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CynicalScouter

Scouting U/National sanctioned virtual IOLS is now a reality

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I wanted to pull this as its own topic out of the WB thread.

Here's the first confirmed sighting of (National-sanctioned) virtual IOLS in the wild out of National Capital Council.

https://scoutingevent.com/082-40623

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Mountain West Service Area is pleased to announce a beta VIRTUAL edition of the Introduction to Outdoor Leader Skills - IOLS (S11) course in NCAC. Although this class is a first-run in our Service Area, full credit will be awarded to those who successfully complete all sessions. The class will be held Saturday, October 10th through Sunday, October 11th, 2020. Please read all information in this event description carefully; there are unique conditions in place for this program.

IOLS is the required outdoor training for all Scoutmasters and Assistant Scoutmasters. The course is also ideal for Venturing Leaders because it focuses on building confidence and competence in conducting outdoor camping experiences. Outdoor skills are critical to the success of any Scouting program. IOLS provides Leaders with the basic outdoor skills to start a program right and keep it going.

This course consists of three virtual classroom sessions held on day one leading up to an overnight campout at each participants’ backyard or other independent outdoor location. A final classroom session follows the next morning (day two). ZOOM meeting invites will be provided after registration closes. All sessions must be attended to receive credit for this course.

COST:  $10.00 - Prepaid online registration is required by October 07, 2020 and is non-refundable.

CLASS SIZE: Maximum of 24 participants, first come-first served. Registration may close early if maximum capacity is reached.

REQUIRED UNIFORM: Class A Scout Leader Uniform is required for all virtual classroom sessions.

REQUIRED CAMPING EQUIPMENT: Full camping gear for an overnight stay (tent, ground cloth, lantern/flashlight, sleeping bag and pad, sturdy shoes, change of clothes, rain gear, coat/jacket/hat, water bottle, and camp chair) and two approximately 30-inch-long pieces of rope. Camping overnight (in your backyard) is part of the course.

SUGGESTED PREVIOUS CAMPING EXPERIENCE: Participants will ideally have at least three prior overnight camping experiences; more is preferable. Participants will also benefit by having learned tenting, outdoor cooking and sanitation, and basic campership skills equivalent to a First Class Scout (see Scouts BSA Handbook).

REQUIRED TECHNOLOGY: PC or MAC and a high-speed internet connection with sufficient memory and processor to handle video streaming. ZOOM client or web browser edition is required with both audio and video capability (both mic and camera must be operational and active throughout the course). 

MEALS: will not be provided. We have not yet perfected the art of passing an entire foil dinner through a wireless connection.

COURSE PREREQUISITES: All participants must complete the following online training modules BEFORE the course begins:

  1. My.Scouting Learning Plan Modules (https://my.scouting.org) - My Training - Training Center (not required if the participant has already taken these modules as part of the current Scoutmaster Specific training or the S24 Classroom training courses)::
  • Scouts BSA: Scoutmaster - First 30 Days section - "Patrol Method for Scouts BSA" (9 min)
  • Scouts BSA: Scoutmaster - First 30 Days section - "Outdoor Programs for Scouts BSA" (9 min)
  • Scouts BSA: Scoutmaster - Position Trained section - "Outdoor Ethics for Scouts BSA" (8 min)
  • Expanded Learning: Program Safety section - "Hazardous Weather Training" (31 min)
  1. Troop Program Resources - Campcraft Skills Videos
 
COURSE SCHEDULE:
 
Saturday, October 10th:
8:00 AM  –  ZOOM Room opens for sign-in, gathering time
8:30 AM  –  Course Starts: Session 1 (virtual classroom)
10:00 AM – Session 1 ends
**
1:00 PM  –  Session 2 begins (virtual classroom)
3:15 PM  –  Session 2 ends
**
7:00 PM  –  Session 3 begins (classroom, then outdoors in participants' backyards)
10:00 PM  –  Session 3 ends (Taps)
 
** ZOOM room will remain open between sessions for participant questions and fellowship
 
Sunday, October 11th:
7:30 AM – Session 4 begins (Interfaith Worship)
10:00 AM – Session 4 ends (Course Completes)

Participants who successfully complete this course will receive an IOLS training card and a “Trained” patch if they have completed all other requirements for their position.

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Further confirmation from National Capital Council's training page: virtual IOLS is now the preferred method. https://weownadventure.com/new-adult-live-training-guidelines/
 

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For in-person training activities by a District or Council training committee, if a virtual option is available, like the Beta-Virtual IOLS, it is preferred that the virtual course is presented. If a virtual training option is not available or does not meet our needs, the guidelines listed above must be followed.

 

Edited by CynicalScouter

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One more item: while this might MIGHT be put in place as a COVID emergency, I cannot see that it will stay that way. Virtual IOLS is here to stay.

Of course some councils may simply refuse to do it; but if I'm in one council and can find another council that will do it virtually, since IOLS certification is valid nationwide, why not right? I mean I can now become a 100% position trained SM without ever having to leave my back yard.

Hazardous Weather: Online

YPT: Online

SM/ASM Training: Online

IOLS: Online + sleep in a tent in my backyard.

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2 hours ago, CynicalScouter said:

COST:  $10.00 - Prepaid online registration is required by October 07, 2020 and is non-refundable.

So it is $10 to watch something online  AND camp in the backyard. Do they ship the food to me, or do I need to get my own food?

 

2 hours ago, CynicalScouter said:
10:00 AM – Session 1 ends
**
1:00 PM  –  Session 2 begins (virtual classroom)

 3 hours for lunch? Must  include nap time.

 

2 hours ago, CynicalScouter said:
3:15 PM  –  Session 2 ends
**
7:00 PM  –  Session 3 begins (classroom, then outdoors in participants' backyards)

3hours 45 minutes for dinner and KP?

 

I am really not impressed with this training. I think C-3P0 said it best:

C-3PO Were Doomed | Comics quote, Star wars, Doom

Edited by Eagle94-A1
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11 minutes ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

So it is $10 to watch something online  AND camp in the backyard. Do they ship the food to me, or do I need to get my own food?

Read further

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MEALS: will not be provided. We have not yet perfected the art of passing an entire foil dinner through a wireless connection.

 

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Nor have they mastered teaching outdoor skills on line.  Not nearly.  More pretend accomplishment.

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21 hours ago, TAHAWK said:

Nor have they mastered teaching outdoor skills on line.  Not nearly.  More pretend accomplishment.

They haven't even gotten close to mastering outdoor skills in the few hours that are allotted together, in the outdoors. I had to teach knife and axe in an hour at IOLS. I won't do it again. I suppose, if there were enough axe yards for two people in each one along with an instructor and enough wood so each student could spend 20 minutes splitting wood then it would be helpful. But that's just using an axe. I could spend as much time teaching how to sharpen a knife. Give everyone a dull knife and a stone. So, online or in person isn't enough of a distinction. I think an online video on how to sharpen these things combined with coming together and doing it would be ideal. The issue is how much time is spent on the skills and whether it's hands on. Honestly, 4 hours of videos along with a kit and time alone to practice might be better than our outdoor version. But then there are safety issues. I don't have an answer.

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4 hours ago, MattR said:

They haven't even gotten close to mastering outdoor skills in the few hours that are allotted together, in the outdoors.

Concur, but that is why they call it the "Introduction to..."

Is there a BSA course for adults to learn these skills in any depth?  Not in my experience...even went to National Camp School twice for Scoutcraft (back in the day).  It was better, but still didn't hit the mark.

It wasn't until I started reading my Scout Handbook and the merit badge pamphlets, putting together the materials and skills so I could teach them at Scout camp...(served on 15 camp staffs in various disciplines.)

I have taught many IOLS classes...and too many people are looking for the "easy" answer or some magic pill for skills.  They are only won by study, diligence, and practice. (Same as for Scouts ;) )

Now, when a Scout or adult asks me a skills question, my first response is usually, "Let's see what the Scout Handbook says?" And then we sit down and read through the section together. 

It's really amazing what you find.  Over 112 years of knowledge distilled in there... 

 

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8 hours ago, MattR said:

They haven't even gotten close to mastering outdoor skills in the few hours that are allotted together, in the outdoors. I had to teach knife and axe in an hour at IOLS. I won't do it again. I suppose, if there were enough axe yards for two people in each one along with an instructor and enough wood so each student could spend 20 minutes splitting wood then it would be helpful. But that's just using an axe. I could spend as much time teaching how to sharpen a knife. Give everyone a dull knife and a stone. So, online or in person isn't enough of a distinction. I think an online video on how to sharpen these things combined with coming together and doing it would be ideal. The issue is how much time is spent on the skills and whether it's hands on. Honestly, 4 hours of videos along with a kit and time alone to practice might be better than our outdoor version. But then there are safety issues. I don't have an answer.

My single favorite moment from Cub Scouts was when my son''s Bear den leader taught knife skills.  He spent three whole meetings on it.

  • Week 1 - he brought in the largest selection of knives I've ever seen.  Hunting knives, cooking knives, utility knives, you name it.  He explained blade construction.  He explained handles design.  The scouts got to handle everything and see how they worked.  He then taught the boys how to sharpen a blade.  He had more sharpening stones than I've ever seen.  He explained how to remove gauges and how to progress through different stones to get the best edge.  He explained why you need oil on a stone.  He had every Scout try it.
  • Week 2 - he taught the scouts how to handle and cut with a knife.  I learned things in that meeting as the asst. den leader that I use in my kitchen every day.  How to hold food with the tips of my fingers pointing down.  He explained how different knives were better for different applications - how a scalpel is good for cutting skin, how an kitchen knife is good for food, how a hunting knife good for splitting bones.
  • Week 3 - the scouts worked on carving different substances.  

There were no games those weeks, no other advancement.  It was a serious discussion with a bunch of 9 year olds on how to use knives.  You know what - they loved it.

To this day, the depth of knowledge he shared was amazing.  If I had my way, that's what we'd do with adults too - not try to condense learning to use an axe to an hour or do it online.

Edited by ParkMan
expanded the thought
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13 hours ago, ParkMan said:

... If I had my way, that's what we'd do with adults too - not try to condense learning to use an axe to an hour or do it online.

In other words scouters should work their way through the advancement program to 1st class ... getting signed off by an SPL or JASM as they obtain skill mastery.

 

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16 minutes ago, qwazse said:

In other words scouters should work their way through the advancement program to 1st class ... getting signed off by an SPL or JASM as they obtain skill mastery.

 

In content - probably essentially.  I wouldn't ask the adults to work through the program though - I'd do it much more interactively.   Have a Saturday morning where a knowledgeable Scouter teaches all the ins and outs of using an axe and creating an axe yard.  For volunteers I think you have to increase the interaction and make it more hands on.  That groups needs to add some fun and socializing to it.  In a sense there has to be a distinction between work and Scouting.

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13 hours ago, ParkMan said:

To this day, the depth of knowledge he shared was amazing.  If I had my way, that's what we'd do with adults too - not try to condense learning to use an axe to an hour or do it online.

I agree, wood tools needs more time in training AND information in the SHB. When I reviewed the last time I did IOLS, the section on wood tools in the BSHB was missing so much info compared to older BSHBs, that I handed out sections from my 1960s FB and some other sources.

 

23 minutes ago, qwazse said:

In other words scouters should work their way through the advancement program to 1st class ... getting signed off by an SPL or JASM as they obtain skill mastery.

Mixed emotions on this one. While I agree the older Scouts should be able to teach the younger Scouts and new adults these skills, I've seen a few things that make me question the idea. First the idea of "One and Done" is so prevalent, I am seeing fewer and fewer Scouts that actually have the skills to do the teaching. Sad but true. Best example is the 17 year old Life Scout who could not do basic T-2-1 first aid skills because " i took it my first year at summer camp, I don't remember them." The second concern is adults intimidating Scouts. I have seen and heard about  adults intimidate Scouts, sometimes to disastrous effects. I have seen adults trying to change OA elections get "upset" to the point that I had to intervene and defend the youth. And one of the reasons my sons and I left a troop was because 2 adults intimidated the Scouts to the point that the SPL walked away. What was supposed to be a good trip and recruiting opportunity was a total charley foxtrot. Not only did none of the Webelos who were suppose to camp with us join the troop, we left the troop because of the yahoos and their actions that weekend. I wish I was there with the troop to put a stop to them.

 

7 minutes ago, ParkMan said:

In content - probably essentially.  I wouldn't ask the adults to work through the program though - I'd do it much more interactively.   Have a Saturday morning where a knowledgeable Scouter teaches all the ins and outs of using an axe and creating an axe yard.  For volunteers I think you have to increase the interaction and make it more hands on.  That groups needs to add some fun and socializing to it.  In a sense there has to be a distinction between work and Scouting.

I have had older Scouts staff my IOLS, just like they do WB now. It works.

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6 hours ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

I agree, wood tools needs more time in training AND information in the SHB. When I reviewed the last time I did IOLS, the section on wood tools in the BSHB was missing so much info compared to older BSHBs, that I handed out sections from my 1960s FB and some other sources.

Absolutely.  I love when I get to attend talks on outdoor skills.  Camp cooking, tool usage, tent setup - that's interesting and fun stuff.  Learning to be a great outdoors person is an amazing skill.  I love that  you pulled out prior references and shared them.

6 hours ago, Eagle94-A1 said:

I have had older Scouts staff my IOLS, just like they do WB now. It works.

I'm all for older Scouts have a training role in Scouting.  It's a great way for them to practice adult association.  Being 16 and really teaching a skill to a bunch of adults is a great life lesson.  Yet, I think it's important that the lessons be real and not dumbed down.

My sense is that training for adults needs to be real training - not superficial stuff.  Real people sharing real skills.  If that can be taught be a 17 year old - that's great.  But, the adult has to walk away from that session thinking - hey, that was really useful.

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23 hours ago, InquisitiveScouter said:

Concur, but that is why they call it the "Introduction to..."

But we all got signed off on all the requirements when we took IOLS. My understanding is that it was supposed to be enough for an adult to teach a scout the skills. After having swung the axe half a dozen times before teaching someone else how to swing it this sounds like guaranteed frustration for everyone involved - the new leader, the IOLS instructor and the scout.

This thread is all about online training being a mistake. My only point is that solving this problem won't solve the bigger issue of accepting that all of the skills take time to learn. Online training could be part of the solution, I wouldn't rule it out. But in person training isn't sufficient.

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9 hours ago, MattR said:

But we all got signed off on all the requirements when we took IOLS. My understanding is that it was supposed to be enough for an adult to teach a scout the skills. After having swung the axe half a dozen times before teaching someone else how to swing it this sounds like guaranteed frustration for everyone involved - the new leader, the IOLS instructor and the scout.

AND THAT IS THE PROBLEM! (emphasis) When you read the syllabus, they do the activity and get signed off, and there is a comment that goes something like "just like the Scout." They also want you give give out cut out badges as they do the skills. IMHO this only promotes the "one and done" attitude.

When I teach IOLS, I tell them they WILL need to practice and practice. I say the course is not designed for them to teach outdoor skills, but rather to have the basics down so they are not a burden on the Scouts. Anyone remember the old Berenstain Bears book on the Bear Scouts, when Papa Bear takes over as SM with a know it all attitude, but no training?

Let's face it who would you rather have teaching, the adult who went through a weekend training, or a 13 year old who has been through 2-3 years of camping? 

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