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Another troop dropped by their CO

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Maybe having been a UC, one realizes that there are many ways of running a successful troop.

 

Glad to hear that Stosh, that's quite a reversal. Your "my-way or the highway take no prisoners" approach to contributing on this forum doesn't work well where different ideas are welcome for different folks with different personalities and circumstances. Glade to have you on board.

 

Barry

 

 

 

 

Glad you started reading what I write, and not what you think I've written.  The only thing I have said was wrong was with the troops that run an adult led, troop method program that is contrary to appropriate leadership/character development of young men.  It also applies to the adult led programs that THINK they are boy led.  There's a ton of those out there, too.  Those are the ones that push the management development rather than leadership development.  Of course none of that addresses the femininization of the Boy Scout movement nor the moral issue of going with the Chamberlain approach towards the demands of various political agendas

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Right. Which means you have a board, must submit your own tax and finance records and there's company and personal liability for anything that happens.

 

That's way more exposure than a volunteer needs.

I cannot fathom a Troop being able to do this.  The liability alone is the biggest obstacle.  And the Adult members come and go...a Board?    

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I cannot fathom a Troop being able to do this.  The liability alone is the biggest obstacle.  And the Adult members come and go...a Board?    

 

I'm not an attorney, but as I understand it this is how these "Friends of" COs work. A group of parents form a 501©(3) and establish the organization structure of a non-profit. I believe the organization hold liability and the people in charge have the fiduciary responsibility. I'm not sure if there's any personal liability though. You'd have to ask a lawyer.

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501©3 corporations are not too hard to set up.  Charter and Bylaws filed with the state (with a fee), An address (that needs to be updated) for who (individual or company) will be able to receive process if sued, EIN requested from the IRS and form 1023 (sometimes also with a potentially substantial fee).

 

It also does not have to be 501©3 to be a non-profit corporation.  The 501©3 designation is only necessary if the unit wishes to receive tax-deductible donations, it is not required for unit fundraisers and other fees and dues.  Otherwise they can still incorporate as a non profit corporation (check your specific state for details, limitations, and responsibilities).

 

Usually, the administrative headache is stuff they should be doing anyway - recording meeting minutes, open accounting books for those who make an appointment to review them, etc.  It add the expense of having to file and pay a state franchise fee (in most states).  You do have to file a tax return (even if not tax payment is made) for them, but if the accounts are maintained the Intuit or H&R block software make it a pretty painless process.

 

That said, my understanding from Committee, Commissioner, or some other training I took and other BSA literature, is that these types of COs were at the very least highly discouraged, and possibly even that the BSA would not register any new "friends of" COs.

 

The board of directors and the unit committee can be the same people.  If properly set up, personal liability is rare. That said, Directors and Officers Liability Insurance is still probably a good idea. Passing on control from one generation to the next is really just who is elected to the board of directors of the corporation.

 

As I understand it, even a for-profit company (i.e. Bob's plumbing) could technically CO a unit.

 

I haven't looked into it as a Scouting CO group, but for other things I've done, even a "Trust" could probably be set up to be a CO.

Looking at the 501© regulations, a Scout unit CO could also be a 501©4, 501©7, 501©10

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Yes, a for-profit corporation can charter a scout unit.  We have a pizza place in our area that charters a Cub pack.

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Yes, a for-profit corporation can charter a scout unit.  We have a pizza place in our area that charters a Cub pack.

A funeral home two towns over charters a troop.

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I have a guy in the community that Our District Eagle Award Ceremony's are named after, hes been to 10+ Jamboree's 4+ World jamboree and Philmont atleast 8 times.  A mans Man! and he is also a Lawyer.   

 

Once I started getting involved with the scouts and all this inclusive stuff started I sat down with him and had a talk.  (fortunate enough he is dear friends with my father in law so getting an appointment was easy) He said to me "Jason I am not going to stop doing what I love for 2% of the population, The BSA has the best program there is for young men and I am going to keep doing it"  That ment a lot to me because I just knew as traditional as he was that he was just going to curse the BSA up one side and down another. 

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However, if the funeral home has a crematorium, one could do pizza for the whole district..... :rolleyes:

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