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Is it incorrect to believe this?

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  • #16
    It just seems like when asked Why are you interested in working for the BSA or question like that you can't say I would like to help children. What other reason is there to be part of an organization that is made for kids if the end reason isn't the kids then I really don't understand the objective of the organization as a whole. The BSA isn't out to make profits. What am I supposed to tell them.

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    • #17
      "the purpose of an organization is often only visible to the ultimate customer. All too often the higher echelons forget that , and only worry about THEIR purpose in the organization."

      Go listen to "Alice's Restaurant and Massecre" , pay particular attention to the Group W Bench...

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      • #18
        I interviewed for a DE position a few years back in my home council. I was ready to put some opportunities aside because I really thought it was a great opportunity to do some good in my area, to give back a little for what Scouting gave me, the typical altruistic motivations of a 23 year old recent grad.

        So I went in there and had a perfectly lifeless interview with a perfectly lifeless suit, career pro who came off as apathetic, overworked, the whole nine yards. He asked me why I wanted the job, and I went on about my scouting experience, how much I was enjoying being an adult volunteer, how much I loved working with the kids. He stopped me mid sentence, leaned forward, and bluntly exclaimed "we don't work with kids. Get that out of your head now."

        I really should have just walked out then. I realize these guys have a job to do, but I really get the impression if you truly love the BSA, the program, the possibilities for kids, you're better off living your life and finding a local troop than spending your time in a suit talking financials and quotas. Spend your weekends camping, not wining and dining donors. I feel like the worst place for an Eagle Scout is worrying about FOS numbers and unit retention.

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        • #19
          Ummm.

          My last DE had the typical extensive list of Scouting activities, including multiple summers staffing Scout camp.

          After a year as DE, the council fired a Camp Director not long before summer camp began. Our DE took his place, and served three summers as Camp Director.

          I guess his Scouting background proved to be useful to the council.

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          • #20
            Seatle: Saved a whole 'nother salary, too.

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            • #21
              Bando

              That scouting pro who interviewed gave you a load of crap!
              In my first year as a DE I was asked to be a WDL for the Cub Day Camp in one of my districts since their WDL was hospitalized, and it was the best PR move I ever made. My February's were always booked with Blue and Golds. I was invited to every ECOH in both districts. I organized the career speakers at the local high schools for the Explorer program, and was ASKED by the school districts to give a BSA program presentation to the youth every year, along with my GSUSA counterpart.

              I was a camp director for 3 years with a great staff each time. There were also many other opportunities in working directly with the youth and volunteers. Still I had my FOS and unit creation responsibilities, was the OA staff advisor, JLT staff advisor,as well as giving countless scouting presentations at lodges, Kiwanas, Rotary, etc.

              It was a lot of hard work and long hours but I was made to feel a close part of my districts scouting programs. As a result my FOS goal was always exceeded as were my numbers with the help of some very grateful volunteer scouters. The only real problem with being a DE in my experience was that three SE's came and went in a period of three years all of whom left the council much worse off financially and in deeper debt until it was merged by National's directive, several years later after I had left, for financial insolvency.

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              • #22
                BP,

                Depends on the SE and/or DFS. My DFS tried to minimize the DEs from being "in the field," even if we were doing it voluntarily. I vividly recall my DFS telling me point blank that "you don't need to play Indian" in regards to me attending OA events. I had certs that BSA would accept to do some aquatic activities, and I was scheduled to work at the council's HA sea base, which was in the last SCOUTING MAGAZINE btw, only to have it canceled at the last minute. The CD was ticked off big time on that one.

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                • #23
                  Eagle92

                  While you might be right, in my case it was IMO what helped me more than exceed all my goals, especially in money and numbers, every year for five years. All of my SE's had no problem with me being in the field and why they asked me to be CD for three years, appointed me staff advisor for the OA and JLT, and why all the schools in my districts gave me an open door to giving presentations to their youth. Being in the field also gave me the very strong support I received from the volunteers in my districts. Even though my DE style may not have been the SOP in the BSA none of my SE's or FD's could ever deny its effectiveness. In fact when I decided to leave the profession my then SE offered me the FD position or a transfer to any other council I wanted, so I would have to consider my career as a professional scouter as a complete success.

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                  • #24
                    One of my personal goals as a district officer is to relieve the DE from doing as many things as I can. My preferred goal would be to have volunteers doing EVERYTHING. We're a loooong way from that, though.

                    We have a hard working DE, and very likely he works too much. He's a young guy of 23 or so, and I figure he ought to be out there finding a cute young girl to make Tiger Cubs with.

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                    • #25
                      I am 24 years old and I dont mind working long hours. I went to college to get into a business type field doing work alot like this. I would much rather do this then spend the same hours standing in one place pushing a button at the factory going home everynight hating what I do. The pay isnt as good as the factory but money isnt everything.

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