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Will BSA need to advertise for volunteers too?

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If one spends their whole life eradicating bugs, animals, weather, nature in general and such out of the house, why would anyone want to go outside and try and coexist with them?  Outside is a foreign concept to many in today's society.  If all the amenities of our society were to somehow come to a halt, most would die off rather quickly.

 

If it's too cold in the house, most people simply turn up the thermostat and never think of the other option of putting on a sweater.  When one is outside, the sweater is the only option.  For some, the lack of a thermostat is the end of civilization as they know it.

 

Are these our future leaders in what Scouting will be tomorrow?

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If one spends their whole life eradicating bugs, animals, weather, nature in general and such out of the house, why would anyone want to go outside and try and coexist with them?  Outside is a foreign concept to many in today's society.  If all the amenities of our society were to somehow come to a halt, most would die off rather quickly.

 

If it's too cold in the house, most people simply turn up the thermostat and never think of the other option of putting on a sweater.  When one is outside, the sweater is the only option.  For some, the lack of a thermostat is the end of civilization as they know it.

 

Are these our future leaders in what Scouting will be tomorrow?

You just described the average Bear leader. Burnout is the number one reason adults drop out of scouting, but looking a head at the Webelos program outline didn't help encourage the tired Bear leader to stay with the den. 

 

I know it sounds like doom and gloom, but I have been preaching the burnout problem for 20 years. National has responded by dumping more responsibility on Cub leaders.   

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I don't know if I would call it "burn out" in as much as I would call it "fear of the unknown".  Walking in the woods is as foreign to many today as walking on the moon.

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I don't know if I would call it "burn out" in as much as I would call it "fear of the unknown".  Walking in the woods is as foreign to many today as walking on the moon.

What I was trying to say is the burned out Bear leaders finds no encouragement to continue into the Webelos program because,  

 

""If one spends their whole life eradicating bugs, animals, weather, nature in general and such out of the house, why would anyone want to go outside and try and coexist with them?  Outside is a foreign concept to many in today's society.  If all the amenities of our society were to somehow come to a halt, most would die off rather quickly.

 

If it's too cold in the house, most people simply turn up the thermostat and never think of the other option of putting on a sweater.  When one is outside, the sweater is the only option.  For some, the lack of a thermostat is the end of civilization as they know it.""

 

Barry

Edited by Eagledad

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When I was teaching Webelos Outdoors 25 years ago, it amazed me the number of participants that stopped off at Walmart on the way to outdoor overnight training to buy a sleeping bag and tent.  I even had some drop out because they were expected to actually sleep outdoors overnight in that tent.

 

I was sleeping in my Civil War dog tent at the last camporee.  Two shelter halves, no ends, no floor.  Two of the boys came over to my tent and were all upset that the zipper on their tent wouldn't close.  They didn't know what to do.  Really?  How about just go to bed, they were talking to the wrong person as I threw the wool blanket over my head and rolled over to sleep for the night.  I never had a tent with a door and floor until I was in Scouts.  Then they had a door and no floor.  I was an adult in my 30's before I bought my first tent with a zipper.  I took SM Fundamentals sleeping in a canvas tent with floor and zipper.  I bought my first "real" tent with zipper door and floor when I was 45 years old.  It was luxury.

 

I tell the boys I sleep in open ended tents because if a bear comes into camp, I can get a head start on them running away.

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It is hard to recruit volunteers when you are also asking them to pay for the privilege. I wonder if the commercial would be required to carry a disclaimer informing the viewers of all the costs involved, much like a medicine commercial disclosing all of the possible side effects.

 

Great point. I was amazed at what some units charge. My unit just charges the recharter fee for adults. Some units charge that AND other annual fees for the unit. One local unit is $75/year for adults!!!

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Barry, thank you for sharing that commercial again. I hadn't seen it before. Effective? Yes.

Oh, you sure are welcome.

 

It's kind of the perfect commercial. The audience thinks they know the plot, so they patiently watch to the expected conclusion. Only to be surprised with an ending that drives the nobility of the message strait to the heart. 

 

Barry

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As for getting parents to help out, the ones that like the outdoors are already there. They just need the training. Okay, that's an issue.

 

Not only is training needed, but mentoring as well. and even more important, A WILLINGNESS TO LEARN! We have one parent who is a wilderness survival freak. Been to multiple survival schools and programs, certified to teach some of the levels with one program, etc. But zero experience as a Boy Scout or Boy Scout leader. Still in Cub Scout leader mode: complaining the boys aren't doing some things, jumping in and doing things for the boys, etc. Trying to talk top him is a chore as he won't listen.

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Retaining existing volunteers would be an easier approach. I left because of the piles of paperwork and redundant time wasting training. Those of you who have been around long enough know.

 

Y'all keep after it. I admire your patience.

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