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Bird Study MB and Climate Change and Outdoor Code


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On 10/5/2023 at 10:58 PM, yknot said:

Birdcast

Oh, thank you so much for this.  I had no idea how many birds were migrating overhead. I've seen the warblers move through in the Spring, but no sense of the number of birds. And the hummingbirds who arrive and KNOW where the feeder was last season (me being late to put one up this season) they circle the corner of the house where the feeder was hanging in the Fall. They remember.  Smart critters. And the ducks, and geese. Aways heard geese flying in the Fall at night. Just no sense of the vast numbers migrating.  And an article about the number of birds dying in Chicago during the migration.

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I don't want to hijack the thread, and maybe this discussion about the Outdoor Code belongs in a separate thread. Our troop recites the Outdoor Code only rarely, but when they do they keep their

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"No other explanation" does not equal cause.  It is irresponsible and illogical to make such a leap to say measured changes in climatic conditions caused changes in bird species.  They observed t

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You're welcome. Migration is often thought of as a daytime event, which it is for many species, especially the very visible raptors, or because of what is seen during local fallouts and daytime feeder visits. Songbird migration, though, at least on the wing, is largely a nighttime phenomenon. Hopefully things like Birdcast will help build an appreciation for what is overhead on many nights in the spring and fall. The recent full moons in the northeast have been great for showing this to kids.

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9 hours ago, yknot said:

You're welcome. Migration is often thought of as a daytime event, which it is for many species, especially the very visible raptors, or because of what is seen during local fallouts and daytime feeder visits. Songbird migration, though, at least on the wing, is largely a nighttime phenomenon. Hopefully things like Birdcast will help build an appreciation for what is overhead on many nights in the spring and fall. The recent full moons in the northeast have been great for showing this to kids.

Unbelievable. Incredible. Had no idea such a site existed.

I have some vague recollection of a bird which was named the "Tennessee or Carolina... or ??? Warbler) back in Audubon's time, the "joke" being that the bird was "collected" in the state of its name, but the bird never resided there-just migrating through.

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"Antibodies found in early results of a historic new vaccine trial are expected to give endangered California condors at least partial protection from the deadliest strain of avian influenza in U.S. history.

The California condor is the only bird species in the U.S. that has been approved for the new emergency-use vaccine, which was administered this summer to condors bred in captivity during a trial at the Los Angeles Zoo, the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and the Oregon Zoo."

More at source:

https://apnews.com/article/california-condors-vaccine-avian-influenza-65e27a0751666eee0e3ab3b82ae18251

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North Dakota:

Jackson Sperry's Eagle Scout project will provide safe nests for mallard ducks.

Sperry and fellow scouts are using 14-gauge mesh wire rolled into circles, and clipper together with an insulating straw wall to produce a nest.

(When completed)... “We’re going to wait until the water freezes over so we can walk on top of the ice, and then drill a hole. And then use the pole driver and drive it into the ground. And then connect the T-pole on top with the nest portion already in,” said Jackson Sperry with Troop 123.

More at source including photo:

https://www.kfyrtv.com/2023/12/03/bismarck-scout-troop-working-project-mallard-birds/

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Microsleeping...

For sleepy scouters, nodding off can be inconvenient—say, during a scoutmaster conference—or even downright dangerous, say while sitting around a campfire. :)   ... "But for Antarctica’s nesting chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarcticus), these seconds long bits of shuteye known as “microsleeps” may help them survive. These mininaps net the birds about 11 hours of sleep per day, potentially offering them a way to rest while remaining vigilant over their eggs and chicks, researchers report today in Science. The work could shine a light on how different animals adapt their dozing to cope with stressful circumstances."

"Penguins live in a high-stress environment. They breed in crowded colonies, and all their predators are there at the same time," said Daniel Paranhos Zitterbart, who studies penguins at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts and was not involved in the study.

Microsleeping is "an amazing adaptation" to enable near constant vigilance, he said.

Sources:

https://www.science.org/content/article/antarctic-penguin-sleeps-11-hours-day-few-seconds-time

https://www.smdailyjournal.com/news/national/penguin-parents-sleep-for-just-a-few-seconds-at-a-time-to-guard-newborns-study/article_94cbd4c6-9092-11ee-ac98-4343b405b629.html

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  • 2 months later...

Wildlife photographer "Daniel Dencescu spent hours following the starlings around the city and suburbs of Rome, Italy.

Finally, on the cloudless winter's day, the murmuration, swirled into the shape of a giant bird."  (Perhaps communicating to photographer to stop following them? :unsure: )

He was a finalist in Wildlife Photographer of the Year People's Choice Award competition.

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More on "The Secrets and Science Behind Starling Murmurations". 

https://animals.howstuffworks.com/birds/starling-murmurations.htm

An interesting read on the study of murmurations and application to animations (bats in Batman Returns) and swarm robotics (drones).

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