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gblotter

Minimal Effort Eagle

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On ‎3‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 9:14 AM, gblotter said:

The boy openly admits that as his motivation and says it without shame. 

I have to applaud his openness and honesty. On the other hand, I'm not at all sure that TG of a NSP is the best POR for him. My concern is that he will continue to be open and honest (with the new scouts) about his motivation for taking the position. 

If I were the parent of a new scout, I don't think I would be thrilled about having him mentoring my son.

 

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Posted (edited)

 

Quote
  • Lot's of applicants have Eagle Scout on their resume. Few have "Troop Guide", fewer still can write a good essay about it. But, those who do will likely stop an admissions officer in his/her tracks.

I don't know. I would be more impressed by a scout who was selected by his peers to fill an elected POR. A lot of times, appointed POR's are given to scouts who couldn't possibly get elected to a POR by the other boys. The boys know them too well. 

This thread is a case in point. Do you think this scout could get elected to a POR?

 

Edited by David CO

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1 hour ago, David CO said:

 

I don't know. I would be more impressed by a scout who was selected by his peers to fill an elected POR. A lot of times, appointed POR's are given to scouts who couldn't possibly get elected to a POR by the other boys. The boys know them too well. 

This thread is a case in point. Do you think this scout could get elected to a POR?

 

Up until the requirements changed (1980s?), OA Arrowmen were the most impressive Scouts in the program. I’ve said many times that they were the Special Forces of scouting.

And in our troop, past SPLs took the position of troop guide because they felt it was the most challenging and rewarding position next to SPL.

Of course a lot of that depends on the specific troop program. But the responsibilities of our troop guides required a great deal of maturity. I never saw a TG 14 or younger that was any good, and I was never less than impressed with TGs 15 and older.

Barry

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@David CO is right if indeed this boy has a toxic attitude. In that case apply the same rules to a different POR

If the boy has just been treating scouting as a side show, and is changing his attitude, he could wind up encouraging boys to not slack.

We can't tell which it is from this side of the Internet from @gblotter's troop. Only an ASM or a mature scout who knows the boy can help discern that.

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This 16 year-old Scout has the maturity. He could perform well as Troop Guide if he is willing to apply himself. Last night he accepted the TG POR with specific tasks and milestones. He is good at telling people what they want to hear. We’ll see how he actually performs.

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Toxic is too strong a word. Casual or uncommitted is a better adjective.

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9 hours ago, Eagledad said:

Up until the requirements changed (1980s?), OA Arrowmen were the most impressive Scouts in the program. I’ve said many times that they were the Special Forces of scouting.

It's not the requirements that changes, but the election process. Before the late 1990s, folks voting were limited to the number of names on the ballot; a one name to two eligible ratio essentially. Now you can write in everyone's name. A lot of Arrowman were upset when the current rules came out.

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6 hours ago, gblotter said:

Toxic is too strong a word. Casual or uncommitted is a better adjective.

You can only rarely work with a toxic attitude. It's a good sign that you haven't seen one in this scout. 

About half the time, I've seen casual or uncommitted scouts really grow from the challenges we've thrown down -- turning into intentional and dedicated young men. But you never know who will succeed until six months later. Still, it's worth the effort.

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23 hours ago, gblotter said:

You have grasped the situation well. And you mirror my thoughts on this. It is a fine line. Support the boy, but still require genuine efforts from him so that whatever outcome has meaning in the end.

I think that perhaps this is a situation where you can effectively use praise whenever you catch this boy doing something right.   Perhaps the boy would be encouraged by a kind word here or there and a show of appreciation for his participation and later,  contributions to the Troop.   Sometimes I feel like praise and thanks are under-employed tools that could be very effective if used more often. 

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