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Liz

Firewood Gathering Poem?

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While selling Camp Cards at the grocery store today, a mature gentleman stopped to buy a card and tell my daughter a little about his time in Scouting which I’d estimate to have been in the 50’s or so. He said he remembered all the old camp songs and poems and partially recited one about gathering wood. It started off as a list of different types of wood like Beech, Ash, etc. I wish I would have thought to ask if I could record him reciting the whole thing but alas, that idea didn’t come to me. I had never heard the poem before. Anybody know what it might have been?

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Posted (edited)

Perhaps the Firewood Poem (British) or a variation - Woodsman Poem...

Edited by RememberSchiff

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Posted (edited)

The Firewood Poem

Beechwood fires are bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year,
Chestnut's only good they say,
If for logs 'tis laid away.
Make a fire of Elder tree,
Death within your house will be;
But ash new or ash old,
Is fit for a queen with crown of gold

Birch and fir logs burn too fast
Blaze up bright and do not last,
it is by the Irish said
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread.
Elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
E'en the very flames are cold
But ash green or ash brown
Is fit for a queen with golden crown

Poplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke,
Apple wood will scent your room
Pear wood smells like flowers in bloom
Oaken logs, if dry and old
keep away the winter's cold
But ash wet or ash dry
a king shall warm his slippers by.
 
The firewood poem was written by Celia Congreve, is believed to be first published in THE TIMES newspaper on March 2nd 1930. 
Edited by RememberSchiff

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That’s a great poem!!

Sadly, it’s not the same one this gentleman was reciting. It began with just a long catalog of woods like “Birch, Maple, Fir and Ash,” (just random woods I don’t recall which ones there were) and something about how all of them were good for making campfires. 

We’ll be selling at the same location in a couple of weeks. With some luck maybe he’ll stop by again. 

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Posted (edited)

Woodsman advice has often been taught by verse and song.  ...Leaves of three, let them be.  Berries white, take flight.  ... Right over left,  left over  right.... Over under, under over.

Another possible poem,  Fire  Woods

These hardwoods burn well and slowly,
Ashbeechhawthorn, oak and holly.

Softwoods flare up quick and fine,
Birchfirhazellarch and pine.

Elm and willow you’ll regret,
Chestnut green and sycamore wet.   

And who can argue the  truth of this verse.

No matter which hardwood or softwood you burn,
OakAppleRowan or Plane
You will find that when to your grate you return
There is one which will always remain …Ash!

Edited by RememberSchiff

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56 minutes ago, RememberSchiff said:

Woodsman advice has often been taught by verse and song.  ...Leaves of three, let them be.  Berries white, take flight.  ... Right over left,  left over  right.... Over under, under over.

Another possible poem,  Fire  Woods

These hardwoods burn well and slowly,
Ashbeechhawthorn, oak and holly.

Softwoods flare up quick and fine,
Birchfirhazellarch and pine.

Elm and willow you’ll regret,
Chestnut green and sycamore wet.   

And who can argue the  truth of this verse.

No matter which hardwood or softwood you burn,
OakAppleRowan or Plane
You will find that when to your grate you return
There is one which will always remain …Ash!

That might have been it! 

Very cool! :) 

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Or this:   

From   "The Sacrament of Fire"

by John Oxenham (1852-1941)

 

Kneel always when you light a fire!
Kneel reverently,  and thankful  be
For God’s unfailing charity;
And on ascending flame inspire
A little prayer,   which shall  upbear
The incense of your thankfulness
For this sweet   grace of warmth and light;
For here again is sacrifice
For your delight.

Oak, Elm, and Chestnut, Beech and Red Pine Bole ; --
God  shrined  HIS  sunshine  and enwombed
For you these stores of light and heat,
Your Life- Joys complete.
These all have died that you might live:
Yours now the high prerogative
To loose their long captivities,
And through these  new  activities
A wider life to give.

Kneel always when you light a fire!
Kneel  reverently,
And grateful be
For God’s unfailing charity.

  • Upvote 1

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