Cyberchip requirements work for crossovers. The question is what can a scout learn via the existing curriculum that gets him somewhat prepared to help someone in need? And, what does a boy need to master to be prepared to help someone? I'm asking because I'm not involved in guiding scouts through the Cyberchip program, but I have scouts who are the "leaders" in their families in internet privacy/security issues. (That's good and bad.) Is this the 21st century equivalent of the old "how to help in case of a runaway horse" requirement in First Class first aid?
  3. My son recently signed up for the Cooking merit badge which is being offered with a group in my son's troop. I received an email from the organizer who told me it was only for First Class scouts and up and it would be "too hard" for him because it is Eagle required. My son is almost done with his Scout rank and has not had any merit badge opportunities yet. I read the requirements and didn't think they sounded too hard, especially since the troop expects him to do more difficult things on his own during campouts. Is this reasonable? Or is the organizer just trying to weed out the younger ones for his own convenience? I can't find anywhere that it says you have to be First Class to work on that badge.
  4. From Bryan Wendell's blog... Download and read this pdf. It is the Cooking requirements as of 1 January. Of note, from the blog:
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