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Ohanadad

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About Ohanadad

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  1. Ohanadad

    Boys Life

    We don't use it in our pack activities, but my son enjoys reading it and doing the puzzles. As a Webelo, he's looking forward to doing the "cool" Boy Scout activities that he reads about. He has his heart set on one day going to the Sea Base in Florida.
  2. Ohanadad

    Old uniform memory lane

    Along with the uniform stuff, I found all my MB books. We're talking the ones featuring B&W pictures of scouts from the '50-60. Not sure what to do with them since the requirements have changes for the MBs. They still have good knowledge in them, but I just don't know if I have the space to keep them. Any ideas?
  3. Ohanadad

    Proud to be a Scout and a Scouter

    Amen Brothers, Amen
  4. Ohanadad

    First Camping Trip

    Need to be careful about activities you allow the Tigers to do. Check out the Age Appropriate Guidelines: http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/34416_Insert_Web.pdf Some will say these guidelines are wet blankets for the kids, but they're there to protect kids and the leaders. I have a friend who's a lawyer and he lives for lawsuits that involve people that go against written policy (they know/find out they can't defend against a lawsuit and settle quickly. As he says, it's easy money)(This message has been edited by Ohanadad)
  5. Seattle, WB still does what you described (patrol method), but it doesn't and wasn't designed to go into the specific problems that MattR was looking for. I agree with you that it does take experience, judgement, and coaching, but the question is how to get the new SMs those things other than letting them learn it the hard way.
  6. Ohanadad

    STEM/Nova

    Our district had a Cuboree that focused on STEM and did activities that completed some of the requirements for the first module. The kids enjoyed it (except the presenter that discussed the scientific method to 1st-4th graders, "So from my data, I can conclude that my hypothesis was essentially incorrect." Thankfully the next event was on levers that the kids got to try out and do things. Since we started working on the NOVA award, my son and I watched a PBS Nova TV episode "Making Stuff: Stronger" to work on the next module. Since he's in his military interest phase, this was perfect since the show starts out on an aircraft carrier and talks about the material properties of arresting gear cable. Fast forward to the end of the show and I ask him, "So what are two questions that you thought of about the show?" I'm thinking he's going to ask about carrier ops that have nothing to do with the show, but instead he asks, "Why is everything made out of atoms?" Took me awhile to pick my jaw off the ground. (This message has been edited by Ohanadad)
  7. Ohanadad

    President Buys Popcorn from Tiger Cub

    Dang, someone beat my son to the President. He had the $75 tin all ready for him to buy.(This message has been edited by Ohanadad)
  8. Ohanadad

    Sharks and Minnows saves the day

    We had our pack meeting this weekend which each den's parents would run an activity station. While planning, we figured out that we needed to increase the time for the pack meeting so all the boys and siblings go cycle through the stations. We decided to hold off awards, den presentations, etc. and go straight into the activity stations after a quick opening ceremony. Well, Murphy struck. Since the parents organized the stations, most of the stations weren't set up in time for the start of the pack meeting and of course I didn't plan on anything since we had so many activities already lined up for the boys to do. In order to buy the parents some time, I launched into a Halloween version of "Sharks and Minnows" which became "Zombies and Villagers." If you don't know how it's played, all the kids line up on one side of the playing field and try to run to the safe zone on the on the side of the field. One player (me) is in the middle of the field and has to tag the kids as they run across the field. Anyone I tag turns into a Zombie and helps me out as the kids race back the other side. Before long, there is only one fast kid with a bunch of zombies chasing after him/her. Anyway, having this game in the hip pocket was able to occupy the whole pack until the stations were ready (which was good because it was getting really hard for me to tag those kids as time went on). The other good thing about this game, is that you can change the name to fit pretty much any situation (ice monsters vs. reindeer, Pilgrims vs. Turkeys, etc.) and doesn't need any equipment or preparation. What's your "go to" on the fly activity?
  9. The problem is that WB21 was not designed to go into a certain program specifics, but give a scout leader, regardless of what program they were in, leadership/management skills. Even though WB21 uses the patrol method and focuses a lot on being a troop, it wasn't suppose to teach the participates how to be a SM. If you focus on teach the things that MattR was looking for, you need to tack on another weekend. As is WB is packed enough and we were calling for a review of WB content since new stuff gets added in, but nothing gets taken out. That means the staff is pressed to teach more content in the same amount of time. While a lot of people say there is some downtime, it's purposely put in there for the participants to work on tickets, interact with others, and allow them time to think about what they're learning. You can't have them dring from the firehose all the time. More and more, I'm starting to think University of Scouting (if done right) is the right venue for this "extended training for SMs." As an incentive, the requirements for Unit Leader Award of Merit, should be changed so leaders need to complete certain required courses at UoS that deal specifically with being a better SM, CM, etc. For those out there that say they've been a SM forever and don't need UoS classes, going there and participating could be the key link to start a mentorship with new SMs. Again, a lot of this hinges on if national/councils can make this happen and I just don't see this rising to anyone's priority lists.
  10. One of our packs narrowly escaped closing down due to lack of adult leaders. Now we're in process of training a new group of leaders that grudgingly volunteered. One thing I noticed that of the new leaders, not one had scouting experience as a youth. This got me thinking on what "today's" scout leaders are like demographically. Does anyone know if BSA publishes these stats? I know the military services keep close eyes on demographics of the force, leadership, etc. and adjust recruiting, training, etc. based on those statistics. Here's what I would be interested in: NOTE: I make a lot of generalizations and assumptions that may or may not be correct, but it's meant to be thought provoking. - Average age of registered leaders as a whole and program level (CS, BS, Ven, District, council, national, etc). Is leadership getting older/younger. As we change generations, we may see changes of outdoor experience/skills, technology usage, etc. For example, older leaders may be used to more outdoor activities than younger leaders who may not have had a lot of outdoor experience (i.e. need more outdoor skills/exposure for initial leader training and program helps). Likewise the next generation may be more risk taking (extreme sports/thrill seeking) than the previous (e.g. taking Tiger Cubs white water rafting. May mean greater emphasis on Age Appropriate Guidelines) - Average years of registered adult service in BSA (by whole and program level). Is the average getting longer/shorter. We do a lot on recruiting, but what about retention. Isn't having scouters with experience better for programs? Could drive more emphasis on recruiting or retention. - Percentage with scouting experience as a youth. Again if a majority of leaders come in without scouting experience, more initial training may be needed since the leaders don't have their childhood memories to fall back on. - Percentage male vs. female (by whole and program level). It seems we have a lot of women in CS, but there's a dramatic drop off at cross over. Is that a good thing or not? We see the SM as the sage, worldly, leader that knew how to handle everything in the outdoors (think "The Scoutmaster" painting), but has that changed? (This message has been edited by Ohanadad)
  11. I would love to go through the course that this thread is putting together. It would be specialized training for experienced SMs that deal with what advance topics that SMs want and need. Bringing Subject Matter Experts (and not just the friends of the guy who had to put the training course together) to teach. And follow up mentorship by experienced, knowledgeable, and qualified senior SMs. The question is can BSA put a program like that together? Everything I've seen from BSA has been centered around taking the parent that has no experience in scouting and getting them to a level of confidence to be a scout leader. What MattR is looking for (and I do too) goes well beyond anything I've seen from BSA in recent years. Yes, RT is a key, but only if the RT Commissioner knows that what the audience wants and he/she can deliver those lessons (maybe invite the SMEs to speak at RT?). Isn't there a thread on how RT is putting out bad info? Need to really get the RT commissioners to work it. UoS also a plays a part, but again only if the instructor can deliver the lessons. Is BSA going to standardize the lessons. And also, if I had a choice between "Development of Boy Scouts by Age" or "Fun with Dutch Oven Cooking" hmmm which course to take. Some sort of recommended course track that SMs should follow and not just have them pick what sounds fun. I like the commissioner being more hands on to mentor unit leaders, but only if the commissioner are qualified. How do you judge that? Like I said, it would be great to have. I just wish there was a way to get it to National Training Staff to chew on.
  12. Ohanadad

    Ugly Beading Ceremony

    BD. What is your issue that you feel you have to directly attack me? I try very hard to keep my comments in general (even when responding to other people's replies). I try to focus on my actions/feelings/behaviors and not bash others (if I did, I'm sorry to that person). My comment was on WB requirements not scouting in general. I wish I only spent a few hundred dollars and six days on scouting in total. You spent thousands of dollars...great. Hundreds of nights camping...good for you. Give your entire paycheck to needy scouts...yes you're definitely in line for BSA sainthood. Making snide comments to me and any person who has a positive thing to say about WB, BSA leader awards, and anything that goes against your view of what scouting is suppose to be about...you're acting like bully which we warn our boys about (I had more colorful words, but this a scouting forum). I hate to say this, but as much as you hate WB and it's "elitism", you're behaving like those, "good ole boys" who been around forever and hates anything different from what scouting was like when they were a boy. "In my day...." Yeah, I may not have the years of scouting that you have but I like to think that I'm still a scout leader and can contribute in my small way to scouting. Yes, I'm involved in Cub Scouting. I'm not going to be belittled by it. How many of your scouts have their AoL? How many of them skipped CS and joined Boy Scouts from the start? The trend is most cross over from CS and very few join Boy Scouts directly. Without CS packs, troops start to fold. I'm lucky, the troop that we feed into has a great SM which is encouraging and understands that along with the scouts, the adults also cross over to the troop and become future CCs, ASMs, SMs. Do you talk down to the CS leaders at your feeder packs like they don't know anything? You got your thoughts and opinions, I got mine. Let's state it and not get into a furball going after each other. No one likes flame wars on a forum. "A Scout is kind"(This message has been edited by Ohanadad)(This message has been edited by Ohanadad)
  13. Ohanadad

    Ugly Beading Ceremony

    I think the bottom line of this thread is that the WB staff who is doing the beading ceremony needs to talk to the person being beaded (what is his/her expectations), judge the audience, and tailor the presentation to the audience. This is the feedback that needs to go to Course Directors and put into the staff materials. I think that people tend to over do the beading ceremonies because they want to convey how much the person who is getting beaded had to do. Think about it, you pay hundreds of dollars, sacrifice six days away from your family, do the tickets which can sometimes take over a year. It's a lot and not everyone does it. For a staff members, if this is one of the first from the patrol/course that is getting beaded, you to are exremely proud of the person getting beaded. Unfortunately, they forget their audience and can go on and on. It's would be like if you did a Eagle CoH at a Pack meeting. While the cubs would understand it's a special occation, they would be bored out of their minds within 10 minutes.
  14. Ohanadad

    Another WB Benefit

    Good input 2cub. Here's the funny thing, most of the WB folks were there running the activity stations. The most I got was really short conversations in between sessions. Still, it was good to see friends again vs. being lost in the mob. The same benefit goes for RT. At the Cuboree I ran into many of the pack leaders that attend RT. Of course we had even shorter coversation as we were chasing after the cubs.
  15. In other posts I go on about WB did for me, but the one thing that I missed was that WB expanded my scouting contacts. Prior to WB, I was active in my pack, went to RT, Cuborees, etc., but I mainly stayed in my group from my pack. At WB, I met a great group of friends in my patrol. When I went through as a staff member, that group expanded tremendously. At the last Cuboree, it was like a reunion of Wood Badgers. Was it that Wood Badgers are attracted to Cuborees? No, the difference is that I got to know different scouter from outside of my pack during the WB course. As such, both me and my son (who got to know/play with other kids) enjoy district/council functions more than ever. Not a huge benefit but one that means something to me.
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