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k9gold-scout

US Court upholds 10 Commandments on public land

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Rooster,

I think silent reflection is an excellent exercise and I heartily recommend it. A minute of introspective silence is a good way to start (or end) the day, whether at home, work, or in school. However, I think a requirement to do this would be a bad idea. It would probably be a waste of time for most students - a few would make good use of the time, but most would probably sleep. Moreover, those who genuinely want to pray or meditate or self reflect probably already have better opportunities each morning than while sitting in homeroom.

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Gold Winger, by not filing a lawsuit yourself, or having the ACLU (or even a christians-rights-only group like the ACLJ) file a lawsuit on your children's behalf, you are allowing the rights of your children and any other christian students at your kids' school to be unlawfully infringed by that school. In short, you are permitting the government to violate your children's rights by doing nothing (assuming you aren't now pursuing legal remedies in some way).

 

If you WANT to surrender your own children's rights so easily, you can, but it's hardly a good example, and can likely lead to further infringements.

 

Have any of your children been prevented from praying by school officials?

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"GW, do your kids bang their heads on the ground?"

 

Nah, they're Epicalopians.

 

I just view the whole thing as part of the destruction of America which includes those idiotic voice menus that tell you to press 1 for English.

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By the way, TheScout, since you posted a reference from www.christianparty.net, do you also participate in their forum? Lots of, uh, "interesting" topics.

 

(removed direct link to their forum because the URL gets mangled; just click the front page link)(This message has been edited by Merlyn_LeRoy)

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Who's talking about converting anyone? This is about prayer in public school, not conversion! If a student asks a teacher a religious question, he/she can answer it. 1st Amendment! And a teacher can ask a student a religious question? 1st Amendment! And neither would be establishing any type of religion!

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Its not a violation of the 1st amendment if an auto parts store owner restricts his clerk from asking every customer if they found Jesus.

The clerk can ask anyone on their own time, but not on the clock if the employer doesn't want it.

Same goes for the school teacher.

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I think someone should give that deity a map and compass; he seems to always be getting lost.

 

;)

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Ed, STUDENTS can ask teachers anything they want; what teachers say in return, or what questions the teachers ask, are from their position as a public school employee, not as a private citizen. A schoolteacher can't ask a student "Are you saved or are you going to hell?"

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Again with the conversion stuff! A teacher can ask a student what denomination they are! And if the student doesn't want to tell, that is their prerogative, but the question is allowed.

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Merlyn, I am a little confused. You asked Gold Winger to identify the school his kids go to so the ACLU could procure a "Christian" praying room to match the Muslim praying room. Is that accurate? Why would the ACLU want to procure a Christian Praying room? Isn't the placement of a Muslim and Chritian Praying rooms the state advocating those two belief systems? If a Jewish, Pagan, Hindu, Budhist, etc prayer rooms were to be added, and all belief sytems represented, wouldn't there have to then be a Atheist, "no prayer" room? I thought that Public schools were not suposed have any mention of religious beliefs advocated, what am I getting wrong?

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Ed, your cries of first amendment are misapplied. A teacher can ask a student some things about religion, but not because of the teacher's first amendment rights; if that were so, the teacher could ALSO ask the student "are you saved or are you going to hell," because the first amendment allows that question too.

 

But a teacher CAN'T ask a student "are you saved or are you going to hell" because they are acting as a state employee.

 

And if a teacher has been overtly trying to e.g. convert students, the school administrators COULD order the teacher to not ask about religion at all, including merely asking a student what his denomination is. A teacher has no "right" to ask such a question, because they can be prohibited from doing so by their employers.

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OGE, I said "They'll even make sure they can have a room just like the muslim kids." If students can use rooms for praying, that applies to all students equally. It would likely be the same room, or just whatever room(s) are unused at the time.

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