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5thGenTexan

Tree Straps

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I understand why tree straps are used for a hammock.  Question for the day...  are tree straps needed to tie something like a ridgeline for a shelter?

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It depends on the weight of the tarp. If you are sheltering a single person (e.g. covering a hammock) and the ridge line is a reasonably thick rope with a bit of play, probably not.

If you are sheltering a large party, then even if you used straps, they could dig in, so you might find yourself putting something under the ropes to anchor the strap.

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2 hours ago, qwazse said:

It depends on the weight of the tarp. If you are sheltering a single person (e.g. covering a hammock) and the ridge line is a reasonably thick rope with a bit of play, probably not.

If you are sheltering a large party, then even if you used straps, they could dig in, so you might find yourself putting something under the ropes to anchor the strap.

 

I have Webelos this year.  We are going to go beyond whats in the book. (not adding to requirements, just introducing additional skills).  I want to give them a length of rope to keep and bring to Den Meetings to practice every week.  At some point in that they will learn to tie off for something like a ridgeline.  I am just wondering if I make a statement like you never tie off a tree unless you have straps.

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It may depend where you're at. We once went to a county campground and nothing could be tied to trees. The reason was it was a high use area and, just like staying on trail, they didn't want wear and tear on the trees from every camper tying up dish nets.

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You shouldn't need straps. Guylines work just fine. There are many, many ways to set up a tarp from using trekking poles, sticks, trees or some combination. You'll need one or more of these depending on how you're setting up your tarp. Half pyramid can use just one. A frame needs two and so on.

Unless you have some giant, heavy tarp, there's no need for straps.

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If you are looking to say "always" or "never" then the important thing is to teach the scouts to be observant. And since your assumption (a good one) is that they will have some rope, use it to work in some real outdoor ethics. When they tie off to a tree teach them to ask:

Is it alive?

Is my rope harming it?

What can I do to reduce that harm?

Generally, there will be nothing to do if they are hanging a tarp.

Otherwise they may need to loosen their knot, open their loop and slip sticks between the rope and bark. It could mean swapping out Kevlar, if they have it.

It's more important to teach them to "always" inspect their work and "never" hesitate to make necessary adjustments.

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