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RememberSchiff

Persistence and Adaptability

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Im definitely going to fight for everything." Because no one climbs from Cub Scout to Eagle Scout, a journey of about a dozen years in his case, by accident. It requires a remarkable commitment.  "When I was growing up, I thought I would not finish because it was just so long and you had to do so much. But my grandma and my auntie wanted me to finish, and I did it. It taught me so much, like how to make something out of nothing.

A.J.Rose 6-foot-1, 212-pound redshirt freshman running back for the Kentucky Wildcats

https://www.seccountry.com/kentucky/kentucky-football-uk-wildcats-aj-rose-benny-snell-backfield

Edited by RememberSchiff
removed excessive whitespace

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Very nice. And eloquently said. Thank you for posting.

 

Surprised by the whole, "I had to stay 2 nights alone in the woods for my final test for Eagle" thing, though.

Edited by Ankylus

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Rose surveys his surroundings and adapts accordingly. That was one of his final tests to achieve Eagle Scout status: two days alone in the woods with only a water bottle, rope and knife. It took hours to snag his first meal.

You had to be patient, Rose said. If you did not figure out how to catch a fish, you were notgoing to eat.

Yes, there may have been a misunderstanding by the reporter, though I know adults in some units teach more in-depth survival such as water collection, tracking, snare building.

As I have said before, I favor a solo Eagle trek over an Eagle project.

Edited by RememberSchiff
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... Yes, there may have been a misunderstanding by the reporter, though I know adults in some units teach more in-depth survival such as water collection, tracking, snare building.

 

As I have said before, I favor a solo Eagle trek over an Eagle project.

 

I suspect wilderness survival was one of his electives. Or, maybe he was just short on nights for Camping MB, and his counselor threw down a challenge. Maybe he decided to challenge himself. We adults can't add to the requirements, but if a boy says, "I want to do X before making rank," who's gonna stop him?

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Update:   UK's top running back says Boy Scouts taught him the 'man skills' to be a leader

“He feels like he’s got to step up… he’s the biggest leader of our group, and I appreciate him for that,” Smoke said.

For Rose, though, being an Eagle Scout wasn’t about showing a title to demonstrate that he has the abilities to be a leader. It was about developing himself.

“It definitely impacts me on the field,” Rose said. “The toughness, the grit… just teaching me man skills. I use those skills every day in my life.

“Once I start something, I finish it. Once I started Boy Scouts, I knew the highest rank was Eagle so I had no choice but to finish it.”

The organization runs in his family as well – Rose said he achieved that rank for his grandma and aunt, and that his brother reached the same rank of Eagle he did.

More at source:

http://www.kykernel.com/sports/uk-s-top-running-back-says-boy-scouts-taught-him/article_127259fa-ca76-11e9-9d11-b3ec2cb31aaf.html

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On 8/11/2017 at 7:15 AM, RememberSchiff said:

As I have said before, I favor a solo Eagle trek over an Eagle project.

I talked to someone a few years ago that ran an optional program for older scouts: 24 hours in the woods, tending a fire, no talking, only water to drink. I thought it would be great to do for older scouts. I talked to a few adults and they were not supportive. I think the scouts would have really gotten a lot out of it.

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20 minutes ago, MattR said:

I talked to someone a few years ago that ran an optional program for older scouts: 24 hours in the woods, tending a fire, no talking, only water to drink. I thought it would be great to do for older scouts. I talked to a few adults and they were not supportive. I think the scouts would have really gotten a lot out of it.

Alone or with other scouts? I could see the no talking part as the challenge.

Barry

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MattR said:

I talked to someone a few years ago that ran an optional program for older scouts: 24 hours in the woods, tending a fire, no talking, only water to drink. I thought it would be great to do for older scouts. I talked to a few adults and they were not supportive. I think the scouts would have really gotten a lot out of it.

I agree Matt, the scouts would have really benefited. 

Alas, adventures like these are routinely quashed by hand-wringing adults who tend to view all scouts as cubs, regardless of age or capability.

Edited by desertrat77

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2 hours ago, Eagledad said:

Alone or with other scouts? I could see the no talking part as the challenge.

Alone, with only their thoughts as they watch one full cycle of day to night to day. I should also add no electronics or books or toys of any type. The challenge is much like meditation, keeping your mind quiet is surprisingly difficult. Keeping at one simple task for a whole day, without falling asleep, is also difficult.

 

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