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Gonzo1

Proper campout menus need re-enforcement

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pogy, poagie, pougie, poagy bait....

 

USMC if there was a grunt dictionary....

 

several definitions the best is probably not acceptable to post in this forum...

 

best to say.... its candy and junk that attacts young people of all sorts (but not Grunts)

 

probably derives from the catching of a small fish (poagies) with trash (scraps) and then using the poagie for bait for larger fish or other uses....fries with that?

anarchist

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pogey - money received from the state

porgy - a small bony family of fish prized by certain people for its flavor

 

Our scouts pick their menus which are reviewed for basic requirements two hot meals etc. We are going to let them bring their own grub for wilderness survival campout and have warned them they will be lugging it at least 5 miles. Should be interesting. Same ground rules two hot meals. Will probably have some that will be hungry we did tell them to make sure they had at least 1000 calories.

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Ahhh thanks for the explanation. I think we called it "geedunk" back in the 60's. Or maybe that was the trading post...aka "geedunk stand". Now, our troop calls it "stash". Each scout brings his own supply. The adults bring peanuts (salted in shell only), pub mix, fruit, pistachios, and homemade jerky.

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It was pogie bait in the army. As someone has said, the origin of the term is not fit for this forum.

 

Pogie should not be confused with pogue (ue is silent) - a lazy soldier or a soldier with a cushy job.

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I will have to back up Anarchists post where he mentioned "involved" meals that require extensive prep and cooking/clean-up time. I have seen one instance where our troop had a slot for a "troop shoot" at the camp rifle range after dinner. Well, the dinner was a complicated one and long story short... we ended up sending the boys off to shoot while several volunteered to do clean-up out of the usual duty rotation.

 

We have had good results in having our Scouts guide the menu planning by first considering what events and timetables are on any given outing or campout.

 

We have used the hot-water boil-in the bag omelettes with great sucess when the morning was going to be very busy/involved.

 

The Iron chef style sunday breakfast is one that takes more time , but its done when we can afford to take a little longer.

 

We also stress prior to the event preparation,..ie; fry and drain bacon 2 or 3 days before heading out to an event. Cooking bacon and recovering from the mess it generates when done in a camping environment can be best described as a real hassle and waste of time, and does not appreciably add anything to the experience of cooking in the field. Do the dirty work at home, enjoy the time outside in activity...not degreasing pots,pans and dishes.

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Two years ago our troop took part in our Spring camporee. It can turn cold in Texas in March. One patrol planned nothing but cold food for the entire trip. When we left it was in the upper 70's. Saturday morning it dropped to the 40's. They had nothing hot to eat. We didn't come to their rescue. But guess what. We have camped many many times since then and never again have they planned an entire campout of cold meals.

They also now have backup of ramen just in case.

We do have a troop policy that you can't use ramen as your main meal at camp.

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Our troop has put together a book with various popular meals in it. For each meal, we have a detailed recipe written in "boy language". Pancake recipe states "pour "just add water mix" into bowl and stir in water until it is the consistency of a McD's milkshake". All of the recipes also have a list of ingredients needed and a list of equipment/utensils needed. Having several copies of this book allows the boys to create a menu, grocery list and equipment list in a very short amount of time. They are free to plan something not in the book, or change recipes but this does give them a great starting point. It is especially helpful to the younger ones as they learn campout planning.

 

We have also done as suggested and done preparation before a campout. We meet in a room with an attached kitchen, and have sliced vegetables ahead, browned meat and other things to make on-site cooking simpler. Right now, we are waiting on a schedule for our upcoming district camporee, so that we can plan meals around the scheduled times for events.

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Alright, my son had his first Boy Scout campout this past weekend. Menu in advance for his patrol had cheeseburgers and fries for dinner. the grubmaster buying food asked me how many boys were going. I told him and suggested he buy 2 pounds of hamburger meat and I admit, I suggested he buy Ore Ida type fries, easy to cook and tasty. When he showed up, he had pre-made, pre-shaped burgers from a box and regular, raw potatoes. Hmm, mommy wasn't supposed to change the menu, "she" thought it would be "easier". Hmm, open box, put patty on grill, no measuring, shaping, etc. It was kinda frustrating.

 

 

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Hey Gonzo, I understand where you are coming from on this. But let me suggest to you that "mommy" may not have known why this is frustrating to you (if no one has bothered to explain this to her) and that "daddies" are often just as unclear on what they should and should not do for "junior?" Find out what the SM and ASMs have done to educate the troop parents before you get too frustrated with the parents' lack of understanding. Then figure out whose job it is to explain these things and have that cup of coffee with them sometime.

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OK, "Mommy" lobbied for pre-packaged burgers & raw potatoes - "Daddy" lobbied for pre-packaged fries & raw meat.

 

Your measuring, shaping, etc learning experience happened with the potatoes instead of the burgers. Oh well.

 

Are you upset that "Mommy's" suggestions won out over "Daddy's"?

 

True, once the food was purchased, changes should not have been made. However, neither of you let the boy's do it "their way".

 

 

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Lisa,

I apologize for using the term "mommy".

 

Mom was not on the trip, dad was and wasn't really visable, I think I mentioned some of this in the thread about preventing mischief. This particular dad didn't lift a finger 9except to hoist a coffee cup) all weekend. All mom or dad had to do was follow the list. I haven't come unglued with the committee yet, I'm still trying to figure out who's who in the zoo, i.e. who hangs out with whom, etc.

 

Scoutnut,

I'm not upset at either except that someone meddled. I don't like meddling.

 

I know one thing for sure, the easiest way to cure much of this is to take them backpacking. Check the other thread, you'll see what I mean.

 

For what it's worth, the guy with the RV trailer wouldn't eat my cooking. Someone told me "he" is "the cook" for the adults and wouldn't try my food, it was a yummy jambalaya which left more for the rest of us. So, no soup for you!!

 

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Gonzo1

 

Parents can sure be a pain sometimes...(all of us)!

 

Early in our "experience" with the troop (ages ago) one of my sons was planning Chicken parmesan and a mom overruled real chicken and "made" the young scout buy precooked chicken patties- cause she was sure they would under cook the chicken and didn't want her son getting sick...my young "budding chef" was livid...and soon after the SPL sent out a memo email to all parents...no changing menus...and a scout leader was assigned to shadow that mom on future trips...

 

Experience has taught us that Mommys and and Daddys don't help with the shopping for our new scouts...they are corralled at the store front doors and herded away from the boys...

 

In the interest of educating the new scouts to "patrol shopping"-the new scout patrols are assisted in their shopping by their troop guides ( we try to have at least two guides per NSP so if one guide has a commitment, the second can usually "cover" the NSP patrol) and the NSP Assistant Scout Master...Also, for at least their first three campouts we try to get the WHOLE patrol on each shopping trip- so they can all learn by doing. The NSP Grub Master has the patrol cash and the shopping list and is "in charge" of getting his Mom or Dad to bring the food transport and coolers -but but the boys do the shopping. All purchases are according to the list and menu the patrol worked up and the SPL approved.

 

After a few campouts we "allow" the "grubmaster committee" to drop down to three boys per shopping trip (if they want)... though, in most cases the scouts start actually having fun on these in-store "events" and most boys continue to attend "shopping night" even if they don't have to.

 

YES, for the first few campouts-the shopping takes way too long ( and drives most moms -yes moms- nutz...note here: dads generally can be distracted more easily with a cup of joe...and thusly, are more easily kept out of the way ;>) ...With time and experience, eventually they (the boys and the moms) do learn to do it correctly and after a year or so they can buzz through the store in about a half an hour. REMEMBER- "IF BOY CAN DO IT PARENT DON"T!"

 

now where did I put that pot roast....

Anarchist

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Gonzo, a member of the Hair Club for Men Patrol wouldn't eat your cooking because 'he's the cook'? What kind of example does that guy set for the other patrols? Every patrol needs to follow a duty roster with rotating chores, even the Bi-focal Patrol. (On a side note, is this guy a yankee? We DON'T eat jambalaya. Baked beans or chowder only.)

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Anarchist, thanks for the note,

 

Local, the guy us a red neck. "nuf said ya'll"

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