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boleta

SPL in distress

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I think I have picked up the signal...

 

"I have now watched 4 or 5 SPLs with the same"...

 

'patch and I think that each one should have their own. What do I do?'

 

This may not be correct but it is as good as I could do, given my equipment.

 

So, my answer is to buy another patch. They are fairly inexpesnive and can be found at most Scout Stores. I hope this helps to reduce your distress. This does seem to be a problem easily untangled but who am I to judge?

 

FB

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I could have interpreted the intercepted message wrong. An alternative reading of it might be:

 

I have now watched 4 or 5 SPL's with the same...bandanas over their heads coming this direction and I am distressed. What do I do?

 

I would suggest making arrangements for a general PLC with the proper amount of refreshments.

 

It still doesn't make sense to me why so many SPL's would be converging at the same time unless it was time to plan for a Camporee. The theme might be Cops and Robbers. I don't know maybe they are not really SPL's but then where did they get those patches, probably at the Scout Store as suggested in the earlier post.

 

still confused,

 

FB

 

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I think I have finally figured it out.

 

I have now watched 4 or 5 SPLs with the same...

 

Boleta was in a hurry and substituted the word "with" for the words "that are".

 

My suggestion is to have an election. I think this finally solves a most distressing problem. Good luck in the future.

 

FB

 

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Sorry about that.

 

I was at the hospital when I posted and it cut me off. The Venturing Crew took me out of town.

 

Several SPLs have had the same problem with controlling behavior at the troop meetings. They are tired of putting "signs up" repeatedly throughout the meeting and a 40 minute program takes an hour and a half. Even a good program is difficult to deliver when there are constant interruptions.

 

I have heard about a discipline program where a system similar to soccer is used. Disruptive behavior (such as interrupting) results in a yellow card warning. 3 yellow cards in a meeting results in expulsion from the meeting. A blue card is given for more serious problems (such as violations of the Oath and Law). A Red card is given for serious problems such as profanity or fighting and result in immediate expulsion from a meeting. All of these incidents would be reviewed by the Troop Committee.

 

I have heard that this system can be run by the youth without adult involvement but do not know anyone who has used it. Please don't tell me, train them properly in the first place. All of these SPLs have been through JLT and Pathfinders with continued frustrations at meetings.

 

What do the Forum members recommend? Without adults running the meeting or constantly stepping in to restore order, how do your SPLs control the chaos? Input from the SPLs who read this would be helpful.

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",,,and a 40 minute program takes an hour and a half."

 

Hi Boleta,

 

This is a problem we are having lately as well, and meeting content seems to be the major cause.

 

The boys should have about 2 hours worth of meeting planned, to leave them wanting more, and with a level of excitement towards next weeks program.

 

Another problem we are having is the same old opening week in and week out. Mix it up to eliminate boredom.

 

Boredom at any stage of the meeting, brings out inappropriate behavior in boys.

 

Having the boys remain at attention following the opening can bring a level of formality to their receiving the instructions needed for the meeting. These instructions should be quick and to the point.

 

Finally, your SPL needs to remember, it is not his responsibility to make sure that all of the boys are behaving themselves. It is the responsibility of the Patrol Leaders. The SPL is responsible for the behavior of the PLs, assisting the PLs with problems AFTER they ask, and running a timely, exciting meeting.

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Hi All

 

Ask your SPL what he wants from the group. I know it seems simple, but I find most youth leaders want respect without really understanding that requires them to demand it. I ask them, what is the best way to have an orderly meeting? Take out the annoying part. If a scout is disrupting the meeting, take control and explain he has a choice, if he doesnt want to be in the meeting and is going to continue to disrupt it, he can leave. Otherwise he can stay and help with the meeting. If the scout disrupts the meeting again, and they usually do at first, the SPL then ask them to leave the room. He can ask the scout to find the SM and explain why he was asked to leave. Or the SPL can ask the scout to wait in the hall until after the meeting so they can talk. Just get the annoyance out of the meeting.

 

This type of control requires no yelling, no deal making (three strikes or soccer cards) and none of this holding signs up for 45 minutes. You make your point, move the annoyance out of the meeting and get on with it. If the scout who is asked to leave misses something important, he needs make it up at a time.

 

Part of the problem Ive noticed is scouts feel they need permission to give discipline. You do that by giving some of these simple ideas.

 

The scout-sign should never be use to control a crowd, only for getting attention. If the adults or scouts have to keep using it over and over, it has lost it respect and something else needs to be done. By the way, in our troop the adults usually wait for a youth leader raises his sign. If the group is slow to respond to the sign, then each member of the PLC is expected to help control the group by walking over to a near by disruptive scout asking for his attention. If the scout continues to disrupt, the youth leader quietly leads the scout out of the room to have a talk. The SPL should never have to stand long trying to get attention. Troop discipline is every scouts job, so every youth leader needs to work together with the SPL.

 

Hope this helps a little. I found it took about a year before our PLC had real control with misbehavoir, whether it was a PLC meeting or a troop meeting. We found the Patrol Meeting went better as well. I would walk down the hall and see a scout waiting for the Patrol Meetings to finish and I got to have a little conference. And they say adults have nothing to do in a boy run troop.

 

I love this scouting stuff.

 

Barry

 

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Hospital, being cut off, are you OK? Was it the SPL?

 

 

To know how to respond (to the real problem), I would need to know more about your/their meetings.

 

You do sound like you are ready for a change. I wouldn' subscribe to the Soccer score method first.

 

FB

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We have a large troop and a new SPL.

Troop has had long-standing problem with continued talking and noise during announcements, etc. SPL tried a new tactic this week - he kept track of all the wasted time and made them all sit perfectly quiet for the same amount of time before the closing. (Fortunately, it was only a minute or so.) He got lots of positive feedback in post-PLC.

 

I'm making him a copy of this thread to pass on some of the other great ideas y'all had.

 

-mike

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I think that the Scout Sign is a wonderful tool,when it is used right.

You or who ever needs to explain how to use it.When the "Sign is up" EVERYONE is to be quite. Everyone means everyone, adults as well.The sign is a message from me to you. You are responsible for you. Yelling "Sign's up" is not an option, so don't do it. The sign should remain up until everyone is quite. Once everyone is quite, thank them. A standard line that we used to use back home was "Thank You, as you know I'm very polite and I refuse to talk when you are talking. I know that you are as polite as I am."

When planning the meetings have a couple of back up activities ready. Things that can be brought up quickly and need little explanation or equipment. The entire meeting needs to have a flow to it. Very often things get out of hand when there are lulls. Use quite games to bring the Scouts down after something that was loud and boisterous.

The PLC might want to look at a ongoing inter patrol competition, with points given for whatever they decide. Some things that come to mind are:Attendance and uniform. The SPL could deduct points for un-Scout like behavior. We had a patrol of the month neckerchief which was greatly prized.

After a meeting that hasn't gone well you and the members of the PLC might want to do a reflection on why it didn't go well and then work on how to make it go better.

Eamonn

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I have to question where your SM is if you are having challenges. There is a chain of command in Scouting. It is there to use and as a protection for its leaders both youth and adult. If a youth member cannot resolve behavior problems of youth members then its time for the Scoutmaster to step in and deal with the problem.

The first issue is program. If you are running a good program that interests the Scouts discipline problems will be limited. They will naturally want to pay attention. If your program is mediocre then that is your problem not discipline.

If you have "problem scouts" and I have certainly seen a few after too many years as a Scoutmaster you need to deal with them through the chain. First Patrol Leaders trying to deal with them, troop guides, ASPL finally SPL . If the scouts cannot resolve the problem then the adults need to step in.

A Scoutmaster's conference with the offender- If that does not work a Board of Review- If that doesn't work or if an offender is being totally out of control or a hazard to himself or others its time to send him home.

If there are constant problems from a scout a meeting with the Scoutmaster and Committee Chairmanm and the Scout and his parents is the next step. Perhaps even a probation period. If that does not work then finally expulsion from the Troop.

This last week we finally had to pull the plug on a scout who just wasn't getting the picture. The measure I used was this- His behavior had gotten to the point that it was having an adverse effect on other Scouts. He was affecting the program of the troop so negatively and so constantly that there was no longer any benefit of his presence.

This determination belongs with adults not scouts. I think I heard an audible sigh of relief from the Troop Leaders Council when we reached this decision.

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I believe the problem also lies in boredom. In the past, most SPL's seemed to just waste time during meetings talking about things that 1/2 the guys already knew or had no interest in (Often things that did not benefit them). When I was elected to the position, I tried to do Eagle required merit badges at the meetings while the younger guys worked on advancement with people who already had that badge. I had almost no problems with uncooperative behavior as people were eager to go forward with their advancement. The one guy who didn't go with the program had to be removed from the troop for his uncooperative and sometimes violent behavior.

 

It is a bit of a strain on resources, but it really helped my troop out.

 

Also make sure the patrol leaders do their jobs. Responsable ones are good for gathering information about what their patrols want to be doing.(This message has been edited by Sovremenny)(This message has been edited by Sovremenny)

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