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SeattlePioneer

Cub Scout Adult Leadership & Scouting Values

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At our Cub Scout Day Camp,  we had several activities that involved making things,  such as a decorated shield and stilts.

 

 

Some boys failed to attend camp the day these activities were conducted.

 

I was asked to make these projects for the boys who failed to attend camp,  and I resisted doing so. 

 

My theory was that MAKING the project was the activity,  not having the project made for you by someone else.

 

Also,  in my view,  Scouting is about discovering that life is making choices.  You often have to make choices about what you will do,  and live with the consequences.  It might very well be that boys missed camp for good and sufficient reasons,  but despite that there are consequences to that decision.

 

I was told that the parents of absent boys would complain about their boys missing out on getting stuff.  (My view is that not only boys need to learn that actions have consequences,  but apparently some adults as well).

 

 

Any comments would be welcome.

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I agree with you!

 

I can maybe.... just maybe.... agree with the idea of making directions or templates available, if such a thing exists... so that a boy could do the activity on their own if they wanted....

But only if it existed, like say if you had an already typed up and digitized instruction sheet

and only if it were possible to share in such a way that doesn't involve further work on your end.... like a quick email or online post maybe....

 

But nothing wrong with not making it available either..... life's lessons and all....

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When this ever actually happened, and we thought it mattered, we asked one of the boys in the den if he'd make (or bag-n-tag the materials for) a second project to give to his buddy who missed the event.

 

When I was a kid with tonsillitis and missed church camp, my buddies did basically that and brought home some natural clay figurines and a tin can of the stuff that they kept damp for me to play with. Not sure what my mom thought, but it was a fond memory.

 

Never in my wildest dreams would I ask a director to take up the slack.

 

Heck, I'd be grateful for one less thing cluttering my attic or my in-law's fridge. ;)

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I love it. Thanks for posting. At least everyone will agree on this one.

 

Are you sure you're not trolling for some good vibes on this website? :)

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Nothing wrong with some good vibes these days. I think you made the best decision that you could. Qwazse had some good suggestions that are also worth consideration.  When I was CM, it was tough for me to turn down any request. Sometimes they just ask too much.

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If you did not go to camp for whatever reason, that is their (parents choice).  It is not fair for the parents to ask you to do extra stuff based on things missed for the Scouts that were not there.

Though, you could ask...if I did this you will pay me the entire camp fee for my services...;)

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At our Cub Scout Day Camp,  we had several activities that involved making things,  such as a decorated shield and stilts.

 

 

Some boys failed to attend camp the day these activities were conducted.

 

I was asked to make these projects for the boys who failed to attend camp,  and I resisted doing so. 

 

My theory was that MAKING the project was the activity,  not having the project made for you by someone else.

 

Also,  in my view,  Scouting is about discovering that life is making choices.  You often have to make choices about what you will do,  and live with the consequences.  It might very well be that boys missed camp for good and sufficient reasons,  but despite that there are consequences to that decision.

 

I was told that the parents of absent boys would complain about their boys missing out on getting stuff.  (My view is that not only boys need to learn that actions have consequences,  but apparently some adults as well).

 

 

Any comments would be welcome.

 

 

 

 

Agree with you this council does!

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I cast my vote for the sympathy ("too bad Jessie Cub was sick that day.  Here's the materials, and some instructions.  Maybe he can make'm during the lunch break. Oh?  He just didn't get up in time and you decided it wasn't worth the effort ?  Well, that's okay too.  Here's a volunteer application...".)

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