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Laurie

Hiking boots on a budget?

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Any recommendations for a sturdy leather boot with a sole that wears well? Most of my hiking is done on rocky trails and/or by creeks. I tend to slip in sneakers on these same trails, and I've also worn the tread off sneakers with only a few miles, so the boots are important. Due to a back injury, I need ankle support, as hiking aggravates my back, but I refuse to quit. Also, funds are really tight, so my hope is to get a decent price. The pair I'm replacing cost $50 on sale (they are no longer made), which is a lot for us, but I'm willing to spend that amount again. I'm not asking for much though, huh ;) Timberland has done well for one of my boys and for my 3-year-old, but they feel very heavy and awkward to me, so I've been able to rule them out. I haven't tried any others yet, but would greatly appreciate ideas on other brands.

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Check out Red Head. Bass Pro carries them, I'm not sure who else does. You can look at them on there web site.

 

Barry

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i have boots made by quest. i think Dicks sells them. they were around $35. they have been on the roughtest part of the AT, and are about to do another part of the AT again this summer. with how much ive ruffed them up, im amazed that they still are in working order

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Laurie,

 

I'd take a serious look at a Red Wing shoe store. They specialize in footwear for folks who are out of doors, both in the trades and in "leisure work"

 

 

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I recently got a pair of Garmont at www.campmor.com for about 50. They were on sale........They have been a good pair, and I am extremely picky as to what I wear and comfort.

 

 

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I just bought a pair of Wolverine boots (made right here in Michigan) for $10 at Dicks. Really more of a work boot but not bad for hiking and the price was right. I also own a pair of Nevados - again cheap but not bad.

 

I have a problem with real big calves and small feet (high arches). Any shoe that goes mor than an inch above my ankle is either way to loose in the foot or way to tight around the leg/calf. I have a real nice pair of Red Head boot (from Bass Pro) Eagledad mentioned that are great for winter but after a day of wearing them my leg is sore for a week.

 

What I have never been able to find is a good thermal boot/shoe (I live in Michigan) that is NOT above the ankle. Most go high for snow protection but with my weird anatomy, I can't wear those type of boots very well.

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Hi,

 

Our troop's favorite brand for the budget group is Hi-Teck. You can pick them up at many sporting goods stores.

 

Also have a look at REI.com (go to their clearance areas) & Cabelas.com (I can never remember if it's one or two 'l's)

 

You'll find something, it'll be good!

 

As was mentioned Campmor has good stuff too. Good luck!

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Thanks for all the great ideas! I'm pleasantly surprised that there are several good boots within my price range and appreciate your help.

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I have been wearing hiking type boots for severalyears. I started wearing them at work because I am on concrete all day. I get some from Academy called Nevados for a couple of years. They cost me about $29.00. I get two paid one a half size larger than the other. In the winter I wear smartwool socks with liners and in the summer I wear light hiking socks. I love them And they last. I am in the auto remair business and they get all kinds of stuff on them and they hold up well. I also wear them camping and hiking. Did about 30 miles this weekend and not one problem.

I know that some people would think they are just to cheap to be good. But I like them.

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You get what you pay for, like anything else. Like the people who park their Lincoln Navigator at the trailhead and stroll off in WalMart boots. What do the above posters do when their cheap boots fall apart 10 miles from camp? We had a scout lose both soles from cheap($75) boots last year, he was nearly crippled when he got to the car. Another kid broke an ankle because the cheap steel-toed (imagine!) boots his mom bought him at a discount store didn't fit so he hiked in tennies.

Our Troop keeps an inventory of good used boots donated by former scouts (Vasque, Montrail etc) that kids can borrow, use and return when they outgrow them. Some boots have had 3-4 owners, still working, and better than new junk. Also Ebay seems to have a lot of good used boots cheap cheap.

Give yourself a break and don't buy junk.

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Just one consideration I would put forth here. When you buy a decent pair of hiking boots, look at the number of years you expect to keep them. If you spend $100 for boots that last for 5 years, $20 a year for well made boots that fit well and protect your feet is a good investment. I would also look at the lightweight hiking boots that are not made out of leather. They wear well and are much easier on the legs!

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John D. The $29.99 Nevado boots that I wore this weekend to outdoor skills training are about 1.5 years old. I wear these boots every day at work. And they are exposed to oil, transmissin fluid and antifreeze every day. The pair I work this weekend to outdoor skills training and about 1.5 years old. And still in very good shape. I work them to the last hiking trip. We hiked about 20 miles. I have never had a blister wearing these boots and have never had sore feet after a hike.

I buy them and put them on and stand on an angle and make sure my toes do not hit against the toe of the boot. The very first pair of this type of hiking boots I bought are now about 5 years old. I now wear them to mow the yard. But I wouldn't think twice about hiking in them.

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Lynda J you're a machine, no doubt about it. Anyone who can hike like you after working in a garage all day could probably run a marathon in flipflops. My point is , the average scout should economise somewhere else, not your feet. Skip the water purifying gizmos (bleach is just as good), the freeze dried food (a rip off) and invest in good boots. And more Troops should try my boot buy-back plan. Our Troop pays half price for any good quality boots a kid outgrows, then sells them to younger kids. Now some folks are snobs and wont touch yucky used boots, rather have new Chinese ones from Rip Mart than 2 year old Italian boots.

That's fine, just don't walk too far from the parking lot.

 

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I just bought a pair of Hi-Tec boots for my youngest son. They were $20 at Sportsmans Warehouse. They aren't gortex and are leather/synthetic uppers but fit him and the soles seem to be pretty good. He is a cub scout so will most likely not be doing too much hiking. I also bought a pair of REI boots for about 4-5X's as much for my oldest son going to Philmont a couple of months ago. I think boots are not a place to skimp. I have several pairs (2 Danners, Cabelas, Red Wing and Pivettas) of hiking boots not to mention Pacs, ditch boots and wading boots. Getting the fit right can be tricky and pay attention to the soles. I like a fairly aggessive sole but soles that look similar can be quite different in performance. I think it has to do with the rubber. Last summer I shattered a knee backpacking when the boots I was wearing slipped on a wet surface. The tread was fine on dry stuff but wading rivers it was real slippery. I'm not sure if another pair of boots would have prevented it but it's something to think about. Also, be sure to try them on under the load you will be carrying and in the socks you will wear. I have another pair of boots that worked fine backpacking in the Big Horns but I had terrible blisters on a 20 mile hike with no load although I think it was due to the wrong socks.

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