Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RememberSchiff

Individual Scout Accounts Part Trois

Recommended Posts

If an ISA represents cash that be drawn upon, especially if it can be transferred to other units, then it doesn't matter how good the treasurer is. These funds need to be kept in a separate bank account separate from the unit's bank account. The principle of commingling is as follows:

 

"Trustees, guardians or lawyers holding client funds have a duty not to commingle those funds with their own, since commingling is generally prohibited as a conflict of interest. Use of commingled funds for an investment, even though it might benefit both the trustee and the beneficiary, is still improper. To avoid commingling, trustees, lawyers, guardians and those responsible for another's funds set up trust accounts for funds of another."

 

The troop, as fiduciary, has possession of the money belonging to minors. It then needs to be above board, and free of all suspicion. It may even need to have each ISA in its own separate bank account. However, all this is moot as Scouting.org says NO ISAs.

 

While many large non-profits go the two signatures route, issuing troop debit cards to the SM and ASMs need not mean that any one of them is going to suddenly run off to Brazil. The treasurer can maintain two accounts - the main checkbook account and a separate, secondary account he/she keeps topped up with $500 (?). We trust our kids lives to these Scouters; we can't trust them with some of our money?

 

While I can't imagine it happening, doesn't all monies held in the troop's name legally belong to the chartering organization?

 

This means the accounts the units have at the scout office/store are all illegally co-mingled? I don't see how it is any different between council and unit as it would be for unit and scout.

 

Stosh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question regarding the authority of the Institutional Head/Executive Director. My COR is a very experienced Scouter but is indisposed this weekend and not available for advise. Our unit is in the middle of a fundraiser and I have questions regarding both the allocating of available selling slots for scouts and the allocating of proceeds. The committee member that is organizing the fundraiser has not been entirely specific in answering some questions I have and it appears some scouts may be allocated more selling opportunities than others. The CO generally takes a hands off approach to the unit and I do not want to interfere and micromanage this volunteer. However is it within my right or duty to instruct this person to hold off on informing scouts/parents of their proceeds or "incentive awards" until the IH (me) and COR have had a chance to review the policies and procedures of the fundraiser ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KDD: You could have the committee member read BSA's "Product Sales Guide". It's online; it's a short, quick read

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a question regarding the authority of the Institutional Head/Executive Director. My COR is a very experienced Scouter but is indisposed this weekend and not available for advise. Our unit is in the middle of a fundraiser and I have questions regarding both the allocating of available selling slots for scouts and the allocating of proceeds. The committee member that is organizing the fundraiser has not been entirely specific in answering some questions I have and it appears some scouts may be allocated more selling opportunities than others. The CO generally takes a hands off approach to the unit and I do not want to interfere and micromanage this volunteer. However is it within my right or duty to instruct this person to hold off on informing scouts/parents of their proceeds or "incentive awards" until the IH (me) and COR have had a chance to review the policies and procedures of the fundraiser ?

 

Until BSA releases a more nuanced approah, 1-to-1 allocation of the proceeds (Johnny's sales effort resulted in X dollars, he gets X in his ISA) to individual boys is not allowed because the IRS and tax courts have issued several rulings that doing so constitutes "private benefit" to a person rather than a benefit to the troop.

 

As far as allocating sales opportunities, it should be fair.

 

If the volunteer running the fundraiser doesn't know how he/she is planning to staff it and how the proceeds will be used, then that person should figure it out before proceeding, and definitely shouldn't be giving half-baked answers to scouts and parents. As boomer said, that person should read the product sales guide: http://www.scouting.org/filestore/financeimpact/pdf/CFD-Manuals/Product_Sales_Guide.pdf

 

As for whether or not you should climb that hill, that's a political question for you that boils down to is it worth it. We can't know that ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so this discussion is a squabble about who gets the money.

 

 

But the real question should be.......

 

Should we be fundraising at all?

 

 

I disagree with fundraising to pay for scout trips......or summer camps or outings of any type.

 

Lets just say it seems fundamentally wrong.

 

 

Selling popcorn candy bars for durable good such as tents is acceptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we want to limit the program to only those families who can afford it, yours is a perfect plan. My Troop would be cut down by about 50 percent, and maybe we want a more "elite" Scouting program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A durable scout tent that is not canvas ? :) BD, I am curious why you view it as fundamentally wrong. I am coming around to the idea of no private benefit, but not sure I understand you. So the Red Cross can ask for donations to fund infrastructure but not gas to drive the van ? Marching band can raise fundraiser for instruments but not for travel costs to the competition ? Or is you position unique to Scouting ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One way or another, the fundraising is gonna happen. Either every boy will do odd jobs and pay for their own fees/gas/uniforms/awards/etc.... Then donate a bunch of hand-me-downs and spare change to any kid he knows needs it or expense that everyone at the time can pitch in. Or, the unit will maintain a large budget with accounts for each boy that enables him to see if he's done enough to cover his cost to the troop for serving in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree! A scout is thrifty, he pays his own way. Then there's the troop fund raising that covers the costs of the program and equipment, not supplemental funding of any scout's personal responsibility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One way or another' date=' the fundraising is gonna happen. Either every boy will do odd jobs and pay for their own fees/gas/uniforms/awards/etc.... Or, the unit will maintain a large budget with accounts for each boy that enables him to see if he's done enough to cover his cost to the troop for serving in it.[/quote']

Odd jobs are generally referred to as work or earnings, and not as fundraising.

If a Scout has been trained to check and see if he's done enough to cover his costs, then I think we've failed him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A durable scout tent that is not canvas ? :) BD' date=' I am curious why you view it as fundamentally wrong. I am coming around to the idea of no private benefit, but not sure I understand you. So the Red Cross can ask for donations to fund infrastructure but not gas to drive the van ? Marching band can raise fundraiser for instruments but not for travel costs to the competition ? Or is you position unique to Scouting ?[/quote']

 

 

Your comparing apples and oranges my friend......

 

Red cross, delivering blood, food or disaster supplies.........Exactly how can that even be compared to little jimmy going to Philmont or the jambo......

 

I don't agree with band fundraisers for trips either.....Uniforming and instruments OK.....That trip to march in the Disney parade well not so much. Competitions are a bit of a fuzzy line....

 

 

 

 

So why should we expect others to finance our hobby?????

 

Fundraising for an Eagle project, Ok I get it

Fundraising for Equipment that will last a generation, Ok

 

Fundraising to go to Sea Base, Philmont, Northern Tier, Jamboree.....HELL NO

 

It doesn't get any more individual benefit than paying for a trip with other peoples money.......If that doesn't rub you wrong then I need to be drinking what you are.

 

It doesn't get any more selfish than that.....

 

As blake has pointed out in other threads.....the kid should be mowing grass, raking leaves or other boy sized odd jobs to finance scouting.

 

 

When did it become the units responsibility to find money for it's boys in the unit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then the lawn service company doesn't get the job and the unskilled laborer can't feed his 6 month old child. All so this scout can enjoy his hobby. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our youth who went to Philmont and in the process (before and after) planned two multi-tiered weekend backpacking trips for our troop, crew, AND his Philmont contingent?

He payed for it by a lawn bushiness that he's kept through trade school.

 

The only difference between doing it that way vs. earning the same via an ISA: the troop got ZERO dollars from his hard work. He contributed to the life of the troop in lots of other ways (the crew, not so much ... too busy mowing lawns :p ), so nobody complained. Had he sold the enough in popcorn and other fundraisers over a couple of years to pad his ISA for the trip, the troop would have got 'bout $1K in their general fund. That's 4 camper-ships paid in full between troop and council funds.

 

Just sayin' ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Then the lawn service company doesn't get the job and the unskilled laborer can't feed his 6 month old child. All so this scout can enjoy his hobby. :)

If this lawn service company can't do a better job than some kid with a mower, they need to find another line of endeavor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Our youth who went to Philmont and in the process (before and after) planned two multi-tiered weekend backpacking trips for our troop, crew, AND his Philmont contingent?

He payed for it by a lawn bushiness that he's kept through trade school.

 

The only difference between doing it that way vs. earning the same via an ISA: the troop got ZERO dollars from his hard work. Had he sold the enough in popcorn and other fundraisers over a couple of years to pad his ISA for the trip, the troop would have got 'bout $1K in their general fund. That's 4 camper-ships paid in full between troop and council funds.

.

Hmmm, the troop as parasite; interesting model. If every Scout had their own micro-business, no-one would need camperships.

 

What does planning backpacking trips have to do with Philmont The backpacking does show leadership and character. That should not imply he somehow deserves a reward (trip to Philmont) for same.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...