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HiLo

An Aussie Signs On

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Hello all. Just discovered this site and thought I'd join in too. It's great to see a forum dedicated to Scouting.

 

I'm Group Leader of the Mooroolbark Scout Group on the outer eastern edge of Melbourne, Australia. Are there many other Australians involved in the forum?

 

I've just got home from our aluminium can collection cage which we run as a fund raising activity, and as a promotional billboard in the centre of town because our Scout Hall is tucked away out of sight in the back blocks of our town.

 

Hoping I might get to the snow tomorrow for some cross country skiing. Despite the image of Australia being hot and sunny, I live reasonably close to the area where it snows a bit and skiing has been a traditional Scouting activity in these parts. (Oh, I'm sure most of you realise it's winter here right now.) I have a an additional Scouting leadership qualification to take groups ski touring. It helps keep an old bloke like me fit.

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Welcome to the list! I am from Las Vegas NV USA.

 

If you like to chat I also recommend you check out ScoutLink a nice web based chat is available at: http://insanescouter.org/chat'>http://insanescouter.org/chat (it is java based).

 

 

Scott Robertson

http://insanescouter.org

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Welcome to our site here in USA ! This is about the only Scout related site, where we don't censor each other on their views. , You will find many of us here, who speak our minds. We have the professionals and the volunteers who are dedicated to the Scouting program, sometimes we agree, and sometimes we don't. I have been in Australia, many moons ago, and I tried to go skiing, but there was no snow over the mountain(ha,ha),so I went back to the States. Welcome to put in your views, jambo

 

 

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Yes Jambo. Our snow isn't what you would call totally reliable. All the major resorts have big snowmaking operations now. But that doesn't work for the cross country / ski touring scene, so we depend on nature. (Just like a lot of Scouting!) This year has been an excellent season after a disastrous one last year.

 

And yes, I noticed a few people really speaking their minds. Refreshing! Maybe we could have a thread on climate change. That usually brings out a few strong opinions! ;-)

 

 

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Welcome,

 

While I've never been to Australia, my brother does live in Alice Springs, NT. He and his family were there for 3 years, spent a couple of years back in the U.S., and now have been back in Australia for the past 2 years. I'm sure Alice Springs is quite different than Melbourne, as far as climate is concerned.

 

I hope you enjoy the forums here, I'd like to learn some about your Scouting program.

 

ASM59

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ASM59 - I've never been to the USA either, but we Aussies feel we know a fair bit about your culture from what TV tells us, although I know that's not always the most reliable source. In my case I have the added advantage of having a daughter who works in the snow sports industry and spends most (of your) winters in the US and naturally tells us lots of stories. Up until now she has worked in West Virginia. This year she is heading to Heavenly resort on Lake Tahoe. Obviously she loves your country because she keeps going back!

 

Yes, Alice Springs is a lot different to Melbourne, although it can get cold there in winter. I recall my nieces enthusiastically showing me a photo of their dad's underpants frozen by frost on the washing line when they visited there a while ago.

 

I think we live in a great place for Scouting. We're on the edge of a major city (20 miles from the centre) but very close to all sorts of bush experiences. Plenty of bush walking and camping opportunities within a short drive. Our Scouts, a pretty young troop at present, will be doing a hike in a couple of weeks along a nearby "rail trail", an abandoned railway line turned into a great walking trail that starts about three miles away and heads up the Yarra Valley. They will walk for about 8 miles with backpacks then camp the night at the home of one of our leaders who lives out that way and has a bit of space on his property. It will be the first experience of that kind for most of them. Will be interesting to watch.

 

Next weekend I get to help on a Cub sleepover. Must make sure I have the ear plugs ready so that at least I can get some sleep!

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HiLo,

 

One other question. I've heard about "Bunny Bashing" as an activity that sometimes youth participate in out in the bush, well at least something that they used to do in the past. Have you ever heard about it? Are the bunnies still a problem?

 

ASM59

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Ha ha ha. No, I haven't heard specifically of "Bunny Bashing". It sounds like something I'd discourage, but have to admit that rabbits are still a significant pest in many parts of this country. Introduced and feral animals are a huge issue in Australia.

 

For those unaware, rabbits are not native to Australia and when they were introduced (1850s I think) they thrived, destroying grasslands and replacing other animals in their habitat right across the continent. In my own neighbourhood they seem to be reasonably controlled by foxes. Unfortunately the foxes (also introduced) are seen as a pest by anyone who keeps poultry.

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G'day cobber!!

 

at last someone else here who I might be able to understand without scratching my head.

 

No - seriously the terminology in BSA is a bit different. Not to worry the people here are pretty helpful and understanding when I post way off the mark.

 

I'm a GL in NE NSW. Was SL here for 6 yrs prior and ASL at various places for another 10 yrs before that.

 

Good to meet you. I'm not around this site much at present. Work, family, study - you know how it goes. If you want me probably best to personal message me

 

see ya

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G'day ozemu. Too right. I won't be offended if you call me a silly old bastard for choosing to be a GL!

 

But yes, one really discover the language and cultural differences on the web. I know that on this site I can't talk about putting the esky in my boot when we're packing for a camp.

 

But it's a world wide movement and we all need to make that effort to communicate.

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Well done Vicki (in Missouri)!

 

You must have had some positive cross cultural experience. :-)

 

I'm enjoying these forums, learning more about what's the same and what's different in our two countries' approaches to Scouting. Very valuable.

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Greetings, HiLo, from the Maine Wilderness.

 

I've got a few penpals down your way originally from the Blue Mountains area, currently in Sydney and soon to move..drat can't recall where. They are not in scouting, but they have sent me some beautiful scout patches/crests/badges from down there. I've sent them Moxie and real Maine maple syrup and then they've sent me (drool) TimTams...half a case. That was 2 years back and I've been stingy with'em. But I'm down to my last package. Guess I'll have to send them another shipment of Maine maple syrup. :)

 

I wonder how many other non-Aussies on the forums know what TimTams are.

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Oh, and I forgot...

 

HiLo wrote:

"...we Aussies feel we know a fair bit about your culture from what TV tells us, although I know that's not always the most reliable source."

 

Very unreliable. If Americans believed everything on TV, then we'd think that every Aussie drives a Subaru Outback (LL Bean Edition) as endorsed by Paul Hogan and drinks Fosters Beer (which my Aussie friends tell me isn't Australian for "Beer" but for something that can't be printed politely on this discussion board). :)

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Wow. What a cultural exchange. Moxie and Maine maple syrup for Tim Tams. Yep, historically Australians stationed overseas have sought out Vegemite, our unique spread for toast, sandwiches, flavouring stews, building bonnie babies and everything else. Most non-Aussies hate the stuff. I think you have to be weaned from mother's breast directly onto it, then it becomes a lifelong craving. But it is surprisingly available wherever Aussies seem to go these days.

 

But Tim Tams. That's another story. Not so easily available. (They don't travel as well I guess. And hot weather could be a killer.) A bit newer than Vegemite. My two adult daughters who travel a bit seek those in the survival packs we have to send.

 

Shall we educate the masses? Here is the Wikipedia definition: "A Tim Tam is composed of two layers of chocolate malted biscuit, separated by a light chocolate cream filling, and coated in a thin layer of textured chocolate." I think most people will have a picture by now!

 

I'd never heard of Moxie, so I looked it up. Now I must get some! And I'm sure you'll tell me that real Maine maple syrup is the best in the world, despite all those Canadian claims.

 

Subarus? Well, they ARE practical for Scouting activities. Nice on snowy roads, which you'll notice is one of my favourite destinations. When all my kids are home, three of the five cars parked in the driveway are Subies! Just farewelled my wife and one daughter heading to the snow this weekend in daughter's Subaru for a big XC skiing festival. No Outbacks here though.

 

And yes, beer fashion dictates that Fosters is not popular in Australia right now. VB, or Victoria Bitter seems to be the in-beer right now.

 

Most Aussies respect Paul Hogan for what he's done as an entertainer, actor and advertiser, but no, most of us aren't like that. We're generally not like Steve Irwin either. Most of us live in or near the big cities, within 30 miles of the coast. Fortunately that leaves the big outback space in the centre that available to us all. Good for Scouting.

 

Just to give a flavour of what's happening here in Scouting, tonight my Venturer Unit (14-17 year olds) will be abseiling. Tomorrow night the Cubs are having a sleepover with a neighbouring Cub Pack, and on Sunday the Scouts are going to the snow for a first time ski for most of them. Last weekend our Joey Scouts (6 and 7 year olds) won the Tui Shield (named after a New Zealand bird) for a 10 pin bowling competition between several local Joey Mobs. It's great to feel I'm contributing something towards getting kids doing all those activities. That's what we do this for, isn't it.

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