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PETAL_MS_SCOUTER

Cell Phones at Summer Camp

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KF5WT,

 

Methinks you need a few courses in law. Misrepresenting the facts will not win a case when the other side has access to the complete document.

 

Suggesting that an item can be used as part of an Emergency Kit is not tantamount to recommending or requiring that such devices be carried as a matter of course.

 

I hope when you get to college you take up law because it sounds like you have a budding interest. In the meantime, try to tone down the theatrics, they will not serve you well as an adult.

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Lynda et al,

 

I would tell you that if you tell the scout to put the phone away , that is the limit of what you can do. Taking the phone is considered stealing if the parents want to push the issue.

 

 

If you don't think so, just ask your local police chief or your CO's lawyer. Taking property from scouts that is not considered dangerous is theft, plain and simple. If a parent gives thier child a phone for emergencies, who are you to say they can't have it?

 

Why pray tell do adults have a thing about youth having a cell phone, but see nothing wrong with an adult having one. Someone want to try explaining that one?

 

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Since we established that it is not stealing because Scoutmasters are acting as Guardians of the scouts, and that safety regulations are met if Adults have Cell Phones, the real question should be, what need would a scout have for a cell phone? What purpose would it serve besides a distraction?

 

None.(This message has been edited by DugNevius)

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Dug

sorry your dead wrong on this about the SM having the right to confiscate items that are not dangerous or life threatening. There is nothing illegal about a cell phone, and you are NOT the guardian according to the law.

 

You don't have to beleive me ask your local police department or ask your CO's lawyer.

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Nldscout,

You seem sure enough of your self that I'll take your word for it. But since I don't sneak into their tent and remove an item I don't have to worry either.

 

My authority is not based on the leagle system. I'm more of a you can follow the rules or you can go home type of guy. If they were told no cell phones and were found with one they would be offered a chance to leave it in the car rather than using it to call for a ride home.

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Would it be possible to stop beating a dead horse?

 

This thread is starting to look like the western front at its most stagnant.

 

I think both sides have dug their trenches, strung their barbed wire, and sighted in their machine guns. Now all you need to do is harden the lines of communications and pre-plan your artillery fire for the next time the other side desides to try going over the wire...

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Well the horse doesn't mind. LOL.

 

nldscout. In my legal opinion (I have legal training, but I am not a member of the BAR), you are wrong and here is why.

 

When an SM, or anyone else confiscates a banned item (safety related or not) he or she is not taking it, it must be given. Essentially, the SM is asking the boy to turn it over. If the boy refuses, the SM has other alternatives (a Scout is Obedient, right?) such as sending him home. When you sign up for camp, you agree to follow the rules. If the SM is sneaking in and taking things, that is a different story.

 

note: some states may have obscure legal precedent that would change this, but not likely.

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Would it be possible to stop beating a dead horse?

Uh no, it is what we do best!

 

My sons troop also had a no electronics policy except for flashlights. So I started confiscating watches. Boy did that tee some people off. I also took the SPLs alarm clock away from him, he said that he needed it to make sure he got up in the morning to get the troop up, I told him he should have brought a wind up model, so he would not be violating the great troop policy. The troop no longer has a no electronics policy, I am not quite sure why?

 

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In our case, the policy is one of the Council Camp, not any troop.

 

Scouts are specifically prohibited from having most electronics, including cell phones.

 

 

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Torveaux

Maybe its just New York that has obscure laws, but then again its New York.

 

But we don't worry too much about it because up here in the adirondaks cell phone work so litttle they are hardly worth worrying about. Now if the New York city liberal tree huggers would leave the upsate residents alone we might get the cell companies to put in a few more towers. But thats a rant for another day!

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A hearty AMEN to that.

 

I don't even know if I have a solid opinion on whether they should be banned or by whom.

 

In general I figure that the whole point of camping is to get away from the 'hustle and bustle' and get closer to God (or nature if you prefer). A week or so without video games or cell phones would make sense to me.

 

Ultimately, I would like to see the SPL and the PLC make the call for the troop and have them make the tough call rather than the popular one. I would suggest that the rule be that cell phones can come along, but they are only to be turned on in an emergency. Any non-emergency use of the cell phone would lead to some form of punishment up to an including expulsion from camp. (though I am sure the boys can come up with some good alternatives)

 

On a side note: We live in a hilly region of Wisconsin and even though it is a city, our reception is intermittent at best unless we are on the highway.

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Scouts are specifically prohibited from having most electronics.

 

I would be fun to see that list! NO really I would not find holes in it!

Or is the policy worded just like that. Leaving the decision of what most is to each individual, as they see fit. So that each counselor or camp person can say, that is a most electrical thingie give it to me?

 

 

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Sorry, the bad wording was mine, I was being lazy. The emphasis I was trying to convey was that the camp prohibits certain items to Scouts, but not necessarily in general. The expectation is that the adults will have access to emergency devices such as cell phones.

 

Here is the wording as written in the Camp's Leader guide.

 

"Prohibited Items

 

- for health and safety reasons the following items are prohibited at camp:

 

- Fireworks, Firecrackers, smoke bombs, etc.

- Firearms and ammunition (except as provided by the camp)

- Sheath knives

- Pets

- Aerosol cans

- Any other item that could be deemed to jeopardize the safety of Scouts and others.

- Scouts are not allowed to have the following items in camp: Radios, CD Players, video games, cell phones, beepers, scanners, etc."

 

Also later there is a statement specifically about music. "Any complaints of inappropriate music being played in camp will result in the confiscation of the music (CDs/Tapes, etc.) and audio instruments for the remainder of the week."

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The camp I go to just put in a cell phone tower last year because reception was so bad. If that's not promoting, I don't know what is.

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"If that's not promoting, I don't know what is."

 

Putting in a cell tower is not the same as promoting the idea of Scouts taking the phones to camp. As mentioned earlier, the phones CAN be a great safety device, but it does not follow that adding a tower is related to having Scouts carry phones. Having better reception helps the camp staff and leadership provide a safer environment. It can also provide an improved method for emergency contacts with the adult leadership of each Troop in case of a family emergency. If the contact stays through the adult leadership, the boys are more easily weaned off of the apron strings (and vice versa).

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