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PeteM

What Does Boy Run / Boy Led REALLY Mean?

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I agree with Acco40's statement, "The hardest thing for the adults to do is to allow the boys to fail"

 

The core of boy run is letting them make as many of the decisions as possible within the game that is called "Scouting". It's the Scoutmaster who runs this game, provides it's rules and stucture.

 

And I agree the the person who said,

 

"A boy is generally supremely confident in his own powers. Therefore, he dislikes being treated as a child and being told to do things or how to do them. He would much rather try for himself, even though it may lead him into blunders, but it is just by making mistakes that a boy gains experience and makes his character.

 

SCOUTING IS A GAME for boys, under the leadership of boys, in

which elder brothers can give their younger brothers healthy environment and encourage them to healthy activities such as will help them to develop CITIZENSHIP.

 

But to get first-class results from this system you have to give the boy leaders real free-handed responsibility-if you only give partial responsibility you will only get partial results.

 

The main object is not so much saving the Scoutmaster trouble as to give responsibility to the boy, since this is the very best of all means for developing character.

 

The Scoutmaster who hopes for success must not only study what is written about the Patrol System and its methods, but must put into practice the suggestions he reads. It is the doing of things that is so important, and only by constant trial can experience be gained by his Patrol Leaders and Scouts. The more he gives them to do, the more will they respond, the more strength and character will they achieve."

 

Each troop is run differently. Each Scoutmaster runs the game his own way. But the goal of the game should be the same for all - building character in a boy.

 

 

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So,

Are saying is that the Scouts run the troop, or is it the PLC runs the troop? There is a difference. I have a couple of Scouts that won't do the tasks that their Patrol leaders say to do IF they perceive that adults had a hand in the plan. How would you explain to the Troop that the PLC is the one that came up with the program/plan?

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One technique I've seen work: The visitor's gallery. Scouts not members of the PLC may attend, but they do not sit at the table and they do not have a voice.

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Avid SM..It was a pleasure reading your dissertation of how to run a Troop. I found that this type of writing is found in the National curriculum of training manuals, written by child psychologist. But, in reality ,... " is to try, to keep that boy in Scouting as long as possible." Boys who join , don't want or don't have the patience, to see how popular elected SPL is fumbling with the agenda. A boy does not join for CITIZENSHIP, or CHARACTER building....but to have fun , excitement ,adventure, games, fellowship, challenging activities, learn scout skills , and etc. Now, when you can present this to this boy on regular basis, now you will be able to mold his character and citizenship values. How much Scouting values are you going to implement to a boy, if he leaves scouting in four month ?,.... because so called boy run troop is boring, and the experienced adult leaders sit in the corner having coffee ? Read some of my other threads...jambo

 

 

 

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>>Boys who join , don't want or don't have the patience, to see how popular elected SPL is fumbling with the agenda. A boy does not join for CITIZENSHIP, or CHARACTER building....but to have fun , excitement ,adventure, games, fellowship, challenging activities, learn scout skills , and etc.

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Barry ! You are to idealistic in your approach. I don't think, that is not the way it is in the trenches, from my many years experience in running a Troop. And, you have the right to your opinion...and that is why this forum is great. " Keep it simple,make it fun "...jambo

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My vision was idealistic. My experiences "in the trenches" are real. I usually make it a habit to not pass along idealistic rantings. I am and engineer by trade and we tend toward proven logic.

 

Developing a true boy run program held within the limits of the Aims and Methods but with the goals of helping boys develop the skills to change themselves into men of character is not easy for adults. The idea that a scout can think for himself takes practice for both the scouts and the adults. Think about it, most adults simply don't trust kids. That takes practice.

 

I am the first to say that I failed a lot more then I succeeded. But I took those failures and developed the style scouting that tended toward a successful boy run program. I'm not the only one here who expresses idealistic approaches from successful experiences. All I ask is that everyone have and open mind so that they can try different approaches in their program.

 

By the way, in my passion to work with boys in scouting, I did a lot of reading and research that led me toward the type of program and experiences I pass along here. Just about all the resources I read came from the BSA and Baden Powell's writings. There is plenty of help to become better leaders for anyone who seeks it.

 

Barry

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EagleDad, it had never occurred to me to hand over the G2SS to our PLC and let THEM look up what they can and cannot do within the BSA guidelines. What a fantastic idea. It also keeps the adults from having to be the wet blankets and saying, sorry guys BSA rules say you can't do that.

 

Having our annual planning campout this weekend and I will have the G2SS at the ready for the Scouts.

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Yah, I don't think EagleDad is too idealistic. I've seen a number of troops "get it right" in the way he describes. Older boys love the responsibility of helpin' the younger lads, managing safety, growing into responsibilities. And it makes for a seamless transition into bein' ASMs eventually.

 

But in trying to get it on the green, there's too big sand traps scouters can fall into, eh?

 

One is not believin' it's possible to get there, and therefore not workin' on it. Lots of adults like this. Kids "aren't capable." "It's an adult job." "Have to enforce policy." etc. etc.

 

The second is tryin' to jump there in one step. Goin' "hands off", sink-or-swim rather than building up to boy-run progressively with training and guided practice. This leads to various versions of "boy run into the ground." And in chippin' out of this sand trap, most folks end up back in the first one, eh? Not "OK, we've got to do a better job of training/coaching" but "boys can't do this, we have to take over."

 

Beavah

 

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>> EagleDad, it had never occurred to me to hand over the G2SS to our PLC and let THEM look up what they can and cannot do within the BSA guidelines.

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Jambo wrote, "I found that this type of writing is found in the National curriculum of training manuals, written by child psychologist"

 

Way off the mark Jambo, it quoted from Baden Powell himself.

 

And, I disagree with your statement, "Who ever thought out this so called "Boy run" troop?. In my opinion, he should have his head examined.(or was this idea developed by the brains at our National Council?"

 

B-P was not some brain from National Council and neither am I. I'm just a Scoutmaster, "down in the trenches". My troop is boy run and it works very well. I've been doing this for almost 10 years.

 

Yes, boys join to have fun socialize with other boys. But, if you run the program right, they learn citizenship and develop character while they are at it.

 

Boy run really means boy run - plain and simple. Scouting is a game. It's mission is to develop character - period. A good scoutmaster knows this and does not ignore this mission for another, such as to be "the best troop in the USA".

 

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My dear fellow scouters. and AvidSM....I speak from many,many years of experience trying to run the " boy run program " and the adult leader guidance program, and I came to a conclusion that books, and training courses don't run an energetic unit. Some of you run a " do nothing " and a mediocre Troops "...that is OK ! BSA or is it ( baby sitting association )...likes that. They want 1000 small mediocre units, rather then 500 excellent run units. Remember , who wrote the training curriculum, have written for the purpose to benefit the national, and not the struggling " boy run units " around the country.Sorry, my wife is calling me, and she says that I am waisting my time..." no one is listening to you "...jambo

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jambo,

 

 

You keep throwing around the fact that you are sooooooooooo

experienced. You bash the current BSA program. Fine.

 

This forum has quite a few experienced leaders who run the current program and its working. There's flexibility everywhere, and you are only limited by your imagination and you Troop's membership. Sorry that you're "stuck" trashing the program.

 

You're right. I'm reading, but I'm not listening. Too much boy-led Scouting to do. That's where my time goes.

 

 

sst3rd

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EagleDad,

That is a GREAT idea, about giving a copy of the G2SS to the Senior Patrol and PLC.

 

Question though, Is the G2SS a "Guide" or is it some additional Rules and Regulations that National has given to us, or is it simply a clarification of the existing rules?

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Question though, Is the G2SS a "Guide" or is it some additional Rules and Regulations that National has given to us, or is it simply a clarification of the existing rules?

 

Yes. :)

 

It is primarily a guide, and the majority of the document is exactly that.

 

It is also a compilation of guidance and rules that appear in other places and documents, to make things easier for volunteers to find. That's why it has a "choppy" sort of feel, as it excerpts things from other documents. Those would not be "additional" rules, just rules, and they are never a clarification, just an excerpt.

 

B

 

 

 

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