Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
yarrow

What's your biggest problem?

Recommended Posts

Know it all old Scouters.

Who have years and years "On the job"

But somehow they have never managed to get it Right.

You can tell who they are when you hear things like:

I know what the book says but...

Training is ok but...

Spent all that money on a uniform....

YOU, YOU AND YOU ARE DOING THE.... MERIT BADGE.

Council and District are ok but we....

 

The list could go on, but you get the idea.

We have a program that works, if we let it and work with it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the biggest problem I've had is older scouters being somewhat condescending to me, given my relative age. I'm 30, which isn't young, but it does put one on the lower end of the average age at summer camp. I think I was the second-youngest participant in our Wood Badge course.

 

Anyhow, I've learned to resist the temptation to point to my Eagle square knot when older scouters try to get a little preachy about the program, and have just tried to exercise the Scout Law (especially that one about being courteous) the best that I can. The important thing to keep in mind is that us younger scouters will one day be older scouters...and when we get there, hopefully we'll have the wisdom to listen to what some of the young bucks have to say.

 

Not so sage words from a Good Old Eagle Too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adults who don't get trained, and adults who are trained but don't follow the program. Nothing yanks my chain like seeing boys leave the program, before they age out, because of a weak scout program.

 

A friendly bit of advice from a veteran scouter to a future veteran scouter, goodoldeagle2. I wouldn't recommend you flash your Eagle knot as a symbol of anything other than being an Eagle Scout. The skills that made Michael Jordan a fabulous player did nothing for him as a general manager. The skills that brought you to Eagle as a youth are not the skills that will make you a good scout leader as an adult.

 

It's wonderful to see you return to the program as an adult. But it's a different program on this side of the fence. It is neither age or youth that makes a good scout leader. It is the ability to understand and deliver the scouting program that matters.

 

Bob White

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not my problem per se but it does aggrevate me: Scouts who take a position of responsibility because they need it to advance but then don't do the job.

 

My biggest problem is moronic parents.

 

Example 1: Mom who thinks that we're "punishing" her son by not letting him advance with the Scouts his age "just because" he hadn't completed the requirements. The fact that the other Scouts his age range in rank from 2nd class to Star is irrelevant.

 

Example 2: The mom that goes on the campouts and then follows the son around, "helping" him with whatever he is supposed to be doing.

 

Example 3: The father who doesn't understand why the adults don't MAKE other Scouts help his son, who overpacks for every outing, carry his gear. Every couple months we have the same discussion, if his son needs or wants help, he can ask the other Scouts and if they are willing to help, they may. Dad doesn't like this because no one wants to help Junior anymore because he continues to overpack. We've explained this to Dad but he says that Junior insists that he needs EVERYTHING. He brings a folding cot!

 

Example 4: The mom that told her said that he could have a propane heater in his tent because SHE said that it was okay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" I wouldn't recommend you flash your Eagle knot as a symbol of anything other than being an Eagle Scout."

 

I'll go along here as well (wow! twice in one day). The youth in any program, or maybe the participants in any program, often have little or no idea of the goals, motivations, reasons, etc.. behind the program, decisions, and policies.

 

However, you experiences as Scout should make you a valuable resource because you might remember things that were tried but you, as a Scout, found them to be "lame."

 

Just remember, that if you look closely at the chest of many of these old Scouters, you'll see the the Red, White, and BLue knot of an Eagle Scout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our biggest problem.... the scout that "has issues" with peer leadership and his parents that want us to accommodate that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pompous know-it-all Scouters!

Parents who think their kid should "get it" just because.

 

Ed Mori

1 Peter 4:10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Professionals who "take over" and do the jobs of the volunteers, because it's not being done "their way" or at the rate they think it should be done.

 

Volunteers who think "the Professionals work for us."

 

Council Executive Boards who let the SE dictate to them.

 

Old Scouters who are still in it for the "social club", sit around with a coffee cup, getting in the way, and doing nothing to help the boys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who do you believe the professionals work for scoutldr? I believe yarrow's question was addressed to new scouters or scouts so I will refrain from answering his question.(This message has been edited by acco40)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a new Scouter, my biggest problem was getting information. I was asked to register in a unit, but I was not given anything to do. I have asked periodically if there are ways in which I might help (other than fundraising or outings--I'm involved in both with Cub Scouting right now--and I did say this up front prior to registering), and there's been nothing to do. I guess I just don't know where I fit in.

 

As a parent to a new Scout, my biggest problem has been getting information. Hmmmmm.... :) Seriously, it is not unusual for a camping trip to be planned with only two weeks' notice, and that is hard when there are other things that we do outside of Scouting. Also, I hear things that take place that concern me, for they don't seem appropriate for Scouting. Knowing how to tactfully address issues within the troop that effect my son is tough.

 

As a new Scout, my son found his biggest problem to be a lack of patrols (he identified that as something that sounds cool but that they don't have) and some of the older boys who smoke and curse.

 

All of that said, I feel that I should say we all love Scouting, think the SM and other leaders are very committed to doing their best in all areas, but understand that the unit is not perfect...just as we aren't.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a relatively new scouter, my biggest challenge has been to try and help rehabilitate a troop that had lost it's way from the inside out. I kind of envy SM41's thread about starting a new troop. I wonder if that would be easier.

 

When my son and I first joined the troop, it had just changed scoutmasters. The SM for the previous 4 years had been very very hands off, rationalizing everything was boy led. Well as far as I could tell, his definition of boy led was 0 adult effort or input. The result was meetings that were kaos and campouts that were little more than take the kids into the woods and let them run around all weekend. (I know this only because my older son started with the troop during this time and he and his entire Webelos den that crossed over that year, quit within three months. At that time I was not in a position to participate as much as I would have liked to.) The first campout I went on with the troop, park rangers came to our campsite to ask that our scouts be a little more subdued for the benefit of others in the camping area. The campsite was going to be left a mess but I finally stepped in and said something. We actually formed a police line and picked up the trash. I was amazed this group had never done this outside of summer camp, where camp staff made them do it.

 

Fortunately, the group of parents that came in with the class of Webelos a year ahead of my younger son, and his class have been active and have helped the troop stablize and begin to grow again. But while they are active and enthusiatic, none had participated in scouts as a youth. I'll admit that initially we probably took over more control of the troop than adults should have, but we had an entire generation of scouts that had never experienced an organized troop meeting or campout outside of summer camp. Not suprisingly, the activity the scouts liked the most was summer camp, that did have an organized structure and planned activities for the scouts. Some of the more active adults are now particpating in District training programs and we're getting better. It hasn't helped that our district is not the stongest. As I noted in another thread, no list of MB counselors, and the training schedule is pretty thin. But there is new leadership there as well and some things seem to be improving.

 

This past year we have begun having the boys do more. Fortunately they elected a good, organized SPL this year, the first SPL in three years we won't have to change out mid year for participation or disciplinary reasons. We continue to improve, but we have a way to go yet. The next challenge that I see on the horizon it the fact that some parents and the scouts have started to become satisfied with the status quo. I'll admit that where we are now is lot better than where we were two years ago, but I also know we have further to go. While I initially got involved in the troop to help ensure my son had a positive experience, I'm now a Barry convert, I love this scouting stuff!

 

Thanks to all of you for posting issues and answers. Even in the disagreements I learn alot from this forum.

 

SA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Volunteers who think "the Professionals work for us."

 

Council Executive Boards who let the SE dictate to them"

 

Read the thread in the council relations forums about my view and what examples i sihgted within my council and you'll know what my opinion is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I did Fast Start or Scoutmastership Fundamentals, but I was wondering if anyone has any thoughts on a transitional-type training for the leader who is going from Cubs to Scouts. I've seen former Cubmasters and Den Leaders make the move up to Scouts, but they retain the "adult-led" methodology of Cubs.

 

Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

goodoldeagle2: I wonder if is already covered in Webelos Den Leader training? Anyone know? That would seem the place for it to happen, considering it's a transition time. If not, I vote for a training to help us make that adjustment. I have taken Webelos Den Leader Fast Start, but all other trainings were geared to CM or were supplemental in nature. This is a hard transition unless it is clearly understood (something I'm still working on understanding as I assist our Webelos II den). It's been hard for our den leaders to go from Cubs to Webelos, and Webelos to Scouts is even greater a transition. One thing is certain: I took CM training and my husband took SM training--they were SO different in every way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×