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Which Eagle do you regard higher?

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  • #16
    Flame time. Just because a boy puts on a Boy Scout uniform. Yes, he has done all that is required, the shirt with all the patches, belt, pants, socks, maybe a hat and necker. He has all the check boxes filled out on the Inspection Sheet. Does that make him a Boy Scout? Or are there other factors that come to play beyond the requirements? Well, what about when they pin an Eagle medallion on him? He, too, has all the check boxes filled in....

    If all the boy has to do to reach the goal is make the trek from Scout to Eagle, that's fine, but is it the patch at the end or journey that makes the difference? Are we making too much ado about the patch instead of the journey?

    Stosh

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    • Basementdweller
      Basementdweller commented
      Editing a comment
      Most get lost on the journey, a shame they didn't spend a bit more time learning their compass skills.

  • #17
    It's how the Eagle lives his life after the court of honor that matters most. Whatever path he took to earn it--hands-off parents, or parents dragging him by the collar thru the ranks, or the extra scrutiny as the SM's kid--it's all challenging, just in different ways.

    As I look back, my parents were supportive but hands-off, but I always felt bad for the kid with the pushy parents. Those kids never had a chance to breathe and were forever being hit over the head with the scout handbook by mummy/daddy. They earned Eagle whether they wanted to or not, but they sure didn't seem that happy when they did. In fact, we all know a few that purposely sabotaged earning Eagle, just because.
    Last edited by desertrat77; 01-20-2014, 09:42 PM.

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    • #18
      It's kinda like the two Eagles (brothers) that I know of that mom kept a day-planner for each of the boys and got them to where they belonged. If asked if they were planning on getting to a scout event, they had to ask mom to check their calenders to make sure the schedule was free. Kinda makes one wonder how well that worked for character/leadership development. Of course dad was an Eagle, too. I wonder if his mom kept his schedule too.

      Stosh

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      • #19
        It really depends on the Troop. It is sad to say, but there are situations when a scout "earns" his eagle on paper and was not given the full oportunity or challange to earn his Eagle the proper way. It is sad to think that there are "eagle" mills that truly undermind the entire program by handing out rank automaticly.

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        • #20
          Originally posted by Horizon View Post
          Thinking about this again. I do love the slaps at 13 year old Eagles, since I was one (a month before my 14th Birthday). Nothing like telling a committed Scout he is not good enough.
          I will admit that I am suspect of very young Eagles not based on the boys, but based on how I know too many troops operate poorly to facilitate young Eagles.
          That said, I get a kick out of people who believe that boys who earn Eagle before their first shave are "too immature" or too this or not enough that given that the 17-yr-old Eagle is a recent development. The average age of an Eagle in 1947 was 14.6 Average is everyone taken together, so that's a LOT of 13-yr-olds bringing that number down compared to today's average of 17.1. (source)

          Frankly, you could argue that it is mature, driven, qualified boys who set a goal and meet it early, and immature, poorly-prepared boys who are finishing their project 2 years after the last time they went camping and earning the rank 5 minutes before their 18th birthday.

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          • desertrat77
            desertrat77 commented
            Editing a comment
            Well said....

        • #21
          Neither.

          "A boy may wear all the scout uniforms made, all the scout badges ever manufactured, know all the woodcraft, campercraft, scoutcraft and other activities of boy scouts, and yet never be a real boy scout. To be a real boy scout means the doing of a good turn every day with the proper motive and if this be done, the boy has the right to be classsed with the great scouts that have been of such great service to their country." -J. Alexander

          as written in the 1911 Handbook for Boys
          Last edited by DuctTape; 01-25-2014, 07:47 AM.

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          • #22
            In the end, the scout does the work and earns the word regardless of whether parents are involved or not. It the parents do the work for the scout he isn't going to make it to Eagle.

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