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NYLT strip?

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1 hour ago, Col. Flagg said:

. I have head a few districts call their leader training "SEAL Training" and other such names to make it sound more elite than plain-old NYLT.

They should not be using SEAL Training as a title as the BSA already has an official course by that name.  It predates 1998 and stood for Sea Explorer Advance Leader Training. Then it became SEa scout Advance Leader Training. Link to an overview is here https://seascout.org/youth-training-and-education/seal/

SEAL pin can be found here: http://www.crventuring.org/Training/SEAL/

 

 

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BSA is confused. 

"The National Youth Trained Leader [That would be NYTL.] emblem [NYLT emblem shown.] is available for all leaders who have completed the Leader Training program appropriate to their positions. The emblem is worn on the left sleeve pocket flap. Den chiefs who have completed the den chief training conference may wear the Trained Leader emblem beneath their badge of office. "

 

This  garble while the "Trained" strip for Scouters who have completed basic training for their position is still the prescribed insignia. 

Trained strip with green lettering, No. 18064; [or] Trained strip with red lettering, No. 280. 

 https://www.scouting.org/home/awards_central/trainedstrip.aspx [12/11/2017]

https://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/33066_Section3.pdf

 

In fact, the "NYLT" strip is prescribed for Scouts and Venturers only.  They may also wear Trained Strip w/ green lettering, No. 280.  

https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/11/05/nylt-patch-offers-new-way-scouts-venturers-show-theyre-trained/

 

UNLESS I have convinced BSA to use "leader" to refer exclusively to youth and Scouter to Scouters.  :)  That seems unlikely.

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One advantage  of the NYLT strip if memory serves, is that once on the uniform, it stays on until they age out. It doesn't need to be worn in conjunction with a POR.

 

EDITED: Regarding the color of the patches, Bryan stated "here are two versions: one with red letters and one with green letters. Either may be worn with any BSA uniform. It’s the wearer’s choice, though he or she may wish to match other leaders in the unit."  https://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/11/24/when-can-adult-leaders-wear-the-bsas-trained-patch/

 

And I remember readiong about the color doesn't matter in TRAINING TIMES.

Edited by Eagle94-A1

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19 hours ago, Col. Flagg said:

Gotta be a regional or local thing. Never heard of any change to NYLT in my area.

I have seen the NYLT patches that look like the "Trained" patches. I have seen off-issue ones too done by local councils or units. I have head a few districts call their leader training "SEAL Training" and other such names to make it sound more elite than plain-old NYLT.

I'd be interested to see how/if these programs differ from NYLT. To carry on the metaphor I'd liken NYLT to advanced flight training. I'd call NAYLE more akin to "Top Gun" or "Red Flag".

In our council, SEALS (Scouts Excited About Leaderships Skills) is a precursor to NYLT (aka Top Gun). The SEALS program focuses on the 11 to 14 year-old scouts who predominantly fill PL roles, while NYLT is for 14+ (including Venturers) destined for SPL and VOA roles

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1 hour ago, Rock Doc said:

In our council, SEALS (Scouts Excited About Leaderships Skills) is a precursor to NYLT (aka Top Gun). The SEALS program focuses on the 11 to 14 year-old scouts who predominantly fill PL roles, while NYLT is for 14+ (including Venturers) destined for SPL and VOA roles

This would not work in my troop. We do a good troop leader training that fills the first training course role. Next is nylt at 13. It is more conflict resolution than leadership training. Nayle was more voa level imho. It doesn’t sound like nylt is the same in all areas. A good spl should be able to get a great deal out of nylt. Our tlt was awesome for pl training. But I guess some troops may not have that program. 

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22 hours ago, Back Pack said:

This would not work in my troop. We do a good troop leader training that fills the first training course role. Next is nylt at 13. It is more conflict resolution than leadership training. Nayle was more voa level imho. It doesn’t sound like nylt is the same in all areas. A good spl should be able to get a great deal out of nylt. Our tlt was awesome for pl training. But I guess some troops may not have that program. 

We also use the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops (ILST) training materials following each unit election, which provides a solid foundation for all younger youth. The PLC is required to attend ILST to be considered trained to position, but all are welcome. ILST covers much of the same territory as SEALS, but doesn't have the same immersion (SEALS is a weekend camping experience). We find that SEALS grads come back energized and ready to lead, and are often recruited to serve as staff for SEALS and District/Council camps. I agree with NAYLE being more appropriate for VOA, but it's not readily accessible to most in our area.

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4 hours ago, Rock Doc said:

We also use the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops (ILST) training materials following each unit election, which provides a solid foundation for all younger youth. The PLC is required to attend ILST to be considered trained to position, but all are welcome. ILST covers much of the same territory as SEALS, but doesn't have the same immersion (SEALS is a weekend camping experience). We find that SEALS grads come back energized and ready to lead, and are often recruited to serve as staff for SEALS and District/Council camps. I agree with NAYLE being more appropriate for VOA, but it's not readily accessible to most in our area.

So what’s different about that training than tlt or nylt. 

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NYLT is a week long course similar to WB. except there is no ticket. Rock Doc's program sound more like the old training from the 1980s, or maybe older, that I took to be "trained" as a PL. My course was TLT, but on a camp out.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

NYLT is a week long course similar to WB. except there is no ticket. Rock Doc's program sound more like the old training from the 1980s, or maybe older, that I took to be "trained" as a PL. My course was TLT, but on a camp out.

 

 

Thanks. What’s confusing me is that tlt is ilst. The. We have nylt and nayle. My district has something called oak leaf but it’s essentially ilst done with a larger group and pretty unfocused. I was wondering what was taught in each to differentiate between them. Nylt where I am is essentially conflict resolution and team building. Ilst by my troop teaches process and procedures for the troop roles. Nayle was mostly team building, servant leadership taught against self sacrifice. I’m just curious what these other courses teach. 

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40 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

NYLT is a week long course similar to WB. except there is no ticket. Rock Doc's program sound more like the old training from the 1980s, or maybe older, that I took to be "trained" as a PL. My course was TLT, but on a camp out.

 

 

Our NYLT program (http://topgun.mcc-bsa.org/home) is also a week-long camping experience. The SEALS program (https://sites.google.com/site/mccseals/what-is-seals) has been around  in our Council for about 10 years.

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2 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

Why national wants to standardize all the training courses.

I think they've been trying to do that for at least 50 years.

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3 hours ago, Back Pack said:

Thanks. What’s confusing me is that tlt is ilst. The.

"Junior Leader Training," in the late 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s was a week-long outdoor leadership and Scoutcraft course based on a B.S.A. syllabus and offered by council, perhaps through a district of the council.  Those learners completing the course received the hexagonal "Green Bar"/ JL [junior leader"] patch from National Supply Service. (Shown with Staff rocker.)

NhWHFbO.png

In the 1970s, B.S.A. (and the U.S. Army) adopted a national training program for youth leaders called, successively, Troop Leader Development  Conference,  Troop Leader Training Conference, and Junior Leader Training Conference,   These were week-long events based on teaching leadership skills (more and more modeled on the eleven leadership skills of the second version of Wood Badge) in a context of camping outside and Scoutccraft instruction.   Junior Leader Training Conference is often called "JLT," inviting confusion with the old JLT - Junior Leader Training - that was as much or more Scoutcraft as it was about Patrol Method and other leadership topics.

There was also an ode to Bill than ran for a couple of years starting in 1976, Brownsea Double Two - a throwback to the 1950s emphasis on Scoutcraft and Patrol Method.  When Bill retied again, that course was soon withdrawn.

GqU02tV.png

By 1981, "Troop Leader Training" was a day (or less) course offered by the troop to its youth leaders, followed by Junior Leader Orientation Workshop (J.L.O.W.), a day-long leadership skills course offered by a district.  The official syllabus for the latter was withdrawn about 2003 as it was based on the eleven leadership skills of the second version of Wood Badge that was being superseded.  A replacement syllabus was promised by B.S.A. annually for a while, then crickets.  That left no B.S.A. authorized training for youth leaders between the Scoutmaster (average tenure < yr.) and N.Y.L.T.  One might wonder if training is all that important to B.S.A.

At about that time, N.Y.L.T. was rolled out to present a week-long training course for a small minority of youth leaders that was consistent with the third version of Wood Badge, thus with Scoutcraft only incidental.

"Troop Leader Training" now seems to be an unofficial name used for Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops or some course created locally.

 

Edited by TAHAWK
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