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How To Be An Eagle Scout For DUMMIES

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  • #31
    I like the Ponderous speech. I read that the average Bald Eagle has 7,000+ feathers (who counted?). Maybe there can be a ceremony like some flag retirement ones:

    "The 1st Eagle feather represents the pure heart of the Eagle; purer than all the other scouts....the 1,223rd feather represents the match of freedom that every Eagle holds ready"...etc, etc. At 4 feathers a minute we can add over 29 more arrows. We can change into the Eagle Ordeal!

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    • #32
      >


      The youth application has a question for the parent signing the application: "Are you an Eagle Scout?"


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      • #33
        Look what I found!

        http://youngadults.about.com/od/collegeprep/qt/meritbadges.htm

        Thoughts?

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        • #34
          >

          Indeed. And it is as true as "Once a Pinewood Derby Winner, always a Pinewood Derby Winner," "Once an Arrow of Light recipient, Always and Arrow of Light recipient," "Once a First Class Scout, always a First Class Scout," or "Once a high school football star, always a high school football star," "Once a graduate of Big U, always a grad..." and so on.

          For brand loyalty and brand recognition, BSA may even tout a "Once an Eagle always an Eagle" ethos. And you'll always be an alumnus of where you went to college and grad school (and they'll find you, tell you how special you are for being an alumnus and what august company your alumni status places you in... and ask you to donate money). Organizations do that.

          BSA is not a religion. A scout is loyal but boys do not swear loyalty to BSA. BSA does good things but the good embodied in the Oath and Law exist independently of the club. BSA does not require a boy to swear any new oaths or obey any new laws as a requirement for awarding him the rank of Eagle Scout... just the same Scout Oath and Law he has followed for years. Special Eagle Scout Oaths and Pledges are superfluous.

          There is a kernel of truth to "Once an Eagle always an Eagle" but taking this phrase too seriously contributes to pathological Eagle idolatry that drives several negative trends in BSA.

          Eagle is not an end all be all status, and while it's an impressive achievement for a boy, it's not THAT impressive. It's not time to tattoo yourself and pinkie swear that you'll always consider yourself first and foremost, an Eagle Scout. Elaborate ECOHs and pathetically over dramatized presentations are unbecoming. As is taking too seriously this "once an Eagle always an Eagle business."

          As a man grows older, it becomes less and less seemly for him to make much publicly of boyhood laurels. (Some men don't even make much publicly of their adult earned laurels) Within scouting, it can be appropriate to wear the Eagle knot and "wear" one's Eagle status to motivate Scouts. But it's foolish for a man to believe that other men should be deferential to him or he to them according to whether or not they or he earned such a boyhood a achievement. And as for grown men pretending to have earned Eagle? That is, as remarked previously, odd.

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          • #35
            I think one shouldn't lump the Eagle Scout award, which takes multiple years to earn, and requires some serious effort, to pinewood derby car winners. But whatever floats your boat.

            Personally, I will always consider myself an Eagle Scout. I'm proud that I earned that rank, on my own initiative, with the support of some fantastic role models, with the help and company of some great friends. To be the rank symbolizes what I did in Scouting, and the ideals I learned and carry with me, and that, is once, and always.

            That being said, I think the program in general has a problem, it's easier to emphasis the rank of Eagle Scout, yet the values and experience are what truly matter. Devoid of those values and experiences, the rank is nothing.

            With all respect,
            Sentinel

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            • #36
              "the values and experience are what truly matter."


              Yes.


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              • #37


                Chapter X: How to criticize and belittle others accomplishments.


                "The optimist sees the rose and not it's thorns; the pessimist stares at the thorns oblivious to the rose."


                We got a great program here fellas and a lot of boys work hard to earn this honor. Let us not be so suspicious of others who attain something faster, or accomplish more then we could ourselves. Just because they do, doesn't mean they are cheating.

                Tim

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                • #38
                  Well said.

                  Chapter XXI. "How to criticize every other unit in your area as a parlor troop that produces paper Eagles while thumping your chest about how your unit is the only one with the rigor to produce true scouts worthy to be sons of Baden Powell."(This message has been edited by brewmeister)

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                  • #39
                    "I did look up one fellow in the NESA book, he wasn't listed, but I am not sure if that proves anything."

                    I think you have to pay or buy the book to be in it. I kept getting emails and letters from Council trying to solicit a donation to be in the latest edition of the Eagle book. I didn't pay. Wonder if I'm in it?

                    Of course I could be full of BS and not really be an Eagle This is the internet you can pretend to be anything you want!

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