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Burnside

Use/Abuse of Native culture in Arrow of Light Ceremony

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So, if the boys dressed in Star Trek uniforms and gave accommodation from the Galactic Federation, would you be less offended?

 

If a native American actor puts on a Bishop's robe to play some part that he finds noble about our culture, should we be offended?

 

I could go over the pros of imitating the good we see in other cultures ..., but let's leave it at this:

 

It's fun. Lighten up.

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>>"I think inviting the OA in to do it is a huge wet blanket. Those are slow and generally offensive and uncomfortable for most 21st century educated americans."

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"So, if the boys dressed in Star Trek uniforms and gave accommodation from the Galactic Federation, would you be less offended? "

 

No ... because the base story line is fiction.

 

OA mimics (usually badly) Native Americans, which is not fiction.

 

With a Star Wars theme ... Scouts would likely have a huge upsurge in enrollment.

 

I remember my Scout's crossover...it was incredibly embarrassing to watch, even my Scout turned away during some parts of it.(This message has been edited by Engineer61)

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It all really depends upon the ceremony team and the script they are using. Have I seen cheesy regalia and cheesy performance, yes. Have I seen cheesey regalia and good performance, yes. have I seen awesome reagalia and cheesy performance yes. Have I seen awesome reagalia and awesome performance.

 

You better beleive I have and it was inspirational.

 

The problem is the concept of the "Hollywood Indian," and it's so prevelent that some folks, when they do authentic, period regalia, they do not beleive it is real and that a lot of research has gone into it.

 

 

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The main idea is to put on a ceremony that has more to it than a ziploc bag and a handshake. There are lots of ceremonies that I do that have nothing at all to do with "facts" or "authentic," but I certainly try to make them memorable and fun. This is Cub Scouts, not the inauguration of a Surpreme Court Justice (I was going to say President, but I was afraid someone would start commenting on the comedy aspects of that!).

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I also believe this generation does not have the emotional attachment to indian/frontier motifs as a while back. It has been a long time since coonskin hats were big sellers.

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>>All of the Cubs in our Pack really love the OA American Indian ceremonies.

 

Perhaps your OA Ceremony Team simply needs to do a better job.

 

Or maybe our Pack is just full of UN-educated folks. Although I would bet that most of us uneducated yokels at least know enough to capitalize "Americans".

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>>The problem is the concept of the "Hollywood Indian," and it's so prevelent that some folks, when they do authentic, period regalia, they do not beleive it is real and that a lot of research has gone into it.

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My understanding is that the ceromonies have been clreared by rerpresentatives of the Indian tribes. If they have cleared them why do we all have a problem with them. Seems like a bit self rightous to me.

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My understanding is that the ceromonies have been clreared by rerpresentatives of the Indian tribes. If they have cleared them why do we all have a problem with them. Seems like a bit self rightous to me.

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BSA24 - Why were adults (a) dressing up as Indians or (b) dancing? Adults in the OA should be doing nothing of the sort.

 

ponz - Arrow of Light or crossover ceremonies are often developed locally, and not necessarily "screened."

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BSA,

 

There are folks who do the right thing in regards to Native Americans, regalia, and ceremonies. But there are challenges: folks don't want to do the research to do the regalia right, folks don't want to spend the time or money to make or buy the items as authentic as possible ( i.e. a 18' hair roach at Crazy Crow goes for $290 for deer hair on the outside only and $345 for deer hair in and out). And some folks just get frustrated when they do things correctly and people tell them "that ain't an Indian costume." (had that happen one time when I was in my dance regalia).

 

And yes there are Native American who have complaints against the OA, but there are also for who are not only for it, but even help promote Native American Culture within the OA. I won't go into details here, but check a few of my other threads on this topic and you can read about my first hand experiences with Native Americans helping the OA do things right.

 

In regards to Adults and ceremonies and dancing. Correct in that adults do not dress in regalia and do ceremonies. They also cannot compete BUT they can dress out and dance at event powwows. Someof the most fun I had was after a day of judging dance competion, dancing at the powwow that night after the arena show.

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