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Arrowhead

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Posts posted by Arrowhead


  1. I was looking over the National Outdoor Challenge application to see if our troop could earn this award.

     

    Requirement #5. The troop earned at least one outdoors-related merit badge per Scout.

     

    Is this an average, or does each individual have to earn at least one of the designated merit badges? "The troop" suggests to me that it is an average, so if some of our guys earn several MBs from "the list" it will compensate for those who earn none. This would also help in the instance when you have guys in your troop who've already earned all the MBs on "the list".

     

    "The list" of qualifying Merit Badges: Backpacking, Camping, Canoeing, Climbing, Cooking, Cycling, Emergency Preparedness, Environmental Science, First Aid, Fish and Wildlife Management, Fishing, Fly-fishing, Forestry, Hiking, Lifesaving, Orienteering, Pioneering, Rowing, Scuba, Snow Sports, Soil and Water Conservation, Swimming, Water Sports, and Whitewater.

     

    Why not - Archery, Astronomy, Athletics, Bird Study, Gardening, Golf, Horsemanship, Insect Study, Mammal Study, Motorboating, Nature, Oceanography, Personal Fitness, Reptile and Amphibian Study, Rifle Shooting, Shotgun Shooting, Small Boat Sailing, Sports, Surveying, Wilderness Survival?

     

    The application I have is from 2010, so maybe national would, or wouldn't, have listed Geocaching and Kayaking.

     

    Anyone out there ever just decided they'd use these other obvious choices and say "done" with it?


  2. I can empathize. I was inducted as a youth and finally became a Brotherhood member as an adult after a long absence from Scouting. Like you, I had memorized everything on the several Brotherhood questionnaires that I found and printed a thoughtful and sincere letter to the Lodge Chief. My Brotherhood class was a disappointment. It seemed that I was the only candidate who knew the material, and I actually dictated the song to the Lodge Chief to so he could write it on a white board for the class. On a positive note, the Brotherhood hike and ceremony were done very well.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77


  3. Hey, man, I feel your pain; I've been there, too. You want so badly for those youngsters to understand what a golden opportunity Scouting is, and for them to take full advantage of it.

     

    I concur with dg98adams: keep in touch with that young man.

     

    And I might add, pray for him.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77


  4. I've used a Therm-a-rest RidgeRest and one of their first inflatables for decades - alternating, not together. I just purchased one of their NeoAir inflatables several months ago and it's a dream come true: wonderfully comfortable and compact. I'm better than 50yrs old and lean, with very little natural padding on my hips, so, it has been well worth the price.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77


  5. Is anyone knowledgeable about the status of this LNT Master Educator cloth strip? I cant seem to find information on whether or not it is official, or proper placement on the uniform. I guess it would be placed where the interpreter strip is supposed to reside. Im keen to have this on my uniform, but am presently riding the fence since I tend to follow the rules and cant confirm that this item is sanctioned by the B.S.A.

     

    (http://www.boyscoutstore.com/leave-no-trace-master-educator-strip-red.html)

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle 77

     


  6. Porsche 914-4 (used) - wish it could have been a 914-6, or even a 916!

    Then a 924 (used), then a 924turbo (used).

    Then I became somewhat more sensible.

    If I play the lottery, and win big, it will be an 1958 Corvette, or an Aston Martin, or a Ford GT40.

     

    Remember, Porsche is a two syllable word!

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77


  7. LNT - overrated! I think not.

    Leave No Trace: A Guide to the New Wilderness Etiquette, 2nd ed., by Annette McGivney, is the best source I've found to flesh out the topic. I appreciate, and find it easier to remember something when I know more about a topic - in this case, the principles and recommendations of LNT.

    So you can go backpacking, remember to take at least the essentials, spend a reasonably comfortable night, and make it back (without blisters). Great! I'm somewhat impressed. Now do it as a practitioner of LNT (with a good attitude) - that shows some finesse!

     

    Best regards,

    and happy trails!

    Eagle '77

     


  8. Were only days away from a new calendar year.

     

    So, what, if any, resolution will you hold yourself to in the coming year?

     

    Being Scouts and Scouters, surely the pantheon of virtues stated in the Scout Oath and Scout Law will be mentioned often.

     

    For those elected into the Order of the Arrow, will you remind yourselves to be unselfish in service and devotion to the welfare of others?

     

    Will you be more vigilant in your efforts to Leave No Trace when visiting the great outdoors?

     

    Will you continue, or perhaps join, the health initiative and eat healthy and exercise (more)?

     

    For me, its all of the above. And be more patient with others.

     

    The very best to you all in the coming year,

    Eagle 77

     


  9. I wish to extend a great heapin helpin of appreciation to those who responded with positive comments. Special thanks to Eagledad, AvidSM, BDPtoo, MMallin, jblake47, and, of course, da Bevah.

     

    After further researching, I tend to concur that the three module outlines in the Scoutmaster Handbook are not much more than, well , outlines talking points, if you will. Even after referring back to the suggested references, it appears that an engaging presentation will take quite a bit of effort on my part. Spirited dialogue, not monolog, seems to be in order. I will probably use the Power Point presentation, too, for its utility, not out of spite.

     

    I intend on conveying most, if not all, of your opinions on this matter to our Scoutmaster.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle 77

     


  10. I've segued from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts with my son. I'm privileged to now be an Assistant Scoutmaster, and I've been challenged to help reorganize our troop, starting with Troop Leadership Training (TLT). Our troop has two patrols with approximately a dozen to sixteen boys attending meetings.

    I've read the section on TLT in the Scoutmaster Handbook (Chp.7

    Training Youth Leaders) and appreciated the recommendation to hold TLT after each change in youth leadership (approximately every six months).

    I have several questions.

    (1) Do we invite the entirety of the youth members to attend the three training sessions, or just those who have been elected into, or assigned, positions of responsibility (POR)?

    (2) Assuming this training will review the responsibilities of each POR in our troop, will the boys who attend be eligible to wear the "Trained" patch for each subsequent POR they hold for their entire career in our troop? Or, must a boy attend another TLT when he assumes a new POR?

    (3) Do we tailor subsequent TLT sessions to address only the areas that we, the adult leaders, see as needing improvement? We would hand out new Position Description cards at these subsequent TLT sessions and review responsibilities.

     

    Thank you for your kind attention to this matter.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77

     


  11. I'm presently working on a monolog for an Arrow of Light presentation. Most of the ceremonies I've found in my research ascribe seven virtues of a good life to the seven sun rays on the Arrow of Light badge. I'd like to known how, when, and why this tradition came about.

     

    These virtues are:

    The Cardinal virtues - prudence (wisdom), justice, temperance (self-control), fortitude (courage)

    The Transcendent virtues - faith, hope, love (charity)

     

    Webelos Handbook, p.62 - "The Arrow of Light award displays a universal symbol for the sun and below it, an arrow. The 7 rays of the sun stand for each day of the week. They remind you to do your best every day as you follow the arrow that leads to Boy Scouting."

     

    Thank you, in advance, for your insight.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle '77

     


  12. I purchased a Bear Warrior-2 (compound) for my son, a bit over a year ago. It has a really nice draw cycle, but, the arrow rest is the weakest element - it's a flimsy piece of rubber - very frustrating to kids, and adults, alike - it's not, in the least, easily replaced with a practical rest. One, if not the best, beginner compound bows is, as Basementdweller noted, the Genesis. Anything else is temporary junk. Just like telescopes - buy the best, or don't buy at all. I graduated my son to a Diamond Razor's Edge ($$) after twelve months. All the "kiddie" junk is just biding time, throwing money down the latrine.

    (My CV relevant to this: Range officer for multiple Cub Scout shooting events. I shoot a Bowtech 101st Airborne)

     

    PS: I love the USS NC - wish I coulda' been there again with you guys this summer.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle 1977


  13. I need suggestions on how to approach Scouts and their parents about insignia placement. My "knee jerk" reaction is usually "If you cared about this, you would find out before you did it." Fortunately, I haven't actually said that to anyone.

    Last fall I put together a small folder with "essential" information about the Cub Scout program and our pack to give to each Scout. I included a uniform inspection form, and noted that insignia placement is in each handbook. There may have been some improvement over the year before.

    Maybe next year I'll include one page with bold 36pt font stating "Ask me before you attach anything to your uniform!"

     

    Have you ever seen National Geographic's "Arlington: Field of Honor"? The scenes about uniform preparation and inspection bring tears to my eyes.

     

    Am I too serious, or am I just proud to wear my uniform properly?

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle 1977


  14. I was there February a year ago. I slept out on the screened-in porch the first night because I couldn't handle the snoring - would've been a bit more comfortable if I'd yanked a matress out there instead of sleeping on the floor.

    Spartan conditions? That was the mascot where I graduated from high school! I thought the facility was great.

    The turning point in my Cubmaster career was near the end of the weekend when John Morton stood up on a chair and did his rendering of the peanut butter (budder?) song. Even if you have to pay him, it'd be worth it!

    I drove in at 0700 on Friday morning. The graduation ceremony was around noon on Sunday.

    All you need to know is in the e-mail you should've received much earlier this week.

     

    The very best regards,

    Eagle 1977 (Uwharrie Council, Lodge 208)


  15. Apparently we may embellish beyond our current occupation, so Ill follow suit, in chronological progression.

    Domestic custodian (i.e., took out the trash, washed the dishes, and mowed at home)

    B.S.A. summer camp staff

    School bus driver (high school)

    Life guard (high school and college - Lifeguard B.S.A., Water Safety Instructor)

    Clinical staff pharmacist

    Then, of course, the interests and hobbies would trail on ad nauseum, to included Cubmaster.


  16. When I received my copy of Scouting and had glanced through and seen the picture of those three obviously overweight men, the incongruity with the aim to tame this countrys obesity epidemic didnt escape me.

     

    I attended a cardiology update a while back and the presentation of the trend of obesity in our nation is indelibly stamped in my mind. If youve never seen this obesity trend map, I highly encourage a visit (http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html).

     

    Early this year I attended a weekend of National Camping School for Cub Scout Day Camp positions. It seemed that close to the majority of the staff and students were overweight; more than a few were morbidly obese. And all throughout the weekend, what did they do but eat. With as much junk that was eaten during the training sessions it shocked me that they had any appetite at all when it came time for meals! I suppose a few silly songs burn more kilocalories than I had imagined. (To their credit, though, they certainly appeared to be devoted to a good cause. Being Scouters, not eating.)

     

    Being a hospital pharmacist, I think I could come pretty close to disclosing the medication cocktails our Key 3 are probably taking. Would you think hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are a foregone conclusion? The marks of a CPAP mask werent obvious to me, but I be willing to bet obstructive sleep apnea is also there in diagnosis. And how about those knees? Reckon theyve been replaced?

     

    Its no secrete that staying fit is usually a challenge. My incentives are the desire to not spend my income on licit (or illicit) drugs and to stay in shape for the days ahead when my son will be able to go on some substantial adventures. Perhaps Ill climb Aconcagua, again!


  17. My son just earned his second in the series. I showed him the change in emblem design and asked which he liked best. He chose the old "classic" God and Family. So I wrote at the top of the application, and highlighted it, that he'd prefer that over the new design, if they happened to still have them in stock. They obliged, and he and I are happy about it.


  18. Woe is me! I must be plagued with a double dose of ego. I wear my Eagle knot and have a specialized North Carolina license plate with an Eagle medal on it. And all along I had thought the plate was advertisement for the B.S.A. and incentive for me to keep my driving habits under control!


  19. Last summer I read the National Summertime Den award requirements into the National Summertime Pack award. I was desperate to round up at least fifty-percent of my pack to attend the events I scheduled during each of the summer months. Happily, I breathed a sigh of relief when we barely made the quota during August. Only later did I discover my misinterpretation of the requirements.

     

    Definately schedule more than one event during each of the three months to provide the guys ample opportunity to earn the award. I'm not one for bending the rules, but if there was a Scout who made it to several events during two months, and just couldn't attend during one, I'd be hard pressed not to grant him the award. That's also assuming he was enthusiastic about the award, not just his parent's desire for another feather in his cap.

     

    Best regards,

    Eagle 1977

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