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Neckerchiefs and collars

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  • #16
    When our Pack went to the U.S.S. Hornet a couple of weeks ago, our leaders always wear neckers with our uniforms. We were the odd Pack out. The other leaders all did not wear neckers and it was a shame. I have always liked the way they looked. I remember looking at my brother's scout book and seeing the different ways a necker could be used. In fact, I am starting to become quite the woggle collector now and I am trying to whittle a paw woggle. We will see if it turns out, lol.

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    • #17
      My district Commissioner told me a neck item is required for my position

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      • ScoutNut
        ScoutNut commented
        Editing a comment
        Which neck item?

        My District Commissioner has never required me, as a Unit Commissioner, to wear any kind of neck item.

    • #18
      Bolo or neckerchief... he said those were required items

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      • #19
        Interesting. It must be required by your District, or council, it is not required by BSA National.

        So - which do you plan on wearing? Commissioner necker, or Boy Scout bolo?

        Personally, I am not a big bolo fan. I like personalized woggles/slides, so, if pressed, and although I think the red neckers are a bit small, I would opt for the necker.
        Last edited by ScoutNut; 02-03-2014, 10:21 AM.

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        • #20
          Commissioner necker

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          • #21
            I wear the old green BSA tie for formal occasions. This "neck item" is formal. Otherwise I wear a square necker over the collar for field occasions.

            Stosh

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            • #22
              Hi all

              Fun discussion. I'm a little surprised that someone hasn't posted that the uniform isn't required or needed for the aims.

              Like stosh, I come from the era of always wearing the necker because of many uses. In fact, I don't have the most recent Scout Handbook nearby, can someone tell me if the Handbook requires the necker for full uniform, and is it demonstrated in the first-aid skills section?

              One thing different about the neckers today from the one I wore as a youth (still have it) they are much smaller today. I bought the necker that comes from Gilwell for WB and it is closer to the size of my youth necker.

              As a youth, I didn't worry about the collar, I had the shirt that didn't have a collar. It is much more comfortable on hot Oklahoma summer days. I don't think the BSA used them long.

              Barry

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              • #23
                I keep a Trauma Kit for Medical Emergencies (instead of using my necker lol)

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                • jblake47
                  jblake47 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  As a formerly certified national EMT, I wear my trauma kit. It's a lot lighter than carrying one.

                  Stosh

              • #24
                The look and style of the neckerchief is an individual unit decision.

                According to the BSA's Guide to Awards and Insignia(see page 12), the option to wear the neckerchief over or under the collar (or even to wear a neckerchief at all) is up to individual units to vote on. Boy Scout neckerchiefs are optional and troops choose their own official neckerchief colors and style. Additionally, according to the guide: "official neckerchiefs are triangular in shape" and "the neckerchief is worn only with the official uniform and never with T-shirts or civilian clothing."

                A good neckerchief is a great way for building unit identity, unity and pride. As Baden-Powell said, "every Troop has its own scarf color, and since the honor of your Troop is bound up in the scarf, you must be very careful to keep it clean and tidy." A neat and sharp-looking neckerchief is a great way to look sharp and show Scout spirit as a unit.

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                • jblake47
                  jblake47 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Nice picture, but that style of necker is no longer available for purchase.

                  Stosh

              • #25
                Ahhh... a thread after my own heart. I make the neckers for our Troop to pretty traditional specs and I'm firmly in the tuck-the-collar-inside-and-wear-the-necker-on-the-outside camp. However I freely admit to being in a minority of one in our BSA Troop. Having said that they probably think it's simply British eccentricity at play, along with the occasional pith helmet appearance and campaign hat with the dimples turned 45 degrees. I admit I have also contemplated taking a pair of scissors to one of my shirt collars as someone mentioned earlier ("Elvis" - haha yes!)...

                Funnily enough, for all the talk of boys not wanting to wear neckers, we've just started a new Venture Crew and the lads have unanimously voted to wear a necker, despite the current lack of uniform requirements. That really does give me hope for our youth.

                Coracle



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                • #26
                  Yep, national is getting out the necker business, and my son's SM freaked out after hearing about it. Apparently the PLC had just switched necker styles from their original pattern from way back when, to one of the few styles that remain. Now they are thinking about going custom.

                  As for neckers being used for first aid. 1 story and 1 bit of advice

                  When I was teaching First Aid MB to a troop, I was using some on my neckers as bandages. I started talking about how BP made neckers a part of the uniform because of their many uses, including first aid. Later on, The SM tell me a story about how the patrols in the troop were penalized by the camporee inspectors for not having enough triangle bandages in the first aid kits. SM protested to the head judge "how can my patrols not have enough triangle bandages, when every single one of them has one around their neck?" The patrols got their points back.

                  Bit of advice, never use a necker signed by Green Bar Bill.

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                  • #27
                    BSA is definitely NOT "out of the necker business".

                    BSA National Supply has a number of options for neckers, including a custom necker -

                    http://www.scoutstuff.org/bsa-necker...mbroidery.html

                    http://www.scoutstuff.org/screen-pri...kerchiefs.html

                    http://www.scoutstuff.org/custom-neckerchiefs.html

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                    • jblake47
                      jblake47 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      My was set to go with the red with black. I went down to the Scout Shop and they didn't have any in inventory, I had picked up the last two. So they special ordered 3 more. They called me a couple of days later and I was told that item was discontinued and no longer available.

                      Stosh

                    • Eagle92
                      Eagle92 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Scoutnut, They are not selling as many choices as they use to. And when i talked to a council distributor, I was told by them that national is getting rid of what they have, and then you will have to special order or go to thrid party vendors. Reson being " Everyone wears bolos now."

                      As Col Sherman Potter, USA would say "HORSEHOCKEY!"

                    • ScoutNut
                      ScoutNut commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I HATE bolos!!!

                  • #28
                    The Troop of my yoooth ,designed the necker and it had a 4" embroidered patch with boots kicking up dust mottoed "Always On The Go!" It is a big one, about 30" on a side, triangular. And it was used for all the usual stuff: slings, flags, signalling, .
                    Once a year, usually in February, I sponsor a neckerslide contest for the boys, and I give prizes, I collect coupons from local establishments for free tacos, ice cream, etc.. I get to display my collection of souvenir neckers and woggles. I get to talk about the history of the necker, and what has changed. Even the adults get interested. Some years, lots of entries, this year, only four..
                    I enlist a local art teacher for my judge, so there is no "favoritism". I've seen nicely carved ones (Woodcarving MB at camp) to artfully contrived ducttape to a Smurf toy glued to a pipecleaner. In the years I have been doing this, the Troop has gone from a tiny cravat ESL necker to a 30" custom one, not like my old one, but distinctive.

                    Overcollar, undercollar, no collar, tucked in collar, don't matter none. Encourage them to wear it proudly , usefully, as a mark of being a Scout. Not every Scout has a uniform to wear, but every Scout should have a Necker.

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                    • #29

                      Matching Mountains with the Boy Scout Uniform by Reimer (1928) is now available in a reprint! A interesting book about the history of the Scout uniform. It lists no fewer than 40 (!) uses for the necker.

                      http://www.amazon.com/Matching-Mount.../dp/143256918X


                      Or the original! http://www.boyscoutstore.com/matchin...niform-en.html
                      Last edited by SSScout; 02-26-2014, 12:32 PM.

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