Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tieknotsinlike50different

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM)

Recommended Posts

We don't use this POR because we haven't been able to find a functional reason to have one.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>>A JASM should be used as any other ASM would be used. As a mentor, guide and source of knowledge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:^)

 

Well, I guess that means the JASM doesn't do anything, because I am constantly instructing my ASM's to get out of the way and let the boys run the show.

 

In actuality, my older boys really don't want to be a JASM, they prefer to do functional, hands-on positions.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think often in troops, JASMs are poorly thought-out positions. Sometimes they're a place where a former SPL goes to die. :p Adults don't treat 'em like adults, and as jblake points out, they're not part of the regular "hands on" youth leadership team. Lots of times I've been on EBORs where JASM was listed as a POR, and the lad really admits it wasn't a great position of responsibility for him.

 

Yah, I reckon Eagledad has da right of it. A JASM should be part of the adult team. Meet with the adults, get an adult assignment. I think they can also be great at trainin' new adults who join the troop, eh? They should be part of the supervision of scouts, and some of the instruction and "roses & thorns" debriefs from an adult perspective. And whatever else yeh use ASMs for, eh? Budgeting, adult level planning, exploring options for new campin' areas, doin' SM conferences, goin' to district meetings, purchasing supplies, etc.

 

Beavah

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a JASM. It works well for us, but I think that's largely because we have a very remarkable young man in the role. I suspect it could really be a disaster with the wrong boy as a JASM, and I would approach the idea with caution. Our JASM provides peer leadership, will step in now and then if both our SPL and ASPL are absent (but only if asked), is the boy that the other boys turn to if they have problems or questions, etc. He does a lot of the same grunt work that any ASM would do, helping set things up, keeping records, etc..

 

I've never seen a teenager with as much ability as our JASM to provide leadership and mentoring without having to be the center of attention or getting everything done his own way. He's got a gift, that one.

 

-Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>>I've never seen a teenager with as much ability as our JASM to provide leadership and mentoring without having to be the center of attention or getting everything done his own way. He's got a gift, that one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jblake,

 

You are possibly missing a great opportunity at retaining the experience and influence of older scouts. No youth should be made a JASM just to make then a JASM. In our troop, the SM occasionally offers JASM to a youth who has been an outstanding scout. We follow the 16 year old minimum age requirement set by BSA. To my knowledge, the boys who have served as a JASM have been guys who served multiple times in APL, PL, ASPL and SPL positions and possibly TG and/or Instructor. They have usually attained Eagle and been active in our high adventure trips as well. They still enjoy scouting, but there is also a sense of having been there and done that and losing interest in doing the things that interest the NSP. They are young adults who are beginning to look at colleges, have girlfriends, drive a car and work a job to pay for all of those things. While still interested in scouting, they can't always be as active as the young happy go lucky younger boys. JASM is a way to provide a higher level of service and keep a boy active even longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Barry / Eagledad --

 

I couldn't agree with you more. As a parent, I feel blessed to have my boys in the same troop as this young man. I've known him since he was Den Chief for one of my boys' CS dens (and an outstanding den chief at that), and it's been a pleasure to watch him continue to grow and mature over the years. The boys look up to him, and also see him as a peer and a friend at the same time. I absolutely see that the boys in the troop strive to be more like him, and that's a wonderful thing.

 

We are very lucky.

 

-Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use JASMs. One is in charge of the Trail to First Class, and helps out the Patrol Guides. The other provides guidance to the SPL. One is an Eagle, the other is almost there. In the future I would like to have all of my Eagles serve as JASM (if they are not SPL), to build on the old concept of a Leadership Corps.

 

Not sure if that will work, but that is the general forward looking thought of the minute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When our very best Eagle Scouts no longer want to be SPL, I encourage them to pick a couple buddies and become a Patrol Leader for the younger Scouts.

 

We encourage our very best Patrol Leaders not to think about POR requirements, but to serve as long as they are their Patrol's best leader.

 

ASPL and JASM are just made-up positions, not used in Baden-Powell's Traditional Scouting because they are a waste of talent in a small Troop. As such they are the perfect face-saving promotion for a useless SPL or Patrol Leader when the Scouts realize the horrible downside of popularity contests :)

 

Kudu(This message has been edited by Kudu)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gold Winger writes:

 

Aren't all positions "made up"?'

 

As opposed to "essential."

 

The Traditional Patrol Method requires the Scoutmaster to train the Patrol's most responsible Scout how to take his Patrol hiking without adult supervision. Patrol overnights are the ultimate "Patrol Hike" (if only 300 feet from the nearest adult on a regular Troop campout).

 

As such a good Patrol Leader is the land equivalent of a "life guard" and far too rare to waste in the position of ASPL or JASM.

 

Kudu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudu,

 

You have a former SPL and Eagle who is 16.5 or 17. He has a driver's license. His parents didn't buy him a car, pay for his gas or his insurance because they believe he will become a more responsible driver and person if he foots the bill. That requires that he work in addition to school, scouts, church and any other activities he does. If he is lucky, his boss might let him have a weekend off so he can go on an outing. He might be able to come to about half the meetings if his job allows him a flexible schedule. He still has a lot to offer the troop, but his time is limited. Do you write him off or do you provide an opportunity to continue to serve and allow him to give back? He can do that as a JASM. An SPL who only shows up half the time and can't attend outings will only hurt the program. JASM made up? Maybe. Essential? Maybe not. Preferable? You bet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...