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69RoadRunner

Philmont Gear Review

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I wouldn't mind camping with a hammock, but I drag along a CPAP with a deep cycle battery. (we don't go far from the trailer, so carrying isn't an issue.) Sort of tethers me to the ground via the hose. I prefer to put my Sansbug (netting pop-up shelter) on the ground or on a cot and if needed, string a tarp on a ridge line. If I know the weekend will have storms or if it is winter then I'll use a tent. 

Currently our troop only has one hammock-eteer (adult) and that's the only way he wants to camp. I admire him because he keeps his gear down to a single backpack. 

I had a hammock, but at last year's summer camp the rope attached to the tree broke while I was in it. Luckily 1) I was relaxed so the sudden drop to the ground didn't give me time to tense up 2) I had cleared any rocks/debris out from under the hammock 3) I had placed a camping pillow under my head. My fellow adult leaders didn't bother getting out of their respective chair/tent. Only offering their concerns before going back to sleep. LOL I was a little sore, but nothing bad. Didn't need to nap after that. 

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I'm kind of surprised to see so many folks embracing the idea of hammock camping.

That's great because there are a lot of situations where the size/weight advantage can let you go further or deeper into the wilderness, and there are a lot of situations where hammock camping can help us be "conservation minded" by putting less impact on the environment (hence, more LNT friendly).

But it's not always the case....

In many situations, hammock camping is actually a far BIGGER impact than tent camping.  It just depends...

So what does the experienced and responsible outdoorsman do? 

Well, the same thing he does for every other outdoor activity. He observes, applies knowledge and wisdom, and relies on the "authority of the resource" to guide him.

In some ecosystems, the trees simply aren't plentiful enough or big enough or strong enough to adequately support the stress of a hammock. In other cases, environmental conditions (like drought) might already have stressed the trees far beyond their ability to recover from the relatively short-term stress of a hammock or the relatively limited bark damage of a 1-night hammock stay. It just depends...

Scouters who love their hammocks but still want to be responsible outdoorsmen and who embrace the Outdoor Code can educate themselves about how the potential pitfalls of hammock use occur and can become aware of what natural factors affect the decision of whether or where to use a hammock.

Here's a good source of basic info that really helps understand just why hammocks can be a problem.
https://hammockinformation.com/do-hammocks-hurt-trees/

 

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On 8/29/2019 at 1:02 PM, mrkstvns said:

... In many situations, hammock camping is actually a far BIGGER impact than tent camping.  It just depends...

So what does the experienced and responsible outdoorsman do?...

Set up the hammock and tarp on the ground. This really isn't hard. And, it's a good way to keep track of your hiking poles.

The real take-home lesson from hammock-eters is that we need far less tent than we think. At least most of us.

@Buggie, gravity always wins. I take a long look at all of my rigging to try and guess when it will fail. When mine actually did (on my 50th birthday), a buddy was borrowing it! I slept through the "thud." So, point gravity. Until the next night, when rain swamped my tent, and it was actually drier ripping the top off and crawling underneath the floor-turned-lean-to. He slept comfortably through all of my cries for help. Anyhow, I suspect there would be a way to rig the CPAP. I often strap my pack to a tree, so I could imagine you doing something similar.

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While I do understand Philmont's reasons for not allowing hammocks, it would be a way to not have to sleep right next to a stinky tentmate.  😴

If you had a crew of 12 all in hammocks, there are some Philmont campsites where you'd struggle to find 12 hammock spots.

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23 hours ago, qwazse said:

Anyhow, I suspect there would be a way to rig the CPAP. I often strap my pack to a tree, so I could imagine you doing something similar.

Good idea. I normally keep it elevated off the ground and on my tote which I spray with some bug spray as a barrier, but my big concern deals with small critters crawling their way inside of he unit through some crack. The provisions I take are my best response so far. In a tent, far less issues with wandering bugs. 

And the old saying, "Gravity never lets me down." *thud*

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On 8/29/2019 at 12:02 PM, mrkstvns said:

I'm kind of surprised to see so many folks embracing the idea of hammock camping.

That's great because there are a lot of situations where the size/weight advantage can let you go further or deeper into the wilderness, and there are a lot of situations where hammock camping can help us be "conservation minded" by putting less impact on the environment (hence, more LNT friendly).

But it's not always the case....

In many situations, hammock camping is actually a far BIGGER impact than tent camping.  It just depends...

Like everything else, doing something right and having a great experience is all about training. Whether the scout learns how to use the tree saw (causes most injuries) properly or the hammock, training dictates proper use.

I'm not a fan of sleeping in hammocks. I have a backpacking hammock I take on every trip, but it is more for relaxing. I found that I can't sleep in taco position. But, that is just me. I want scouts to experience as much as they can in their scouting experience, so I would encourage scouts to learn about hammocks and how to properly use them. Then see how it goes. I wouldn't expect a whole patrol to use them because we allow single man tents and only 3 or 4 scouts in the whole troop use them. But, if more scouts than trees want to experience hammocks, then we scouters get to watch their character skills.😎

Barry

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7 minutes ago, Eagledad said:

because we allow single man tents

Interesting.  Is that for Youth Protection?

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1 minute ago, SteveMM said:

Interesting.  Is that for Youth Protection?

No, we are a backpacking troop. Some scouts go all out in the minimal backpacking experience and purchase their own tent. Ironically they don't always take them on Crew backwoods treks and instead tent with other scouts to reduce campsite foot print impact. 

Barry

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8 minutes ago, Eagledad said:

No, we are a backpacking troop. Some scouts go all out in the minimal backpacking experience and purchase their own tent. Ironically they don't always take them on Crew backwoods treks and instead tent with other scouts to reduce campsite foot print impact. 

Barry

Ahhh ... I see.  That makes sense, then.  I know one of the things my son learned from his Philmont experience this summer was splitting one tent between two hikers is lighter than each carrying a one man tent.  And, as you said, it reduces impact to the campsite.

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1 hour ago, SteveMM said:

Ahhh ... I see.  That makes sense, then.  I know one of the things my son learned from his Philmont experience this summer was splitting one tent between two hikers is lighter than each carrying a one man tent.  And, as you said, it reduces impact to the campsite.

Yes, that is probably more our motivation than footprint impact also. by the end of they, the ounces hurt more than the pounds.

Barry

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3 hours ago, SteveMM said:

Ahhh ... I see.  That makes sense, then.  I know one of the things my son learned from his Philmont experience this summer was splitting one tent between two hikers is lighter than each carrying a one man tent.  And, as you said, it reduces impact to the campsite.

Depends on the tent.  My son's Duomid weighs 35 ounces, which is less than half a Philtent and sleeps 2.  He left the inner attached, so he carried the whole thing and his tentmate carried more of their food to make it even.

There are many 1 person tents that weigh even less.

https://www.tarptent.com/product/protrail/#tab-id-2

https://www.sixmoondesigns.com/collections/tents/products/lunar-solo

 

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20 minutes ago, 69RoadRunner said:

Depends on the tent.  My son's Duomid weighs 35 ounces, which is less than half a Philtent and sleeps 2.  He left the inner attached, so he carried the whole thing and his tentmate carried more of their food to make it even.

There are many 1 person tents that weigh even less.

https://www.tarptent.com/product/protrail/#tab-id-2

https://www.sixmoondesigns.com/collections/tents/products/lunar-solo

 

You're right.  I'm actually remembering now that my son THOUGHT they'd split the tent parts up, but they actually did what you said -- one would carry the tent while the other carried the food.  

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On 8/28/2019 at 10:18 AM, Eagledad said:

I'm curious of how many scouts use hammocks. Most of the hammock users in our troop were adults. Scouts tried them out for an hour, but never got motivated to use them. 

Barry

Its increased quite a bit in our area so much so that our ranger (for our woodbadge conservation project) made a hammock garden at an existing campsite. 

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On 8/29/2019 at 12:02 PM, mrkstvns said:

I'm kind of surprised to see so many folks embracing the idea of hammock camping.

 

I wouldn't say I "embrace" it....I prefer tenting.  Most of my hanging nights are solely based on the conditions.   

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On 9/4/2019 at 2:23 PM, 69RoadRunner said:

It blows me away how we always play MORE for less lol.  I wanted a one man but wasn't going to pay $200.00 + for one.  

I purchased the Alps Mystic 1.5 (not the outfitter) Weight 3 lbs, 14 oz  with floor saver and it has served me well for 5+ years.  Got it from HikersDirect for about $120.00

 

 

I have also abandoned the idea of taking my own tent.

I am buying the Osprey 60 Aether, waiting for a sale fist.  Bag will be a Kelty Galactic 30 w lightweight liner 

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