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Our pack pays for the leaders to attend training.

Essentially the leaders are requested to attend, complete it and submit a photo of their training cert and we will reimburse them (had to do this after a swathe of them years ago blew it off and we couldn’t get refunds)

Now we need leaders to attend Balloo  and Univ of Scouting (new crop of leaders) and there is sooo much whining about it.  We even include their lunch for Univ of Scouting.  
 

who has a winning idea to get the grown ups to go?

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I found that giving them a purpose helps. From what I've seen from other units, a leader gets trained and then what they learned remains with the card they hold and doesn't go any further. Whenever I have a leader, or trying to encourage a leader, to go to training, I have them use what they learned right away. Whether it's leading a segment with the scouts or even the adult parents. 

We, too, pay for our leaders but that's never going to be enough if I don't tell them how that training will benefit them, the unit, and how they are going to be using it soon after the training is completed. Another thing we do is we sign up and pay for the leaders at the meeting rather than rely on them to do it themselves. This usually eliminates excuses like "I forgot". 

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Just nag them. Every time they ask a simple question that is addressed in training point out how they would already know it if they did training. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

It would be nice if the district or council set up a parallel activity for scouts while their parent is being trained.

Any onsite training, round table, etc. is a tough sell to my wife. Most parents either need to be working, taking care of the house, or spending time with their kids. The only reason I'm talking about Scouts online with internet friends right now is because everyone in my household is still sleeping.

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On 1/27/2024 at 7:05 AM, BetterWithCheddar said:

It would be nice if the district or council set up a parallel activity for scouts while their parent is being trained.

Any onsite training, round table, etc. is a tough sell to my wife. Most parents either need to be working, taking care of the house, or spending time with their kids. The only reason I'm talking about Scouts online with internet friends right now is because everyone in my household is still sleeping.

During our district Klondike Derby, I offered a one hour training class to adults, through five sessions during the day, while their Scouts were making the rounds to their stations.  Got 21 adult students, and great feedback on offering it while they were already in attendance of another event that did not require their participation or constant supervision...

(in a warm place, btw ;P)

Edited by InquisitiveScouter
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3 hours ago, InquisitiveScouter said:

During our district Klondike Derby, I offered a one hour training class to adults, through five sessions during the day, while their Scouts were making the rounds to their stations.  Got 21 adult students, and great feedback on offering it while they were already in attendance of another event that did not require their participation or constant supervision...

(in a warm place, btw ;P)

That is the way. 🙂

Below are two hypothetical conversations between my wife and I:

 

Conversation #1:

BwC: I need to go to camp on Saturday for some adult leader training.

Mrs. BwC: I don't think so.

 

Conversation #2:

BwC: I need to go to camp on Saturday for some adult leader training, but they have some outdoor activities planned for the boy.

Mrs. BwC: OK, when should I expect you home?

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On 12/27/2023 at 1:47 PM, Momleader said:

who has a winning idea to get the grown ups to go?

Who cares? Go to the local bait shop, get a dozen nightcrawlers, take them to "training." Make the night crawlers sit through the entire training program. CAUTION: open the lid so they can hear.  (No bathroom breaks.) Present them to the untrained adults at the next troop meeting(s) advising the untrained adults present that their contribution to the education of their children is equivalent to that of the "trained" nightcrawlers.

There is an anecdote of President Lincoln, in the presence of some Senator, was "blacking (polishing his boots.) The Senator, watching Lincoln polishing his own boots, remarked, "President Lincoln, you polish your own boots?" (Thinking, how demeaning for the President of the United States to have to polish his own boots. (Has he not a servant?))

Lincoln replied, "Yes, Senator, I polish my own boots.  Whose boots do you polish?"

Translation:  If parent does not parent their own child, someone else will do it-and just who will that be? (And why would a responsible parent leave such an important task to CHANCE?)

Ask parents if they have the wits of a nightcrawler…and if not, do they have any nightcrawlers they'd recommend to take over care of their children…

Leadership is not about shaming parents regarding their responsibilities. But about drawing parents' attention to the good they can do to raise, educate, their children.

Somewhere, in my personal notes, as my last child attained age and moved out, I wrote, "My time of pouring me into you is over." And it has been so. The window for a parent to inculcate the parent's knowledge, ethics, principles, ethos, traditions, family history, etc…, ends much more quickly than one can imagine.

On 12/27/2023 at 1:47 PM, Momleader said:

Our pack pays for the leaders to attend training.

I've never let my unit pay for anything relating to my participation as an adult. I am there for my children and as an adult leader for all the other Scouts. It is my contribution  for my community. I purchased top quality gear for our Philmont Treks all at my expense, and I own it, and most importantly, I have custody of it-I wanted to KNOW the status of that gear at all times. A gear failure on the trail is a huge issue. Even at that, $400 total, our crews had no gear issues.

There is this concept, some make it their religion, Be Prepared.

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My take on how to get adults to do things hinges on viewing life through the lens of three virtual bank balances: Time, Money, and Social currencies. You may have to draw down the balance of all three accounts for certain activities.

Everyone has different balances in these accounts. Some may have more Money but less Time, enabling them to financially support others. Those with more Time but less Money invest their time to help without incurring costs. Social currency is spent when actions create hardships for those close to you. Balances in these accounts can only be changed or restored through some form of investment or sacrifice.

To maximize adult participation, minimizing spend from all three accounts is crucial. Activities aligned with existing commitments, avoiding charges, and minimizing additional time investment create a winning combination. Adding to the balance through good planning would be a MAJOR victory, although I'm pressed to give a good example of how.  Maybe having training at a destination non-scouting members of a family would enjoy spending the day/weekend?

The cost from these accounts is personal and highly variable.  You can't assume others can shoulder the same burden from any given account as you can.  And even if they could, we should always be "thrifty" anyway and try to minimize the spend.  For example, an activity falling on Mother's Day could be a major Social Currency withdrawal for some families, valuing togetherness on that day. Meanwhile, others might see it as a day of rest, making an empty house a net deposit in the Social Currency account. Understanding these dynamics helps tailor activities for broader participation.

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