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Eamonn

How Much Is That Patch Worth?

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I think that people should spent their money how they see fit. Of course they need to take care of their bills and not spend money on anything which isn't legal.

I have been known to waste the odd Pound or the odd Dollar myself.

We however are in an Organization that does have Thrifty as a law.

I am not a patch collector. At events such as the National Jamboree, I do carry a few of my home council patches and most of the time I just give them away. Sure if someone gives me a patch, I'll take it and say "Thank You". I know that it will end up in the box with all the others.

Patches have now become a big business. A business that I am not sure is very Scout-like.

Lodges are now manipulating a patch market.

Our Lodge had a flap made for NOAC,they limited the supply. The guys attending NOAC got so many, the remainder were sold at $12.00 each. Two patch "Collectors" from the Lodge bought the entire amount that were not destroyed. Yes several hundred at $12.00 each.

Now the Jambo is coming and the Lodge is coming up with a two part patch that will cover the entire pocket. This time some will have a gold boarder, these are supposed to be for participants and then there will be patches without the boarder for non-participants.

This isn't patch trading it's making a phony market.

The last time I ordered patches for a Camporee the order wasn't that big (200) and I paid less than $3.00 a patch. The Lodge orders by the thousand. They know that there are a couple of guys who will snap up each and every and especially the last patch, in order to drive the price way up. This can't be Scouting, it can't be what we want to teach our Scouts.

OJ received his second Jamboree patch in the mail, the first thing he did was check on E-bay to see what they were selling for.

After the OA banquet last month, a Lodge officer who is about sixteen informed me that he had spent $160.00 on patches!! If OJ spent $160.00 on patches I would take him someplace for a really good examination!!

I can see how an old or rare patch might be worth something but the way we are using patches to make money is not good, the way we are allowing a few guys with big bucks to drive up the cost is disgraceful.

Is this really teaching Scouts how to be thrifty?

Eamonn.

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Not to mention that whole idea behind trading patches is to promote brotherhood and as a memento of a meeting of fellow Scouts or Scouters.

 

It's not supposed to be a "buy low, sell high" business opportunity. I'm afraid that we've gotten away from the teaching of brotherhood and are, instead, training the next generation of ticket scalpers. (OA pun NOT intended.)

 

The truly sad part is that both Scouts and Scouters are promoting this mercenary approach to patch trading.

- Oren

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I agree with you as a patch collector. You should never sell your patches for any profit. I never buy or sell patches from anyone except my council and then I trade for other councils patches. I dont base anything on financial matters, just if I think the patch is "cool" or one that looks interesting.

 

CTBOYSCOUT101

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Requirement 1.a., American Business Merit Badge:

 

Do the following:

Explain four features of the free enterprise system in United States. Tell its benefits and responsibilities. Describe the difference between freedom and license. Tell how the Scout Oath and Law apply to business and free enterprise.

 

What a country!

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As the spouse of any collector will tell you, "There's a fine line between hobby and mental illness ..."

 

The cool thing about collecting patches is making new friends with Scouts and Scouters all across the country (and world, too). Since I got bitten by the bug a few years ago, I have made dozens of new patch trading buddies. I'm looking forward to meeting many of these guys and gals in person at the Jamboree this summer.

 

Another thing I like is the way everyone can define their own collecting interests, narrow or broad. I personally distain the artificially inflated values of special and commemorative issues, but I know several collectors who relish the hunt for these rarities. I like collecting the patches that are actually worn on uniforms. I've learned a lot about BSA history in the process, too.

 

I don't know of anyone who thinks of patch collecting as a way to make a "profit". But patches do have a value and it takes money to collect them. A buck or two here and there or hundreds (or thousands!), everyone collects at their own level of interest and wherewithal. IMHO, it's a better use of discretionary spending than lottery tickets or a lot of other stuff people buy.

 

Most patch trading is done 1:1, one of mine for one of yours. Folks who are lucky enough to get some "rare" patches often trade their extras (if any) for multiples of other varieties which is how their collection grows. Or they sell them on eBay and plow the proceeds back into their collection. In my experience, Scouts always abide by the 1st point of the Scout Law - I have never been disappointed in trusting a Scout to trade fair.

 

I think everyone should have a hobby. Gardening, military re-enactments, quilting, woodworking, whatever. Hobbies are therapeutic. Patch collecting certainly isn't for everyone. Some people see it as a complete and utter waste of time and money. They are certainly welcome to that view (which may have considerable merit, given the introductory quote above!) But it's fun and it doesn't hurt anyone.

 

(By the way, I have dupe CSPs if anyone wants to trade - just email me!)

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I dont do the patch trading. I will, however, take a few to Jambo to give out and such.

 

The CC of my troop has become quite a good friend of mine since I got into the Jamboree stuff this year. He just bought a patch that is a camporee patch I believe from our district long before our council existed. (Our troop is nearly twice as old as our council). I wanna say he gave something like $240 for it!

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I dont know, the Yoda set that the Marin Council dished out might be worth the $75. the most I ever spent on a patch was probalby $40, but it was worth owning the Hooters set. Bragging rights and humor ahoy. Patch collecting has its sides, I partake in the "I'll trade anything to anyone." Its nice to get your stuff circulated, its great for brotherhood, and if you get a Yoda patch then your collection is set for life. I know guys that dish out thousands for this, the misers will probably just keep it on display or in a box somewhere, living off of money that they conned off of fellow scouts, just let the misers have thier patches.

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I started my collection of Scout books by accident. I crawled into an attic to look at the construction of the roof of a rock house that was being torn down. My first treasure was delivered up from the mice. I began to look around to find more, once outside the attic, and thirty years later, I am still looking. I have completed a couple of series and filled a cabinet with many different types and kinds. I have been into Thrift stores, collectible shops, Ebay, old garages on the side of the road that had boxes of books, etc. When I travel, I take along a flashlight because most of these things are found somewhere in the darkness. I have bought them for a dollar or 50 dollars, depending on the quality, dust jacket, or number of mouse bites. Trading with Scouts is out because few, if any have them. I have traded, bought, sold, given, and received books from dozens of Scouters across the country. I have made friends with some of the most unusual and unique people and Scouters while doing this. Now that I think about it, I owe my collecting bug to a few of the Scout requirements. My first Cub Scout requirement was to fill an egg carton with 12 rocks. I still look for unique rocks and still collect them wherever I go. I no longer put them in an egg carton. For my Boy Scout coin collecting MB, I started with a penny collection. I first found that the dates are sequential and you stop collecting when all of the dates are in the book but then there are the different mints and later I found there are the condition of the coins to consider. I have quite a penny collection to date. I owe all of this to Scouting. It has been one of the most interesting and fulfilling adventures that any guy could have in life that is besides all of the other stuff.

 

Have I encountered people along the way trying to make a living or extra money doing these things, sure! They have their own demons to fight and I hope the best for them. I really have my hands full trying to keep me in line.

 

FB

 

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