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svendzoid

Getting elected to Executive board

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I was wondering what the National BSA policy is on who can serve on a councils executive board? Is there an age limit?? Any answers would be great. If you can provide actual documents or websites with information that would be great, or at least site where your information came from. Thank you!

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There is the "Council" the "Council Executive Board" and the "Council Executive Committee of the Executive Board". To understand each and their roles and responsibilities I would recommend you read two publications.

 

The Council #33071 and the Orientation Guide for Council Officers and Executive Board Members #33161.

 

Age limit is in most cases 18 or older however the council has the ability to pass their own rules to make exceptions for positions such as the OA Chief who in some councils sits on the council committee in some capacity.(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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Hey! Where did Eagle90's comment go! It was both accurate and pithy and while dollar signs might indeed be offensive to those who aren't hard core capitalists, I can't see how his post might have been construed as inappropriate.

 

Man I really dislike these disappearing posts.

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Let's be logical for a moment.

 

Who would be a better choice for the board of directors of a council.

 

Let's take a guy, an average guy, a computer weenie who barely understands the stock market, has almost nothing in the bank, drives an old car, has no connections but is an enthusiastic Scouter.

 

Let's take another man, might not be a Scouter but supports the goals of Scouting, he's President of a division of IBM, is worth millions, and knows many more millionaires who support Scouting. This man is used to forecasting the outcomes of investments and business decisions. He can call up the CEO of Toyota and say, "Hey Bob, BSA needs $250k to finish a new camp. I'm kicking in $10K, can I count on you for the same? Yeah, I'm calling Jim over at MegaBank next. Sure I'll tell him that you're down for $10K and that you expect him to match it. Thanks. See you on the links."

 

I'm voting for #2.

 

 

 

 

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Our Council has it pretty good indeed. There are a lot of high dollar folk on the Board. That I've seen more than a few of them in unit-serving positions is an additional delight.

 

You'd be surprised how many BOD folk are good and caring Scouters.

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Svendzoid, are you talking high or low end? I believe Bob White is correct that in most cases, 18 is the minimum. I have not heard of any councils enacting a mandatory "retirement" age for the board, if that's what you are asking. Is your council doing this? And if so do they have an explanation for why?

 

(This message has been edited by lisabob)

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Remember, there's a reason for 18 being the floor. It's the most common (but not only) threshold between youth membership in the program and adult membership supporting the program.

 

Some (don't know how many) Councils make exception for OA Lodge chief as needed.

 

As Lisa said, which age range are you wanting to discuss? Young or old?

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I have at times voiced my opinion about the Board that serves the Council I serve.

My main complaint has been that the Board is too big and it seems to me that a lot of people on the board are more interested in building a resume than serving the Council.

But to be fair. Or at least try and be fair.

Gold Winger does bring up several good points.

Councils do need money and having people on the board who can help in this area is a necessity.

I'm not sure if there is such a thing as an average Scouter? But from what I have seen in the area where I live. Most people get involved or return to serve as Scouter's when they have a son who joins Cub Scouts.

These people are really busy. They have young families,most have large mortgages and are at a stage of life when they seem to run all the time. Run to work, work overtime, run to PTO meetings, run to take the kids to a lot of different activities.

Those who survive? Who go on to become Boy Scout Leaders, still struggle to find time for Scouting and for their families.

Most really do enjoy the time they spend with the Scouts.

Speaking for myself.

I used Scouting as my sanctuary! My time away from all the pressures of home and Her Who Must Be Obeyed.

I, because of the way I worked and the hours I worked didn't feel I could commit to being available each and every week to be at a Troop Meeting or an event.

So I opted to serve at the District and Council level.

Over time I got to find out what I was doing!! And I like to think I got good at it!!

I was selected to serve as a District Chairman, not because of what I knew about Scouts and Scouting, but also because I was a business owner in the District. I knew the guys in the local chamber of commerce. I was able to go to them and ask for their support in things like FOS. I was also able to ask them to provide services that the Council needed. Fixing broken refrigerators at camp, installing heating and air conditioning for new buildings at camp. Providing printed headed paper for the Council, taking care of council owned vehicles. Maybe not thousands of dollars but a savings for the council.

I never really thought about the average age of the Board members.

Many of the "Non- Scouter" types were in their late 30's or early 40's. Most of the "Scouter-types" did seem a fair bit older.

These "Scouter-types" were the guys and girls who had been around Scouting for a long while. Their kids were grown and while maybe some of them felt that they were no longer up to taking on Philmont or actively serving at the unit level, still had a lot to offer in other areas.

Sure some of them seemed to want to live in the past, but most of them knew how things worked and were trying to ensure that things kept on working.

Eamonn.

 

 

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There's a list of the Executive Board in my 1936 handbook.

 

Teddy Roosevelt is listed.

 

Marshall Field, the scion of the founder of the Marshall Field's department store.

 

Thomas Watson, founder of IBM.

 

John M. Schiff's name is there, he was a notable investment banker.

 

George W. Olmsted founded the Long Island Lighting Company in 1911.

 

Walter W. Head was the President of BSA at that time and he was president and founder of the General American Life Insurance Company.

 

 

 

I could spend all day researching these names but I have to cut my grass.

 

 

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I'm looking for the lower end for age requirments. I'm 20 and want to be nominated to the executive board, however the scout executive is saying that I must be 21. However, I have also heard 18. So I was just wondering what others thought. I have not been able to find any national scouting publishings with age requirments. Any help would be great! Thanks

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Well, since my $$$$ comment was removed, let me be more specific. I was interested in the executive board and a number of years ago, I inquired how to go about it. I was told flat out that I should be prepared to donate $10,000, or have contacts who would do the same. My 40+ years in scouting meant squat. Needless to say that was above my capabilities and I remain a very happy and contented unit scouter.

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