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Anyone Do the Philmont PSR-PASS Adult Orientation

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Can anyone tell me about the long weekend orientation for adult leaders at Philmont?  I'm looking for an overall impression and did they require you to use their gear?

 

Thanks!

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I did PASS with a few adults when I was a jasm. It’s essentially like the ranger training you get at Philmont. I didn’t find it worthwhile because it basically repeated the stuff on the Philmont YouTube channel about gear prep and usage. Since my troop was big on backpacking much of the training was redundant to what we already knew.

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I did PASS with a few adults when I was a jasm. It’s essentially like the ranger training you get at Philmont. I didn’t find it worthwhile because it basically repeated the stuff on the Philmont YouTube channel about gear prep and usage. Since my troop was big on backpacking much of the training was redundant to what we already knew.

 

Did you do this at Philmont or at a location near you?  They have an orientation thing at an office in my area.

 

One of the other assistant scoutmasters and I saw this as a chance to get familiar with Philmont and being a mini vacation away with a chance to camp without the scouts.  :)

 

With airfare less than $200 to Denver, share a rental car it wouldn't be too expensive, too.

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Did you do this at Philmont or at a location near you?  They have an orientation thing at an office in my area.

 

One of the other assistant scoutmasters and I saw this as a chance to get familiar with Philmont and being a mini vacation away with a chance to camp without the scouts.  :)

 

With airfare less than $200 to Denver, share a rental car it wouldn't be too expensive, too.

My dad went to the local one as well. Said it saved him the cost of going to Philmont. If you want it as a short get away then that’s cool. You’ll just day hike to a nearby camp, most likely something on the south range like Bachache Springs or something on the Rayado River valley. I found it redundant since I already knew the stuff, had seen the online videos and had already trained on these skills with my crew and didn’t want to spend a weekend doing something I already knew. When we did ranger training on my first Trek it was identical.

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It is well worth attending the course at Philmont, especially since you are within driving distance.   First, you get a small experience of an actual Philmont trek.   Go through pack shakedown with rangers, load up your pack, be driven to a turnaround, then hike on actual Philmont trails to do training at an actual Philmont backcountry camp.   Usually it is the Lover's Leap camp.  Trek group stops at Lover's Leap.  (Look it up.)   You have to be there to experience it.   Our group had ten scouters during our PSR-PASS weekend.  Finish up the evening sitting around a campfire talking about Philmont and Scouting with other Scouters at Philmont.

 

Three day training goes through everything your crew will do during the first three days at Philmont.   You will go through every area of the Camping Headquarters:  Welcome center, logistics, equipment warehouses, food pickup, storage, post office, etc.   Meet with the head of the infirmary and tour it, gaining an understanding of what happens if there is a medical issue while at Philmont.  Great information to give your parents to let them know how their kids will be cared for.  You will be familiar with what your crew does once you arrive at Philmont.

 

On the trail you eat Philmont trek food.   You get to experience what it is like when you take the entire crew.   Philmont cooking methods, cleanup, sump use.    Also have to follow all Bear procedures to keep your group safe.  Establish Bearmuda Triangle.  Experience Philmont temperature changes. 

 

Sleep in Philmont tents.  Crew splits up crew gear.

 

Directly interact with two Philmont rangers continuously from Friday until Monday morning who give their perspective on what it takes to get a crew ready for a trek.   They share their experiences on the trail with various crews during the past summer.  They share their love of Philmont -- while at Philmont with you on the trail in a relaxed atmosphere.

 

Bear Bags - how can you really experience this unless you are there at the campsite going through the difficulty of actually putting up the bags.   Took our group over an hour which is a similar experience to what the boys get to experience.

 

Experience altitude adjustment at 6,500 feet and what it feels like with loaded pack heading out on the trail.

 

My PASS group had Scouters from around the US getting ready for their treks the next year, Colorado, New York, Illinois, Hawaii.  Everyone shared their own concerns.

 

When we departed on Monday, it felt like we had gone on a Philmont Trek and I was familiar on what to expect when my troop came again the next summer.

 

And, we finished up getting to meet the Philmont Director and having him talk to us over dinner about Philmont and its operations for two hours.

 

Can't say it enough.   It's a great experience, and it cannot be duplicated locally.   Anything to get your Crew prepared for Philmont is worth it.

 

And did I say you are in New Mexico, get to see the Range Lands, experience heading into the mountains, see Ponderosa Pines, flying Eagles, Urraca Mesa.    Get a picture in front of the Tooth of Time, see Mt. Baldy in the distance, etc.

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We're not withing driving distance (VA) but are willing to pay for a flight there out of our own pockets and the troop is willing to pay the course fee.

 

Thank you @SmithsRow for the detailed reply.  I think we'll try to do that!

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Like I said if you already have the skills it’s redundant training. It’s the same overview you get when you’re at camp. I didn’t find it useful when you take in to account the cost versus the benefit. It’s not like the training is all that in depth or any more detailed than you get your first day. At best you get a taste of Philmont processss. You can replicate all of this locally quite easily. I was a ranger for two years and we built the same training for our troop.

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It is well worth attending the course at Philmont, especially since you are within driving distance.   First, you get a small experience of an actual Philmont trek.   Go through pack shakedown with rangers, load up your pack, be driven to a turnaround, then hike on actual Philmont trails to do training at an actual Philmont backcountry camp.   Usually it is the Lover's Leap camp.  Trek group stops at Lover's Leap.  (Look it up.)   You have to be there to experience it.   Our group had ten scouters during our PSR-PASS weekend.  Finish up the evening sitting around a campfire talking about Philmont and Scouting with other Scouters at Philmont.

 

Three day training goes through everything your crew will do during the first three days at Philmont.   You will go through every area of the Camping Headquarters:  Welcome center, logistics, equipment warehouses, food pickup, storage, post office, etc.   Meet with the head of the infirmary and tour it, gaining an understanding of what happens if there is a medical issue while at Philmont.  Great information to give your parents to let them know how their kids will be cared for.  You will be familiar with what your crew does once you arrive at Philmont.

 

On the trail you eat Philmont trek food.   You get to experience what it is like when you take the entire crew.   Philmont cooking methods, cleanup, sump use.    Also have to follow all Bear procedures to keep your group safe.  Establish Bearmuda Triangle.  Experience Philmont temperature changes. 

 

Sleep in Philmont tents.  Crew splits up crew gear.

 

Directly interact with two Philmont rangers continuously from Friday until Monday morning who give their perspective on what it takes to get a crew ready for a trek.   They share their experiences on the trail with various crews during the past summer.  They share their love of Philmont -- while at Philmont with you on the trail in a relaxed atmosphere.

 

Bear Bags - how can you really experience this unless you are there at the campsite going through the difficulty of actually putting up the bags.   Took our group over an hour which is a similar experience to what the boys get to experience.

 

Experience altitude adjustment at 6,500 feet and what it feels like with loaded pack heading out on the trail.

 

My PASS group had Scouters from around the US getting ready for their treks the next year, Colorado, New York, Illinois, Hawaii.  Everyone shared their own concerns.

 

When we departed on Monday, it felt like we had gone on a Philmont Trek and I was familiar on what to expect when my troop came again the next summer.

 

And, we finished up getting to meet the Philmont Director and having him talk to us over dinner about Philmont and its operations for two hours.

 

Can't say it enough.   It's a great experience, and it cannot be duplicated locally.   Anything to get your Crew prepared for Philmont is worth it.

 

And did I say you are in New Mexico, get to see the Range Lands, experience heading into the mountains, see Ponderosa Pines, flying Eagles, Urraca Mesa.    Get a picture in front of the Tooth of Time, see Mt. Baldy in the distance, etc.

I've attended PSR-PASS and SmithsRow captures the experience perfectly.

 

If you've never been to Philmont, or it's been looooooooong time (like me), I'd highly recommend the PSR-PASS. 

 

@@backpack, I completely understand if you're a former ranger, it may not be necessary to go.  But for folks like me, it was a great chance to be back, learn new techniques, backpack with a group of wonderful scouters and staff, and recapture that Philmont spirit. 

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Regarding equipment, the rangers can supply you a backpack, pack cover, and sleeping pad if needed.   Philmont supplies all cooking gear.  Bring bowl, spork, and cup.   Remember to bring multiple drinking bottles.   Any bottle that has been used for anything other than water is a smellable and has to go up in the Oops Bag to keep it away from bears.    PASS provides an equipment gear to bring.

 

No need for fancy boots since hiking distance is not long.   Only one stream will need to be crossed.  Usually can jump across it unless it has been raining.

 

And, if you forget to bring anything, the Tooth of Time Trading Post will be happy to sell you the item$$$$    Remember to bring money to buy souvenirs.

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I've attended PSR-PASS and SmithsRow captures the experience perfectly.

 

If you've never been to Philmont, or it's been looooooooong time (like me), I'd highly recommend the PSR-PASS. 

 

@@backpack, I completely understand if you're a former ranger, it may not be necessary to go.  But for folks like me, it was a great chance to be back, learn new techniques, backpack with a group of wonderful scouters and staff, and recapture that Philmont spirit.

 

Like I said if you already have the skills or experience it’s not worth it. Maybe older adults find it helpful. :)

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I definitely resemble that remark.  :)

So does my dad. He’s not big on travel for travel’s sake. :) I guess it’s helpful but having taught it so many times its not that remarkable to me anymore. But I guess if folks are looking for an excuse to go to Philmont then this is as good as any. :)

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So does my dad. He’s not big on travel for travel’s sake. :) I guess it’s helpful but having taught it so many times its not that remarkable to me anymore. But I guess if folks are looking for an excuse to go to Philmont then this is as good as any. :)

 

It really is!  So much has changed since I was a youth.  I've been trying to get back for decades but work and family commitments did not permit.  Then, lo and behold, events lined up and I found myself as part of a 2018 contingent, and my work scheduled allowed me to attend PSR-PASS.  

 

A good rule of thumb that applied to me:  if the last time you camped at Philmont, the standard was to cook all of your meals on fire, you'll learn a lot at PSR-PASS.  :)

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