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evmori

Charter Presentation

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I need some help. I am presenting our charter to the church that sponsors us this Sunday (2/24/2002) during Scout Sunday. I'm tired of doing the same old routine. Any ideas?

 

Thanks

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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this is awfully long, I would just post the site I got it from, but I dont remember :(

 

It is from 1916 about what a scout is, like I said, it may be long, but in a church setting I think it would be powerful to hear what was expected of a scout then and what we expect now

 

A SCOUT: He enjoys a hike through the woods more than he does a walk over the city's streets. He can tell north or south or east or west by the "signs." He can tie a knot that will hold, he can climb a tree which seems impossible to others, he can swim a river, he can pitch a tent, he can mend a tear in his trousers, he can tell you which fruits and seeds are poisonous and which are not, he can sight nut-bearing trees from a distance; he can reef a sail or take his trick at the wheel, and can pull an oar or use paddles and sculls; he knows the stars by name and can find his way by them; he can identify birds and animals and fish and knows the ways and habitat of each.

 

 

A scout walks through the woods with silent tread. No dry twigs snap under his feet and no loose stones turn over and throw him off his balance. His eyes are keen and he sees many things that others do not see. He sees tracks and signs which reveal to him the nature and habits of the creatures that made them. He knows how to stalk birds and animals and study them in their natural haunts. He sees much, but is little seen.

 

 

A scout, like an old frontiersman, does not shout his wisdom from the housetops. He possesses the quiet power that comes from knowledge. He speaks softly and answers questions modestly. He knows a braggart but he does not challenge him, allowing the boaster to expose his ignorance by his own loosewagging tongue.

 

 

A scout holds his honor to be his most precious possession, and he would die rather than have it stained. He knows what is his duty and all obligations imposed by duty he fulfills of his own free will. His sense of honor is his only taskmaster, and his honor he guards as jealously as did the knights of old. In this manner a scout wins the confidence and respect of all people.

 

 

A scout can kindle a fire in the forest on the wettest day and he seldom uses more than one match. When no matches can be bad he can still have a fire, for he knows the secret of the rubbing sticks used by the Indians, and he knows how to start a blaze with only his knife blade and a piece of flint. He knows, also, the danger of forest fires, and he kindles a blaze that will not spread. The fire once started, what a meal he can prepare out there in the open! just watch him and compare his appetite with that of a boy who lounges at a lunch counter in a crowded city. He knows the unwritten rules of the campfire and he contributes his share to the pleasures of the council. He also knows when to sit silent before the ruddy embers and give his mind free play.

 

 

A scout practices self-control , for he knows that men who master problems in the world must first master themselves. He keeps a close guard on his temper and never makes a silly spectacle of himself by losing his head. He keeps a close guard on his tongue, for he knows that loud speech is often a cloak to ignorance, that swearing is a sign of weakness, and that untruthfulness shatters the confidence of others. He keeps a close guard on his appetite and eats moderately of food which will make him strong; he never uses alcoholic liquors because he does not wish to poison his body; he desires a clear, active brain, so he avoids tobacco.

 

 

A scout never flinches in the face of danger, for he knows that at such a time every faculty must be alert to preserve his safety and that of others. He knows what to do in case of fire, or panic, or shipwreck; he trains his mind to direct and his body to act. In all emergencies he sets an example of resourcefulness coolness, and courage, and considers the safety of others before that of himself. He is especially considerate of the helpless and weak.

 

 

A scout can make himself known to a brother scout wherever he may be by a method which only scouts can know. He has brothers in every city in the land and in every country in the world. Wherever he goes he can give his signs and be assured of a friendly welcome. He can talk with a brother scout without making a sound or he can make known his message by imitating the click of a telegraph key.

 

 

A scout is kind to everything that lives. He knows that horses, dogs, and cats have their rights and he respects them. A scout prides himself upon doing "good turns," and no day in his life is complete unless he has been of aid to some person.

 

 

A scout does not run away or call for help when an accident occurs. If a person is cut he knows how to stop the flow of blood and gently and carefully bind up the wound. If a person is burned his knowledge tells him how to alleviate the suffering. If any one is dragged from the water unconscious, a Scout at once sets to work to restore respiration and circulation. He knows that not a minute can be lost.

 

 

A scout knows that people expect more of him than they do of other boys and he governs his conduct so that no word of reproach can truthfully be brought against the great brotherhood to which he has pledged his loyalty. He seeks always to make the word " Scout" worthy of the respect of people whose opinions have value. He wears his uniform worthily.

 

 

A scout knows his city as well as he knows the trails in the forest. He can guide a stranger wherever he desires to go, and this knowledge of short-cuts saves him many needless steps. He knows where the police stations are located, where the fire-alarm boxes are placed, where the nearest doctor lives, where the hospitals are, and which is the quickest way to reach them. He knows the names of the city officials and the nature of their duties. A scout is proud of his city and freely offers his services when he can help.

 

 

A scout is a patriot and is always ready to serve his country at a minute's notice. He loves Old Glory and knows the proper forms of offering it respect. He never permits its folds to touch the ground. He knows how his country is governed and who are the men in high authority. He desires a strong body, an alert mind, and an unconquerable spirit, so that he may serve his country in any need. He patterns his life after those of great Americans who have had a high sense of duty and who have served the nation well.

A scout chooses as his motto "Be Prepared," and he seeks to prepare himself for anything-to rescue a companion, to ford a stream, to gather firewood, to help strangers, to distinguish right from wrong, to serve his fellowmen, his country, and his God -- always to "Be Prepared."

 

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OGE,

Thanks for the help. I didn't use what you posted due to the length. My wife & I put something together that was a little shorter. If you're interested, I either post it or e-mail it to you.

 

Thanks again.

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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I love it. Thinking of reading it at a court of honor, or asking the boys to each read a paragraph. OGE, do you know who wrote it?

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Ed, I would also be interested in receiving a copy of what you and your wife eventially used for the Charter Presentation. Please feel free to e-mail it to me at: wickatwork@netzero.net

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I will try to remember to bring it to work tomorrow. Send me your e-mail address & I'll send it off.

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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Ed, Not knowing how old or young your troop is but assuming they have been chartered by the same church (or not) over the years you might give consideration to using a little Troop Scouting History during next year's presentation. People come and go from churches and there may not be anyone there any longer who was there when it all started and "remembers when"...

 

Start with Troop 1 was chartered to (name of church) in (month, day, year) with (number of scouts), Mr. (name) was the first Scoutmaster. Through the years we have had (number) Scoutmasters lead our Scouts. We now have (number) scouts registered and active in the troop program under my direction. Troop (number) has been fortunate to have produced (number) of Eagle Scouts over the years, our most current one (name) who is here to assist in the presentation of this Charter today as well as our newest Scout, (name)who you all may see here several years from now as an Eagle himself.

 

You could go on and ask for everyone in the congregation who has ever been active in Scouting to stand and be recognized and if they have been inactive invite them back into the Brotherhood of Scouting.

 

Thank the church and the congregation for their support in the past and in the future to come, etc...(or let your Unit Commisioner do this)

 

I think you can get the gist from here on out...Grey Fox

 

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Grey Fox,

Yes we are charted by a church (since 1912) and the history was what I had been using for years. But thanks for your input!

 

I forgot to bring what I did do for the presentation today. DUH!

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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Here is what I used on Scout Sunday.

 

Troop 1 has been chartered ny Mt. Lebanon United Methodist Church since 1912. 90 years. That's a very long time. Over these years many things have changed. There have been 2 world wars as well as may other conflicts throughout the world, the industrial revolution changed the way we do things and the 60's challenged our values. September 11th changed the worls forever.

 

Two things have stayed the course of all these changes - Boy Scouting and Troop 1's relationship with this congregation. Atheists wanted to join the Boy Scouts of America but DID NOT want to sat the Oath because it mentioned God. The Boy Scouts said if you cannot say the Oath word for word then you CANNOT join. If you CANNOT profess a belief in God, you CANNOT join. A homosexual Scout leader was removed form the Boy Scouts of America because he was a homosexual. The Boy Scouts of America DOES NOT believe a homosexual is a good role model for young boys. The Supreme Court of the United States agred with the Boy Scouts of America in both cases.

 

As Scoutmaster of Troop1, I would like to thank the pastors & staff of Mt. Lebanon United Methodist Church for their sponsorship over these past 90 years. I would also like to thank the members of this congregation for thier support over these last 90 years. We are sure this relationship will continue for another 90 years.

 

I would now like to present our Charter to the senior pastor Dr. Miller.

 

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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OGE & Ed

That rather lengthy "ode to a Boy Scout" was from the first edition of the Handbook for Boys, copyright 1911. There was an edited, less poetic version published in the revised Handbook for Boys in 1927 - and no my "grey" does not go back that far although at times I may feel that way!

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Grey FOx,

Thanks. I like it. It's just long. I have a Scout who just completed his paperwork for his Eagle. I might use it for that.

 

Ed Mori

Scoutmaster

Troop 1

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