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svendzoid

Getting elected to Executive board

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My experience with being on the Executuve Committee was very similar to Eagle90. In January it was FOS, all members expected to participate at the Board level as well as the unit level (if you were a member of a unit)

 

then in March it was a Capital Campaign that all members were expected to participate in as many Foundations require 100% participation by an organizations board before they consider a donation

 

May was United Way time, and again, as a member, it was expected that everyone give as in our area the United Way still supports Boy Scouts.

 

I had to drop membership, I was asked why and when I said I couldnt afford it, I was told that sometimes that happened and it didnt make me less of a scouter, although it did make me an Ex-member of the Committee

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OK svendzoid, so the question I have is, why do you want to be on the board? What are you hoping to influence or accomplish by becoming a board member? And do you really have the spare cash to pony up, that seems to be an unwritten expectation of E Board members (no need to answer that here, but think about it for yourself)? Most 20 year olds do not, although you may be the exception to the rule.

 

And as far as I can tell, if what you want is to make an impact on scouting on the ground in your council, there are many more direct ways to do that than being on the E Board. Work on a district or council committee, for example. So I'm wondering why you set your sights on that particular position? I'm not saying you don't have a valid reason - I just am really curious what it is.

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Lisa, I want to be elected to the executive board to offer a different and perhaps "new" outlook on different topics. As a younger person, I feel that I am more able to connect with youth in the scouting program, and this might be beneficial. After all it is only a matter of time until my generation is running scouting in my council. I think that for a board to be well rounded it must have representation from all age groups including scouts in the program and young adults from the 18-21 category. I think one of scouting's flaws is that there are no real opportunities for young men who are 18-21. (Except for venturing and being an assistant scoutmaster.) Many young men go to college and get disconnected from scouting, which is a shame because many of those young men just became eagle scouts and would be great role models on the unit, district, and council level.

And do you really have the spare cash to pony up, that seems to be an unwritten expectation of E Board members

- No, I have no money that I can just donate, at least not on the scale you are referring too. However, money isnt everything, and where is the money really spent...on the professionals?....does my troop get any?? And you said it yourself, its unwritten, because its not a requirement and one should not be elected for his lack of funds. Our council allows a maximum of 50 members on its executive board.....for the past few years I dont think there has been more then 47 members at a time on the board. Meaning that if I were elected I would not be taking up a seat of someone who could donate money. My council would not make or lose anything (financially) by having me on the board.

And as far as I can tell, if what you want is to make an impact on scouting on the ground in your council, there are many more direct ways to do that than being on the E Board. Work on a district or council committee, for example.

-I do serve on both a district and council committee. However, I am a non-voting member.

So I'm wondering why you set your sights on that particular position? I'm not saying you don't have a valid reason - I just am really curious what it is.

-I hope I have explained myself. Basically it comes down to having a well rounded and well represented executive board. Just because I am young, or have no major financial resources doesnt mean that I would make a bad board member. After all scouting promotes leadership qualities among youth; they should allow those skills and qualities to further serve scouts in the council.

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Personally I have no problem with a youth who leaves for college and focuses on their studies for a few years. Scouting was around long before they were born, it is likely to be be waiting for them still after they get their college education.

 

You don't need to be in scouting to remember the lessons you learned in Scouting. College is the time for focusing on being in college.

 

Change the world afterwards.

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Naw, just a poking a bit of fun at BW.

I think its great that someone young and energized would like to serve on the executive board of a youth organization. Actually, I think it would be great of councils reserved a few positions just for those people. But however, it seems that money talks and enthusiasm walks.

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...too bad that councils don't. Youth could probably do more for a council then money ever could. Who knows maybe i'll win the lottery...and turn the tables...

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It is not the youths' role to run a scout council or most unit programs. What national corporation can anyone name that is run by youth?

 

Nor is it mandatory to have a lot of money to be on a council board. The council, especially the council executive committee, does not deal with program decisions, they make business decisions for the corporation. That requires people with strong business knowledge. Good business people seem to make a good income...go figure.

 

Lots of those folks also have a college education...who would of thunk it?

 

A good way to prepare for service on the executive board of ANY corporation is to get a good education and get some business experience. Serving on a council committee is no different.

 

It's not a "go away kid" approach. It's a "hope you had a great time as a youth in scouts, go practice what you learned while you get an adults education, and if you choose to retun in a few years you will be better prpared to serve others as an adult" approach.

 

 

(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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20 is an adult in the eyes of BSA and the US military. Why not have a contingent of young adults serve on the board? Are they not better to judge the wants and needs of the youth served than a bunch of crotchety old men? Remember, its for the youth.

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I'm not saying that the entire board should be made up of young adults. But I see no harm in having a few young adults that are 18-21 serving on the board. If anything they will be better prepared to serve the council in years to come. Does it take 50 people with corporate and business and financial backgrounds to make good financial decisions....not really....maybe 10-15 and thats still a lot. Perhaps if Executive boards spent as much time and energy on reviewing how the program is being delivered at the unit level as they do on finances.....enrollment would increase.....more enrollment equals more money.

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"Are they not better to judge the wants and needs of the youth served..."

 

Germ, that is not the role of the council executive board.

 

Sven, as you have admitted in your opening post you know very little about the structure and role of the various levels of the Council Committee. Perhaps before you determine the potential value you would bring to the committee you should first obtain the refernece materials that were recommended to you and learn what the committees actually do?

 

Once you understand the role of the various Concil administrative levels you might have a different veiw of your involvement in it at this point of your development.

 

But until you know more about it how can you make a reasonable determination?(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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I was surprised to find that an Executive Board can be 50 people. That seems like way too many. Maybe the primary reason that they are there is for prestige and to donate money. 50 times $10,000 is a half million bucks.

 

Since Scouts don't generate revenue for the Council by paying dues, that $.5 million would require a lot of popcorn sales.

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The purpose of the executive board is to run the business end of the council and to make it as profitable and well organized as possible from the business end of scouting. They help with funding council facilities ,such as camps, tapping into the well to do business community who can provide the big money. That is why in most councils the exec board is made up of well to do professional people with a good network of contacts. Usually they are hand picked by the SE to insure the business remains solvent. That is why very few scouting volunteers are on most boards, since very few of us are that well connected and tend to be too blue collar for this group. It is a board whose members have deep pockets and can drop $5,000 or more a time without batting an eye. As Bob said they have very little to do with program, they do what they do best, raising corporate dollars.

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