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  • Patrol Method

    In my troop we have 3 patrols of about 5-8 each(it varies on outings), we have patrols that only act as patrols when they are required: cooking, patrol meeting within troop meetings, patrol vs patrol games, etc. When scouts have ideas they usually go right to the SPL, there is a lack of communication between scouts and their patrol leaders(PLs). Also, I know that patrols can do their own activities outside of the troop, i.e. merit badges, but while I've tried to get them to organize stuff like that, they just don't seem to want to. They seem to be satisfied doing the same games and knot relays that we seem to do every single meeting and the once a month campouts. How do I get them active as patrols rather than just as a troop?
    Experimenting with the color system.

  • #2
    Make the patrols be long lasting patrols and let the scouts pick. Initially, put all the new scouts in a patrol. If they want to switch to be with a friend, fine. But let them pick.

    People voluntarily get together with friends and people they enjoy. People will not long-term (years) socialize in forced groups.

    Comment


    • #3
      My troop is similar. You'll find lots of discussion about this on the previous version of this site (http://old.scouter.com/). Here a couple of the items that I've gleaned from it all ...

      When you go camping, how far apart are the patrols from each other and the adult leaders? In an open field, they should be a football fields distance apart.
      Now, sometimes in the tortuous hills where you and I live, that's not that practical. But the idea is that as patrols get used to living with each other at a distance apart (only coming together for assemblies or emergencies), they'll get it into their heads that scheduling stuff on their own isn't that far fetched.

      The part about not assigning boys to a patrol, but rather having friends choose to be together -- well that's like Fred said. If your patrol-mate is already your friend it's that much easier to pull together with him and do an activity. In fact I'd wager that there's a group of you boys who are already doing something together this weekend, they just aren't doing it with their patrol.

      Going directly to the SPL is a sign that the PL is not the boy's buddy. It happens. The SPL should tactfully bring it up to the PL. For example, "Joey came to me with an idea that he seemed really enthused about. Did he tell you about it?" If not, say "You or your APL should talk to him and see if it's something ya'll would like to make happen."

      Finally, patrol leaders should report at the meetings and "talk a little smack" to one another. "Since our last meeting, we Owls accomplished ...", "Well since our last meeting we Crows have decided to propose this troop activity ..." "Well we Ballistic Bluegills are proud to announce that two more boys made tenderfoot ..." The SPL should allow a little time at each troop meeting for a couple of patrol reports.

      Those are the little things that an SPL and his assistant can do to move toward your objective. Of course he needs the support of his SM for that (and sometimes the SM needs to be really thick skinned and able to back adults away so the boys have that latitude), but it sounds like your SPL would have that in your troop.

      Comment


      • #4
        "how far apart are the patrols from each other and the adult leaders?" Usually about 15-20 feet between patrols, shared cooking areas most of the time(that gets really annoying, but they don't want to setup another dining fly). The adults are usually about 50 feet away and hardly ever come to our campsite.
        "The part about not assigning boys to a patrol, but rather having friends choose to be together"
        The current SPL, whose term ends Monday, took all the patrols and assigned them according to attendance. With only 5 guys in a couple patrols, 2 pairs of brothers in the troop, and the fact that our troop lacks good, long-term planning, we frequently have scouts who attend the meetings but don't attend outings. Before we redid the patrols 2 patrols each had a pair of brothers, and if for some reason they couldn't go that left 1 patrol with only 3 people, the patrol redo also split up brothers.
        "a sign that the PL is not the boy's buddy"
        Exactly, the patrol elections rarely pick the right person for the job, instead they pick the person they like the most. Which is one of the reasons why, if I get elected SPL on Monday, I am going to try to make it where SPL and ASPL nominate PLs and then let patrols vote, rather than patrols nominating and voting.
        "Finally, patrol leaders should report at the meetings and "talk a little smack" to one another."
        We have PLCs about once every 2 months, really the only thing that gets accomplished is planning what happens in each meeting. Mainly because the PLs can't even tell you what rank the APL is, much less what they are accomplishing.

        Comment


        • qwazse
          qwazse commented
          Editing a comment
          Regardless of who gets elected, you'll be able to help with the discussion among the responsible boys in your troop. You've clearly been putting a lot of thought into this.

          Definitely try to change your camping arrangements. Your adults are on the right track. Ideally, you put the patrol sites on opposite sides of the adult site with at least a stones throw between sites. Don't worry about that patrol of three. They'll be fine. Some hints: you don't always need a fly. One three-man tent sets up in a hurry. Single burner stove can cook up soup for three easily.

          The best way to get someone to do what you want is to make them think it was their idea. Your first act as SPL should be to listen. Ask they guys how they like their patrols. What could be better about them.

          Ideally, the "PL Reports" are part of each meeting. Not the PLC. Lacking any major activity they should be short and sweet. You might want to give them a default phrase "Sir, the Owl patrol has nothing to report tonight, but y'all just wait until next week."

          Like Stosh said below, most SPLs start out as "top down" managers and quickly learn how to be a "come along-side" leader.

        • EagleScout441
          EagleScout441 commented
          Editing a comment
          "You've clearly been putting a lot of thought into this." Thanks.
          "you don't always need a fly." I mentioned the dining fly, on pretty much every campout we setup 2 dining flys, one for the adults, one for the scouts. Sometimes the adults will sleep in the dining fly(we only have one female adult and she doesn't come on all the outings), and sometimes they'll setup tents. Us scouts setup all three patrols' cooking station under that 1 dining fly. The scout cooking areas are almost always together(sometimes a little too close it seems). They prefer having the fly, but they don't want to setup more than 1. So if it rains about 1/2 of the boys will huddle under that one fly while the remaining few will go with their buddies and play cards in their tent.
          "One three-man tent sets up in a hurry." We don't have three-man tents, that's one thing about our troop, there're kind of cheap. Two man tents are all we have, to get a picture of how big these tents are the average size ground pad, like that one you get at walmart, if you put two of those in a tent they will not only touch the corners of the tent but also overlap each other about an inch. When the troop got new ones they didn't bother to buy the ones with vestibules, so basically you either lay your gear on your feet or you use it as a pillow. And a few of the old ones. that have vestibules, are covered in patches. That's why I got my own tent, but it started leaking and I've been wanting to buy a hammock anyway, so now I have an excuse to get one, I just have to wait a couple months to get some birthday money so I can afford it. Oh yeah, and the adults' tents are a lot nicer than ours, figures.
          " "PL Reports" are part of each meeting. Not the PLC."
          If that's the case we do nothing of the sort.

      • #5
        There's always a problem when rules are dictated down to the patrols. If they are told and they don't like it, they vote with their feet. The SM tells he SPL what to do, the SPL tells the PLs tell the patrols what to do. For me, reverse it. The patrols decide what they what to do and then tell the SPL at the PLC what they have planned. The SPL reports the activities to the SM. Then the SM and SPL mentor, assist, do what it takes to help make it happen. At least the boys are doing what they want. If another patrol catches on to being able to really have some fun, the others will follow. A PL that doesn't work out with his boys will soon get replaced, which in my book can happen any time the patrol decides. There's no such thing as voting every 6 months and then putting up with a mistake. If someone gets elected and doesn't do the work, he's out and someone that wants to make things happen takes over.

        Yeah, that font thingy is fun.

        Stosh

        Comment


        • #6
          "There's no such thing as voting every 6 months and then putting up with a mistake. If someone gets elected and doesn't do the work, he's out and someone that wants to make things happen takes over." You have no idea how much I wish that was true in my troop!

          Comment


          • jblake47
            jblake47 commented
            Editing a comment
            I didn't have the POR's wear the patch. One can't see it from a distance anyway so what's the point. Were the boys earning their rank's POR responsibility requirement? Sure, when they got to the BOR they had to be able to justify it to the board. If not, it was their problem. I had one boy "earn" POR requirement under three different PORs in his 6 month time. He was PL of one of the patrols, but researched a new summer camp, organized, registered, and lined up the logistics to go (Scribe). He also lined up all the camp gear necessary and made sure that was all ordered for the week of camp (QM) and then for the week at camp, he served as SPL for the troop because he knew the most about what was going on. A different boy did the same thing for the camporees, Any boy in the troop could take on any activity for leadership (POR) credit. One boy took on popcorn sales. A new scout on his third meeting, volunteered on organizing a service project at a local park. Another boy (Instructor) mentored him through the details.

            Basically each boy journaled his POR involvement and had it as a record for his BOR "brag-time".

            My boys had two options when it came to BOR's. Either they sat there and waited for the Board to ask them questions with which they had their notes handy to supply answers, or 2) come in, introduce oneself and make a 15-20 minute report on what you have done to earn the rank. I had one boy do this for his Eagle BOR and the panel only asked him 4 questions and then had to interrupt him in his reply to go on to the next question. At first I thought they were kind of upset with him, but the next day they invited him to be the speaker at the Golden Eagle Banquet that year

          • EagleScout441
            EagleScout441 commented
            Editing a comment
            He did take the invitation didn't he?

          • jblake47
            jblake47 commented
            Editing a comment
            We had to sedate him, but he did fine!

        • #7
          I lost the election for SPL and didn't get ASPL either. The new SPL is more "popular" than I am but, from what I've seen, doesn't have the leadership ability and dedication required to be SPL, he is also 1 1/2 years younger than I am, which is just insulting. The new ASPL is a 17 year old Star Scout who joined the troop about 5 years ago, but last night was the first meeting he has showed up to since January 2012, and they still elected him over me. So now I'm going to focus on finishing all my partially complete merit badges and then join Venturing.

          Comment


          • Eagledad
            Eagledad commented
            Editing a comment
            Khaliela is right, a trusted loyal person doesn't quit when The chips are down. If the election was a popularity thing, then the troop needs you more than ever. You need to show true unselfish servant leadership and be the SPLs most trusted assistant. Those scouts stick out. Good post Khaliela

          • EagleScout441
            EagleScout441 commented
            Editing a comment
            I'm tired of doing the job without getting the recognition and the person who holds the position gets the recognition even though they didn't do the work. I had the same problem with patrol leader before I was officially elected. The way things are going now, I doubt I'll ever get the chance to serve a term as SPL.
            My contributions not being recognized is 1 of 3 reasons for my leaving to Venturing, the 2nd is because I prefer high adventure over regular car camping, and the 3rd is I'd rather camp with people my own age(out of the 18 people in my troop only 2 are my age, the rest are younger).
            "If the election was a popularity thing, then the troop needs you more than ever. You need to show true unselfish servant leadership and be the SPLs most trusted assistant. Those scouts stick out."
            Honestly, I'd rather watch him fail and be the one to pick up the pieces.

          • Sentinel947
            Sentinel947 commented
            Editing a comment
            "Honestly, I'd rather watch him fail and be the one to pick up the pieces."

            I'm extremely disappointed to hear a Boy Scout have that kind of attitude. Very disappointed. Perhaps your attitude is why your fellow Scouts find you unelectable. However, I don't know you, so I can't say that with any certainty. I'm not trying to insult you with that. Maybe it's just your frustration with the situation.
            I understand your frustration. It was only a four years ago that I was a Senior Patrol Leader in my unit. I remember running for elections for various positions. Now as an Assistant Scoutmaster, I watch as qualified young Scouts sometimes get passed over for positions in ways that leave me scratching my head. Eventually they break through and win.



            Why do you want to be Senior Patrol Leader? I'm not entirely convinced you are seeking the position for the right reasons. That's always a discussion I have with Scouts in my unit before they run for any position.

            I don't think there is anything Khaliela, Eagledad, Jblake , myself or others could say to convince you to continue on with the Boy Scout side of the program. Venturing is a worthwhile program and you may find the collective leadership aspect more up your alley.

            I advise you to take the advice to heart many of the experienced men and women of this forum offer to you. Many of us were Scouts as Youth and have experienced the same things you are currently going through. Regardless, I wish you the best of luck in your future Scouting and in life in general.



            Sentinel947

            Eagle Scout-2011

        • #8
          I too was never elected SPL for about 8 election cycles.Sr. year in HS was too crazy and I didn't even run. But I did the job when it was needed to be done. Was I the most qualified, not at first but over time definitely. Was oneor two of those elections popularity contests, absolutely.

          But I stuck around. I did what needed to be done. I helped those who asked for it.

          Sometimes being a true leader is knwoing whento step away and accepting defeat.

          Comment


          • #9
            Well, you lose some, and then you lose some. That smarts, but once you get beyond the discouragement, you need to relax and think about what didn't appeal to the younger boys. Personnally, I think a 6 minute speech would have turned me off! But here are some things that I've seen to be off-putting in other boys ... Incessant practical jokes. Cussing and off color jokes. Obsession with the opposite sex. Lack of troop pride. Only shakes some boys' hands before meeting starts. Chances are you can come up with one or two others that may or may not apply. Then you need to decide if you need to work on any of them. Then pick one, and try to polish that rough edge a little. This has nothing to do with running again, it has to do with milking an experience for all it's worth. As for wrapping up those badges, that's a great plan! Rack up a palm or two. Then as you pick your crew (sounds like you have a good one in mind) look to work on your Ranger Award. In the process you will be a great help to your troop and crew and be on your way to that NOA award.

            Comment


            • #10
              Wearing a patch and getting credit for advancement don't make you a good leader. Leaving when the troop needs you the most doesn't make you a good leader either. Getting "credit" for one's work doesn't make you a good leader and looking at the disappointments instead of the opportunities doesn't make you a good leader either.

              Okay, with that being said, what have you left? I had one Eagle candidate that made a major mistake as he was rolling down the final stretch for his Eagle. As SM I told him I wouldn't sign a letter of recommendation (council required) until I saw some real leadership from him. Then I took away all his POR positions he was filling in the troop. I said, "Now show me your leadership" and walked away. For years he had heard me preach about leading from the back of the pack. Sport coaches do not play the game, orchestra conductors make no noise, and driver's education instructors don't sit behind the wheel.

              You said, "I'm tired of doing the job without getting the recognition and the person who holds the position gets the recognition even though they didn't do the work."

              WELCOME to the real world. This is how 99% of the world works. Get used to it now because it's only going to get worse as you get older.

              ""I had the same problem with patrol leader before I was officially elected. The way things are going now, I doubt I'll ever get the chance to serve a term as SPL."

              Okay, now re-read my second paragraph above. Then read it again.

              "My contributions not being recognized is 1 of 3 reasons for my leaving to Venturing," - Read paragraph 2 again.

              "the 2nd is because I prefer high adventure over regular car camping" - and what have you done to take the LEAD on changing that in the troop?

              "and the 3rd is I'd rather camp with people my own age(out of the 18 people in my troop only 2 are my age, the rest are younger)." - and who needs your leadership more, the younger boys or your buddies? You will get far less leadership opportunities hanging out with your buddies than you will with mentoring a troop of younger boys.

              "If the election was a popularity thing, then the troop needs you more than ever. You need to show true unselfish servant leadership and be the SPLs most trusted assistant. Those scouts stick out." - couldn't say it better.

              "Honestly, I'd rather watch him fail and be the one to pick up the pieces." - One never obtains true leadership greatness at the failures of others. They do a better job on their own efforts.

              So, when all is said and done, if I was your SM, I'd hand you an application for Venturing and tell you to be careful not to let the door hit you on the butt on the way out.

              If you can't lead regardless of the situation you find yourself in, you're really not the level of leader you think you are. And by the way, the Eagle candidate I talked about? Yeah, he got his Eagle but he worked his butt off for 6 months before I signed. At his Eagle Court of Honor, he called me up and presented me with his mentor pin. He was crying as he pinned it on me.

              You have a tremendous opportunity staring you in the face and you can't even see it. Don't run away, roll up your sleeves and start learning how to really lead. And I'll assure you it isn't in any patch or assignment of POR that's going to determine that.

              Stosh

              Comment


              • jblake47
                jblake47 commented
                Editing a comment
                Oh, by the way, as far as elections go? If one thinks themselves to be a great leader, then why is no one following? Might want to take a personal inventory of what skills you are lacking that keeps the other boys from following? The first step in good leadership is taking care of those that follow. If one does that, they will follow you anywhere. If they think for a moment that the leader is thinking only of themselves, they will desert in droves.

            • #11
              One more thing to consider ... some of us don't think SPL's are necessary until a troop has 4 or more patrols to coordinate. So, if we're right, you were effectively running for a position your troop didn't need. Your platform seemed to be making stronger patrols, which might just as simply be done by NOBODY being SPL and ASPL! Then the PLs and APLs would have to put forth real effort to keep the troop running. (E.g., they might have to rotate leading the meeting, set-up, and closing.) If that is true, then if, because of tradition, everyone is insisting that there be SPL/ASPL then you only want figureheads in those positions so that the PLs step it up and do what needs to be done to make your troop strong.

              Comment


              • jblake47
                jblake47 commented
                Editing a comment
                Of course this only works if the SPL/ASPL actually function as figureheads. If they get into the faces of the PL's and try to dictate what the patrols can/can't do, then it's a recipe for disaster. If one wants strong leadership, it begins at the PL level, not the SPL level. With 4+ patrols in a troop and a supportive rather than dictatorial, one can develop strong leadership 4+ times faster in a troop than relying on an SPL to try and run a whole troop, which in reality impossible to do anyway. In my troop, the SPL was the #1 leadership mentor for the PL's and did not run the troop or the patrols.

            • #12
              EagleScout441, jblake47 sure has a harsh way of saying things. However, if you look at what he said with the idea that he's really trying to help you be a better scout and not slam you, there are a lot of good ideas. I'll add my two cents as well.

              I noticed that the original topic was that you wanted ideas on how to get the patrol method working better. Upon discussion this changed into the fact that you were being bypassed for being SPL by someone younger and less qualified. How about digging a little deeper? Danger ahead: This might hurt but my intentions are to help you do your best. You said the vote is just a popularity contest. Apparently you have never won the popularity contest. We both know that it should be more than a popularity contest but I think popularity is important. Leadership requires the skill to get others to do something. You have to motivate people to do something they might not want to do. Cleaning dishes, organizing a campout, showing up early to practice flags, .... Part of motivation involves making a connection with someone. If you're seen as just a guy that tells others what to do then there is no connection. You can ask them to do the best thing in the world but if there's no connection they will ignore you. If you're seen as the guy that can have fun with people and cares that they get what they want and also knows what's going on and also asks people to do things then that's different. First, there's a connection (you can have fun and you look out for them). So when you ask them to do something they will follow you.

              As others have said, you have an opportunity here. Learn how to make a connection. You don't have to be the most popular, you just have to be one of them. Have fun with the scouts. Bring a deck of cards to a campout, teach the scouts stupid card games and play them in the tent until midnight. When they want to do something fun or silly, go along with them. Make a fool of yourself. By making the connection you will learn more about the scouts you want to lead. That will make you a better leader because you'll understand where they are coming from. They will also learn to trust that you have their best interests in mind. Then they will vote for you.

              Comment


              • jblake47
                jblake47 commented
                Editing a comment
                EagleScout441: MattR makes a good point. If you are thinking I am in anyway slamming you, you have totally misread my intention. I have worked with youth groups for over 40 years and have seen a ton of guys and gals step up to the plate and do some fantastic things. I have seen a lot of them as well, blowing me off and taking their chances. The choice is yours as to how you want to handle it.

                Leadership? Getting people to do something they may not want to? Nope! The new guy gets stuck with doing the dishes. This is normal and he's not happy about it. However, if an older scout comes over and says, "let me help you." Okay, what's that new guy going to think? Does he have to like you? Nope. Are you going to be his best friend? Nope. But if he has a problem, who's he going to turn to?

                You hit the campsite, you're the first out the car door and you yell out, "I'm going to put up the dining fly, who's going to help?" Pete steps up and volunteers to help, you turn to Tom and Bill and ask them to set up two tents while you and Pete put up the fly? Sure, as long as they don't have to help with the fly!

                John has to start cooking dinner. You stop by John and ask, "Do you have everything out of the trailer?" "Need help?" Who's John's new best friend?

                New guy is trying to learn his knots. He's got the book in his lap and struggling. You walk by and offer to help.

                Your buddy lost his necker, you offer to help look for it.....

                Joe needs to head to the latrine, but his buddy refuses to go with him. You announce you need to go (whether you do or not) and help him out.

                Okay, next election rolls around. Are you any of these guys' best friend? Probably not, but who are they going to vote for?

                I saw one fella at Centennial Jambo pull this off while wandering around the 4 patrols of the contingent. I don't think any one of the boys from SPL down to the lowliest scout, not get some assistance from him at one time or another. On the second to the last day, he turned his ankle, and I never saw so many people stopping by asking him if he needed anything. They packed up his gear and tent and got everything including him onto the bus, short of carrying him. Surprising, that out of all the scouts on that trip, he's the only one I remember by name.

                Seriously, servant leadership is really not all that hard! (That's how you lead from the back seat!)

                Stosh

              • Sentinel947
                Sentinel947 commented
                Editing a comment
                JBlake, if servant leadership was a communicable disease, that post would have just given me it. Very thoughtful and well done!

            • #13
              Some folks are born with a servant style of behavior and are naturals with servant leadership nomatter the culture of the program. But to develop a servant leadership style for all the youth leaders in the troop, a servant lifestyle must be part of the culture. And that really depends on the adults, or more pointedly, the dominant adult leader who is typically the SM. It's very difficult to teach and old dog new tricks because if an older scout wasn't brought up in a servant leadership culture, they struggle to change to any other kind of style. I certainly wouldn't give up hope on EG144, but he has a difficult road a head if his troop culture doesn't encourage a servant style of behavior. I wish him the best, this can be a life changing opportunity. Barry

              Comment


              • #14
                EagleScout441: I will never hold a "leadership" position in BSA for the reason that I am not Christian. My council has threatened to revoke our charter if I am ever placed in a leadership position.

                Am I upset about the decision? yes.
                Do I think it's unfair? yes
                Is there any thing I can do about it? No
                Do I still serve? yes.

                I am the most qualified adult in the troop to serve as SM and our current SM knows it. When the boys need to learn anything about plants and animals he sends them to me. I built the Klondike sleds we still use back when my boys were in cubs. I am certified in First Aid and CPR. I am a volunteer Hunters Education instructor and can help the boys with shooting sports, including Archery and have spent many a hour at the archery range helping lads finish up partials from camp. I am highly organized and equally adventurous. I'm everything you'd want in an SM; but I will never be able to wear he uniform. That dose not prevent me from serving my unit.

                True leadership is doing what's right because it's right; not because you can get another patch or be recognized in some way. Life isn't fair.

                So I ask you again, what did you win by losing?

                I won the freedom to do whatever I want to do with those boys because there is no way they can punish me . . . Sometimes life's greatest reward is to be denied a position of responsibility.

                Comment


                • #15
                  "I noticed that the original topic was that you wanted ideas on how to get the patrol method working better. Upon discussion this changed into the fact that you were being bypassed for being SPL by someone younger and less qualified."
                  The sudden change was caused by the fact that I was turned down for SPL(for the 5th time) this past Monday evening, and I was extremely aggravated and disappointed, hence this comment:"Honestly, I'd rather watch him fail and be the one to pick up the pieces." Sorry about that, I probably should have waited till I got my composure back and opened a new thread asking for advice/help.
                  As far as a few of you commenting on my leaving to Venturing, I attended a week long Venturing camp that let Boy Scouts in this year. It was July 15-21. Since seeing how Venturing operates and experiencing the HA emphasis and, in the case of this camp, high organization and efficiency, I can now see how little my troop actually does and how disorganized it tends to be. You could say that I got a taste of the good life and now I can't come back. The possibility of becoming SPL/ASPL is what has kept me in Boy Scouts a little longer. I don't plan on completely abandoning my troop, but instead having dual membership and having more focus the Venturing program rather than Boy Scouts.
                  When it comes to servant leadership, that is what I've been trying to do. For example, at summer camp we always setup what we call Hiltons, large rectangular dining flys with aluminum frames. I had the opportunity to serve as SPL during summer camp, and I used what I call the "lead by example" technique. For the Hiltons, I got together all the guys who had never assembled one before, showed them exactly what is to be done to assemble them and then helped them assemble it, while the ASPL helped the experienced guys setup a second one. I used this technique throughout the week, from building camp gadgets to tying knots.
                  When it comes to "being their best friend" I try to do that as well. During free time a lot of the guys like to play cards, so do I, so I am usually joining them. I also am a magician so when we are around the campfire or waiting on the cooks to finish up I usually get out a pack of cards or sponge balls(AKA clown noses) and do magic tricks for everybody, including a fire effect that went over quite well.
                  I have a 2 explanations as to why I wasn't(haven't been) elected. 1. I am very straight forward, I "tell it how I see it," if someone is doing something wrong, knots, etc, I point out it out to them and then help them correct it. While this can be a good thing, a lot of people don't like it. And of course sometimes I'm the one that is wrong and people really don't like being told that they're wrong when they're actually right. 2. We had four visitors at the meeting, for three of them it was their 2nd meeting but they hadn't been on any outings, for the other it was his first time with our troop, the point is that they were allowed to vote in the election. We had about fifteen people including them.

                  Comment


                  • qwazse
                    qwazse commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yep, one or two on this forum have typed a harsh word in the heat of the moment. It might have exargerrated how badly you felt at the moment, but hopefully the replies it generates will be of use to some scouts and scouters down the road.

                    Venturing is a heady brew. So is a week with a solid patrol-method troop. It's easy to lose patience with folks who don't have that vision.

                    Learning how to be a little less blunt is an ongoing skill. And practicing "I'm sorry" and "I was wrong" is tough. (It got easier once I got married, but if I were you, I'd just practice in a mirror for a few more years.)

                    Establishing who is eligible to vote is a very important part of parliamentary procedure. Your troop might need to think about that. A problem like that is certainly something our troop committee would want to hear about from any board of review of a fellow going up for his palm.

                  • jblake47
                    jblake47 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    No warrior shows up for battle without knowing what weapons they have brought.

                    No worker shows up for work without knowing what tools they they have brought.

                    No teacher shows up for class without knowing what skills they have brought.

                    There's a pattern here. Self-awareness of what one brings to the game is "armed" to accomplish the task/challenge that lays ahead. No one ever built a road on smooth ground. There's always obstacles along the way. How one addresses them before beginning the challenge often times determines the outcome. If one knows they are overly "straight forward" and they know it produces less than stellar results, then by simple awareness, are now capable of trying something different. Those that stubbornly refuse to learn will simply continue to beat their heads against the wall.

                    And the last suggestion I leave is: "Never let them see you sweat." There are a few out there in the world that love to push peoples' buttons. It's a game for them. If one reacts to these kinds of people, they will continue their little game with you. However, if one doesn't react the way they are supposed to, then the game is no fun and they move on.

                    I have a pin-button that resides on my nightstand so I see it every morning when I get up. I love it's message: "Don't tell people your troubles. 80% don't care and the other 20% are glad." It really helps me get through the day.

                    Stosh
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