Jump to content
mrkstvns

Can you handle allergic reactions? (Anaphylaxis)

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Terasec said:

the BSA  medical form I have authorizes camp office to administer the meds its not a blanket authorization for all

have it in front of me as going to camp on sunday

this is a BSA local council med form

" the following medications are available in the camp health office and will be administered at the discretion of the camp medical officer. If approval is ordered by the healthcare provider below"

 

Camps can have their own sets of rules, some internal, some dictated by the state because they're camps.  In addition to whatever forms your camp requires for summer camp your troop should require the BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (AHMR) for everybody in the troop and anybody going on an outing with you.

"For any and all Scouting activities, all participants must complete Part A and Part B."

https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/HealthSafety/pdf/680-001_AB.pdf

The two authorizations are not necessarily in conflict with each other.  The camp has an authorization to administer OTC and the troop has authorization to administer OTC.  Given what the camp form says you could check with them for their opinion of whether you refer everything to them while at camp.  Our camp has us send everything above band aid level to them.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, T2Eagle said:

Camps can have their own sets of rules, some internal, some dictated by the state because they're camps.  In addition to whatever forms your camp requires for summer camp your troop should require the BSA Annual Health and Medical Record (AHMR) for everybody in the troop and anybody going on an outing with you.

"For any and all Scouting activities, all participants must complete Part A and Part B."

https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/HealthSafety/pdf/680-001_AB.pdf

The two authorizations are not necessarily in conflict with each other.  The camp has an authorization to administer OTC and the troop has authorization to administer OTC.  Given what the camp form says you could check with them for their opinion of whether you refer everything to them while at camp.  Our camp has us send everything above band aid level to them.

 

Statement

"Administration of the above medications is approved for youth by: "

is on form b

applies to all scouts at all outings

it is not authorization to administer any OTC meds at will

it is intended for scouts that are currently taking OTC meds for various ailments, those meds must be listed on form b for anyone to administer them,

such scouts should have their own meds and leaders advised of their condition and what meds to give them and when

just about all states have regs on who can administer what meds to others

cant even give Tylenol to others without authorization

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Terasec said:

you skipped the line that says

"Administration of the above medications is approved for youth by: "

OTC medications youth is taking must be listed

its not a blanket authorization to administer any OTC meds at will

Correct.  If the parent signs that line, they are approving blanket OTC except where notes. 100% of the forms that we have received have that signed.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Eagle1993 said:

Correct.  If the parent signs that line, they are approving blanket OTC except where notes. 100% of the forms that we have received have that signed.   

No it is not a blanket approval

approved otc must be listed

can only administer listed otc meds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Terasec said:

No it is not a blanket approval

approved otc must be listed

can only administer listed otc meds

That is not how any Troop or Pack I have been involved with reads that statement.

@RichardB May have some additional input   

 The statement seems clear:


YES NO Non-prescription medication administration is authorized with these exceptions:_______________________________________________
Administration of the above medications is approved for youth by:

parent’s signature 

 

The section above this is to simply list any meds (including OTC) the scout is on.  It is not to limit the OTCs.  Limiting OTCs is done on the exception line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I understand the back and forth of differing opinion..... 

In broad terms, 51 weeks of the year the statement on the AHMR covers administration of OTC's that a troop might have in their FA kit or that Scoutmaster Bessie has in hers.    Tylenol, Benadryl, would be common.    Unless normally taken they would not necessarily be listed by a participants on their medication matrix.    In the distant past, that would have been a solution to list them all Terasec. It still could be for you or your youth.  Would say it would be okay to say list 200 mg of ibruprofen as needed for pain.  

The week in camp, you have a council health supervisor who has authority over how a camp manages this, following local, state, or other requirements.    

And let's not forget, at the end of the day, the management of the medical condition is between a youth and their parent.     

As Eagle1993 mentions, most would check okay and leave the field blank unless there was an known reaction.   Resource:     https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/HealthSafety/pdf/SAFE_USE_OF_MEDICATION_IN_SCOUTING.pdf  

To the OP.   Something to review. https://www.scouting.org/health-and-safety/incident-report/incident-reviews/allergies-and-anaphylaxis/ 

And some guideance:  https://filestore.scouting.org/filestore/HealthSafety/pdf/2013Guidelines_Managing_Food_Allergies.pdf

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its best for everyone to consult with medical professionals on the topic

as first aid instructors have told me, otc meds are comfort meds you wont be saving anyones life with otc meds, you can be exasperating an existing problem by masking symptoms making it more difficult for others to diagnose

,  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×