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Eagle94-A1

Bear Repellent Recommendation

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Plus you can use it in a boat without accidentally shooting holes in the hull, lol. But snakes and gators don't seem to notice the noise. Works great on seagulls.

I knew you knew... :)

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But if some kid was playing around with it in the middle of the night and it went off, there'd be a lot of sleeping bags needing cleaning in the morning. 

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Well, I for one wouldn't carry a .22 for bear.  :)  But a 9mm fired into the air would make a noise most bears haven't heard and would do well at getting their attention.  The name of the game is to make them more afraid of you than you are of them.  I was at a fishing camp in Canada, like the smell of fish isn't going to attract a bear or two?  They were using fireworks to keep the bears away.  it was working for them. 

 

9MM was actually mentioned by someone. Trek leader said " Too Heavy"

 

Forgot to add, I had a brand recommended, approved by the EPA, so I ordered it. Thanks guys.

 

I just hope I won't need it.

Edited by Eagle94-A1

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Nothing like startling a 8ft 900lbs grizzly with an air horn. 

Only 900# at 8'? That's one anorexic bear. Probably'd be happy that you echo-located a filling meal. :)

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Nothing like startling a 8ft 900lbs grizzly with an air horn. 

 

Famous last words: "Well, it sounded like a good idea at the time."

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You don't need spray. At philmont just do as they say about bears. It's mostly an issue of keeping the smells of food away from you. They are anal about it so just do as they say and you'll be fine. Bears don't care about people, they do like our food. Well, grizzlies have short tempers but you won't see any in philmont.

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You don't need spray. At philmont just do as they say about bears. It's mostly an issue of keeping the smells of food away from you. They are anal about it so just do as they say and you'll be fine. Bears don't care about people, they do like our food. Well, grizzlies have short tempers but you won't see any in philmont.

 

In fact, I think if you look at the attacks that have happened at Philmont it was as a result of poor bear protocol.

 

If I am not mistaken, the 2013 attack near Baldy was of a Scout who took a Snickers in to his tent to rest and relax. The bear wandering around caught the smell and went to take a bit (of the candy bar). It just happened to be in the kid's hand.

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In 2014 at Philmont we saw a bear but he wasn't interested in us. He went his way and we went ours. At Philmont, you bear bag all food and anything with a scent. All food waste is strained and the wash\rinse water goes into a sump (plastic piping that goes into the ground). Because of the amount of waste Philmont no longer permits you to use turkey bags (over your bowls). The only time I felt unsafe was when we were heading up to the top of the Tooth and we had to use lightning protocol.

Edited by Mountaineer

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In 2000 when I was at Philmont, a bear cleared out the Tooth of Time campsite and the boys had to evacuate back to base camp in the middle of the night.  Sometimes precautions don't work.  Being lucky helps, but not always reliable.

 

By the way, I live in the woods, I carry a gun, there are black bear in the area.  I don't want to startle one without something serious to protect myself with.  My neighbor let me know they are coming out of their dens now, he saw one last week.

Edited by Stosh

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If I am not mistaken, the overwhelming majority of bear attacks at all Scout camps are caused by people not following bear protocol. Philmont is a perfect example. When you look at why bears were in camp they can trace it back to food or other smellables brought inside the Bearmuda Triangle.

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Unfortunately that is not a tried and true rule @@Krampus  There was a family that did not clean up their mess after meals and the bears came in a cleaned up for them.  They thought this was rather nice.  All they need do is sanitize the cookware and one would be all set for the next meal.

 

However, the next group came in and did it "according to Hoyle".  Everything was done up just the way it was supposed to be done.  Bears came in looking for breakfast, didn't find anything so they went through everything to make sure.  Totally tore the campsite to shreds. 

 

Sometimes the bears aren't the problem.

Edited by Stosh

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Unfortunately that is not a tried and true rule @@Krampus  There was a family that did not clean up their mess after meals and the bears came in a cleaned up for them.  They thought this was rather nice.  All they need do is sanitize the cookware and one would be all set for the next meal.

 

However, the next group came in and did it "according to Hoyle".  Everything was done up just the way it was supposed to be done.  Bears came in looking for breakfast, didn't find anything so they went through everything to make sure.  Totally tore the campsite to shreds. 

 

Sometimes the bears aren't the problem.

 

As I said, the majority of the problem is people not following bear protocol. If the first family had done what they are supposed to the second family would not have had the issue.

 

I don't stay in a camp where there are bears if, after doing an inspection, I find ANY food or smellables around. Talking to rangers about problem spots will help you pick you camp site too.

 

As far as Scout camps go, reading their incident reports you will see nearly all of the reports have egregious violations of bear protocol. 

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As I said, the majority of the problem is people not following bear protocol. If the first family had done what they are supposed to the second family would not have had the issue.

 

I don't stay in a camp where there are bears if, after doing an inspection, I find ANY food or smellables around. Talking to rangers about problem spots will help you pick you camp site too.

 

As far as Scout camps go, reading their incident reports you will see nearly all of the reports have egregious violations of bear protocol. 

 

Totally agree.  When one goes uninvited into someone else's home, they better know the rules.  THEY are the intruders, not the bears.

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