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le Voyageur

Rifle Shooting Merit Badge, Option C Req. L

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Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzleloading rifle.

My points

1.    A full stock Southern Style Poor Boy rifle based on the 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifle. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpers_Ferry_Model_1803

2.    Siler Lock (flint lock)

3.    Barrel - 4140 CroMo steel, 32 inch, 54 caliber octagonal barrel,  1:48 right twist polygonal rifling... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitworth_rifle,   bore line correct to 3 decimal places.

4.    Walnut stock, Iron furniture

5.    Open sights.  Rear sight set at center of balance

6.    Lollipop Tang

7.    Set Triggers

8.    Straight Cast

9.    Drop at Comb - 1.5 inches

10.  Drop at Heel - 2 inches

11.   Length of Pull - 13.5 inches

12.  Eye Relief from Rear Sight to Nose of Comb - 13.5 inches

13.  Trigger guard sized for gloved hand           

 

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Got a little rush last night, had to cut it short...to continue. So, why these points?   Here, the goal  and purpose is to lay out the general requirements that will allow me to build a long range hunting rifle that is very accurate. Some may change later on in the build.  Basically,  the ideal is to follow nearly in the same steps as Jacob and Samuel Hawken who patterned their "Plains" and "Mountain" rifles on the 1803 Harpers Ferry. By marrying three different patterns (Poor Boy, Harpers, Whitworth) the best elements of each can be incorporated into a robust platform lacking the bells and whistles seen in such fragile rifles as the Pennsylvania's,.  Using polygonal rifling (Whitworth), and a barrel length of 32 inches a 105 grain charge of 2F should send a  54 caliber, 430 grain Maxi Ball out to about 800 yards plus at 1200 fps. Though this type of rifling is noted for fouling, it's of no great concern as it can be used to one's advantage to better seat the round (fouling shots).  However, most will start off with an off the rack muzzle loader (hopefully not an inline) . Regardless of the make or caliber,  be it a percussion, or a flintlock, the most important primary elements to consider are the barrel's proof markings (safety)  length of pull, and drop at comb (fit). And, that the sights are parallel to, and centered over the bore line (accuracy).

 

Edited by le Voyageur

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@le Voyageur - Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzleloading rifle.

 

Key point - How will it perform in the Zombie Apocalypse?

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I think this varies with the interests of the scout. Your second post has more general answers:

36 minutes ago, le Voyageur said:

... allow me to build

... range

.... [how] accurate.

... may change later on in the build

... follow nearly in the same steps as Jacob and Samuel Hawken

... marrying ... different patterns

... a robust platform

... bells and whistles [vs] fragile rifles

Some of my scouts are generalists (like I am when it comes to munitions). Others love to wade into the weeds and go on an on about rifling, barrel length, range, sighting, and velocity. The goal is to help the generalist to think a little more about the details, and to get the scout who's stuck on details out of the weeds!

21 minutes ago, Jameson76 said:

... Key point - How will it perform in the Zombie Apocalypse?

@Jameson76, depends on which Zombie is using it. :ph34r:

BTW - did anyone else go to school where guys made guns in shop and decorated stocks in art class? I never took on a project like that myself, but I was mesmerized by my friends' craftsmanship.

 

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