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NewLdr

Jamboree Patch earned at youth worn as leader

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Yep, the heck with the rules. Rules, tradition, convention . . . none of that matters anymore. Just do whatever you want. Three kids by different fathers and married to none? That's okay. Kids scattered with women all over town? That's okay too.

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You know what GW I thought I was asking a simple question I didnt know your opinion was the final word on the subject. As someone stated earlier there isnt a clear concise explanation of the subject matter. You feel there is. I actually have been attending adult leadership specific training and a trainer was there with a 2001 Jamboree patch last week he told me it was ok as long as I earned it. I have not put it on the uniform it was a question as said you feel it is wrong. Perhaps then you should call the national BSA office and have them make the uniform standards more clear for us that arent as intuitive as yourself.

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"You know what GW I thought I was asking a simple question I didnt know your opinion was the final word on the subject. "

 

Ohhhhh . . . dig.

 

Let's see the answers range from "can't do it" to "what does it matter." Pick whichever makes you happy.

 

" I actually have been attending adult leadership specific training and a trainer was there with a 2001 Jamboree patch last week he told me it was ok as long as I earned it. "

 

After ten years in this organization, I've learned that "trainers" often don't know the answers because they really don't study the subject like the folks here do. When you figure that there are millions of Scouters out there but only a few who are interested enough to actually discuss issues, it is really saddening. It speaks well that you actually sought the information.

 

This isn't just the case in Scouting. I officiated youth sports for two decades and I was always astounded by the number of officials who saw no need to attend meetings to learn about rule changes and also thought that discussion of unusual situations was a waste of time.

 

What does it matter if the player stepped out of bounds? Does it really matter? He dropped the ball but it was because he fell so it shouldn't matter. So what if the rules say a patch shouldn't go there, what does it matter?

(This message has been edited by Gold Winger)

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This is from scouting.org at the following link:

 

http://www.scouting.org/media/insigniaguide/10I.aspx

 

"A jamboree emblem is worn above right pocket by a Boy Scout/Venturer or Scouter who is registered to attend or attended the jamboree as a registered participant or staff member. Both a world and a national jamboree patch may be worn--one current national jamboree patch above the right pocket and one current world jamboree patch on the right pocket. "

 

I am not an attorney but this is vague. The word "one" causes the confusion. If it was clear the word "one" should say "the" that is all I am saying. It seems like it is saying you should wear your most current earned Jamboree patch.

 

Outside of my question it seems if you are a young scout and attend the Jambore in 2010 some seem to infer that boy scout if still a scout should remove his 2010 patch from his uniform after 2013 as that is not "current" and that same scout didn't attend the 2013 Jamboree.

 

 

 

 

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If anyone is going to be the "uniform police" it will be national supply. They require employees to wear an official uniform based upon the ICG. No temporary insiginia, no lodge flaps, just the gold loops, knots entitled to wear, POR patch, WC, and jamboree insignia if applicable. When I worked for national supply in 2000-2002, I was allowed to wear my 1995 WSJ patch on my uniform, despite there being a 1999 WSJ in Thailand.

 

Also I can tell you that there are national level pro who are wear older NSJ patches on their uniforms. When I attended PDL-1, several pros had the 1991 or even older NSJ patches on their field uniform. Saw that on our day trip to camp.

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The world is full of examples where alternative choices may all be correct, or incorrect, or a little of both. We have an entire branch of government devoted to interpreting laws. There is no judicial arm of Scouting. Each member interprets for himself.

 

We use Scouting to prepare boys to make choices. We ought to be able to make choices ourselves too.

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Silly me! I always thought the operative word in the passage from the Insignia Guide was "current".

LongHaul

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But the passage also says "A jamboree emblem is worn above right pocket by a Boy Scout/Venturer or Scouter who is registered to attend or attended the jamboree as a registered participant or staff member."

 

It seems the second statement is causing the problems as it says

"Both a world and a national jamboree patch may be worn--one current national jamboree patch above the right pocket and one current world jamboree patch on the right pocket."

 

If memory serves and please correct me if I am wrong, at one time it was possible to wear both a WSJ and NSJ above the4 right piocket as both patches were smaller than they are today. Overtime both patches got bigger and this second sentence came about. I believe the intent was to disallow the wearing of two jamboree patches at the same time above the pocket, and not to disallow the wearing of older jamboree insignia.

 

Again I had to get approval from the regional director of supply (i beleive that's the title) to wear my 1995 WSJ insignia on the uniform as my boss said I wasn't supposed to wear ANY jamboree insignia on the uniform. She made the call, and got authorization.

 

if you can't trust supply to get it right, who can you trust :)

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I concur with all the opinions that state that an adult can wear a jamboree patch for a jamboree in which the adult participated as a youth. Look at the knots we can wear for youth awards.

 

While I do not have a patch on my shirt, I do have a large patch on the back of my red wool jacket for the 1957 jamboree at Valley Forge.

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We just had a 2010 National Jamboree Planning committee meeting which included all the selected leaders for the first time. What was interesting and neat to see were how many had a jamboree patch on their uniform they had been to. In fact of the three leaders for the troop I will be in, I was the only one that didn't have a jambo patch on. I'm going to probably put the jamboree patch on from 89, the one I attended onto my winter uniform.

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I wear a 1981 from my teen years on one of my shirts and a 2005 with the leader ring. When I was out recruiting for 2010, it certainly gave me a little more credibility in the eyes of Scouts that didn't know me. We talk about walking the walk a lot, I say wear them and lead by example.

 

Jack

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I keep coming back to the bold ('cause it's important) text in the BSA Insignia Guide: "Members should make every effort to keep their uniforms neat and uncluttered." I am always reminding myself of this too, because after every Jamboree, Scouting U, and District / Council event, mine seems to accumulate excess bling. Once the event is over, take it off, sew it on a blanket, or put it in an album. Don't look like a Christmas Tree.

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These threads always give me a chuckle. To see how important they are, print one out and give it to a patrol of Scouts on your next campout. If they use it to light a fire, you have done a good job.

 

Scouting is a game for the boys. Think of Scouting as football. In it's simplest form, boys gather after school and play touch football. They all like to wear a jersey and pretend to be their favorite player. Beyond that, they are happy as can be wearing jeans and whatever sneakers are on their feet. Some of us old guys can remember having so much fun that we were late to dinner. What they now "play" in college and the NFL is more like business. Results are more important than experience.

 

It only seems to be the adults who lose sleep over having a perfect uniform. A uniform is not even required for a boy to be a Scout.Unless you want to have a really broad interpretation of "Scout Spirit", a uniform would not be required to earn Eagle.

 

Yes, I like to see my Scouts in a nice uniform with up to date badges. It's another sign they care about the program. But one of my best Scouts shows up every week in jeans and a uniform shirt that was probably used by several Scouts before him. But as soon as he earned First Class that badge was sewn on.

 

But lose sleep over a darn Jamboree patch? You gotta be kidding. Use the time you spend researching and calling National to find a new place for a hike.

 

IT'S A GAME. Nothing more, nothing less.

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