Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I noticed the GSS does not directly address Lyme disease, or at least I did not see it. Lyme Disease has been identified in all of the lower 48 states but is most prevalent in the Northeast from Virginia to New England and in the upper Mid West. As we head into April, ticks, the vector that transfers the disease to humans become active and Lyme disease rates tend to go up. General information on Lyme disease can be found on the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/submenus/sub_lyme.htm .

 

While it can be prevented with some precautions, every year my employer has 2-3 employees contract Lyme disease associated with working outdoors in wooded or semi-wooded areas. While the disease can be treated with anti-biotics, if undiagnosed it can become difficult to treat and quite painful.

 

What do your units do about Lyme disease?

 

SA

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Educate. Every tick goes to the health lodge to be removed and logged in. A PhD Entomologist I work with said that the tick must be attached for 48 hrs in order to transmit disease (but I wouldn't bet on it), so daily showers and tick checks while at camp and timely removal is imperative. Another problem is that the young deer tick (the only species which transmits the Lyme spirochete) is almost invisible to the naked eye (about the size of a spider mite) and is often mistaken for a speck of sand or dirt. Of course, if you have a young female paramedic at the health lodge, the guys will go hunting for ticks just to get a trip to the "Doc".

 

Is the risk real? Absolutely...our SM contracted Lyme disease from our Council camp. But didn't know it until 6 months later when he started having joint pain. Not everyone gets the tell-tale "bullseye" rash.

Link to post
Share on other sites

scoutldr,

 

I agree, the risk is real and this disease is potentially more harmful to a young person still undergoing physical development, which is why I brought up the subject and am suprised the GSS does not address the issue.

 

Going to the clinic for tick removal may work in a summer camp setting, but ticks are most active in the Northeast in the spring and fall, when most troops are camping on their own. Unfortunately we do not have an attractive female medical person to bring along. One dad is an EMT, but not all that attractive.

 

We will have a short session prior to our April camping trip on the issue. It's something we havn't done in the past but given the number of cases I've seen the last few years, Lyme disease is a real concern especially in southern New England and the Mid-Atlantic States.

 

On the plus side more physicians in our area seem to be able to recognize the disease. Only a few years ago many cases were missed or diagnosed incorrectly.

 

SA

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Public Health Service campaigns in this area have been quite effective. Couple that with occasional news articles about Lyme Disease, and the end result is that most people in this area who engage in outdoor activities have become, at the very least aware, and some very knowledgeable about Lyme Disease. We do a brief refresher each time we go on an outing and remind everyone to check themselves thoroughly at the end of the day. Its not too unusual for someone to find a tick on their body, but it is very unusual for it to be the very small deer tick that carries the disease.

 

Those of us with younger children have no problem getting the child to submit to a thorough body check. I am curious how you get the older kids to do this?

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We very briefly had a SM who had, years before, simultaneously acquired Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever at the same time. Both were incorrectly diagnosed, despite the fact he new he had been bitten by a very large number of ticks while sleeping out under the stars. Therefore treatment was at best several weeks late. He still has certain medical complications from that come up. However, he did recover pretty well, since last I heard he was supposed to be going on an expedition to the Himalayas sometime.

 

Now you mentioned the, shall we say, cooperative tick checks. Most people I have known tried to avoid that. Enough Scouts are embarrassed about just using the open air camp showers. At camp the medics always suggest that it is best to have someone else check for ticks, but it is usually about that time that some Scout gets the inspiration for some rather unpleasant joke.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Does anyone have experience or information about the Lyme disease vaccine?

 

Our Council had several cases of scouts that were diagnosed with Lyme disease last summer. The suspected source of the ticks was the council summer camp.

 

I heard several years ago that the vaccination took several shots at specific time intervals and at that time it was only 50 to 75% effective. I would get the vaccine if it worked.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe manufacture of the lyme disease vaccine has been discontinued.

 

From the CDC Website:

 

" Lyme Disease Vaccine

 

A safe and efficacious vaccine was, until recently, available for protection from Lyme disease in endemic areas of the United States. However, the vaccine was withdrawn from the market by the manufacturer in February 2002 because of low sales and is no longer commercially available. "

 

 

SA

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...