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Biggest youth problems

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  • Biggest youth problems

    Hi all, I was recently appointed as the Scouting and Youth Services rep for region in Alpha Phi Omega. I am going to poll the chapter VPs of Service in my region to find out what they have been doing in service to youth, however, I wanted know what you all think is the biggest youth problem is that college students could help alleviate.
    Last edited by FrugalProf; 05-11-2013, 10:53 PM.

  • #2
    The biggest youth problem is obesity. College students could help other youth work towards earning the presidential fitness award and encourage the consumption of vegetables.

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    • #3
      Obesity is a good problem to tackle.

      I'll add another: lack of moral compass.

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      • #4
        Smartphones

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        • #5
          To much electronics, to little outdoor activity. Also, to little face time, and to much facebook.

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          • #6
            Thanks everyone for the suggestions so far. Please keep them coming!

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            • #7
              No doubt obesity is a big problem, but the causes of it are most important. It is not just being lazy, it is the quality of the product our food industry makes available to us. Cow do not eat corn, molasses and grains, they eat grass. Try finding grass feed beef anywhere but at Whole Paycheck. The omega 3 profile of today's beef is vastly different than 40 years ago.

              Teaching people to eat real food and not processed industrial foods is the solution to obesity. Something that college students would have a tough time doing as many of them are fed a steady diet of processed carbs at the dinning hall.

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              • #8
                Respect in its many forms. From respect for authority, elders, each other, one's selt (obesity being in that grouping), etc. The common respect you used to see is gone; simply not there. Some call it old fashioned but looking someone in the eye, using their name, using Mr. or Mrs., shaking hands, etc. Just don't see that anymore....or rarely if ever.

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                • #9
                  I think college age adults could help by teaching youth today to take risks. I read stuff about managing the millennial generation that talks about their group-focus and consensus-management styles. While team building and consensus building have a place, I too often observe group-think instead. I personally believe group-think is the result of risk-aversion and/or fear of the unknown. I'd encourage you to work on that.

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                  • #10
                    Selfishness and immediate gratification. They want it now and are now willing to work for it. They give up easily and are lazy. Their first thought is not "how can I help others" but rather "what's in it for me." Sadly, they are learning this from their parents. I can't tell you how many times parents have said they would do something, then not follow-through because they don't care how it affects others.

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                    • #11
                      Kids today are not expected to actually grow up and be independent until they are well into their twenties.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jblake47 View Post
                        Kids today are not expected to actually grow up and be independent until they are well into their forties.
                        Fixed your post.

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                        • #13
                          You are correct, mine was a typo.

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                          • #14
                            My observation is that kids never challenge authority or the status quo. Ironically, my Scout is far more guilty of the trait than my non-Scouts.

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                            • Nike
                              Nike commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Maybe they're just waiting out authourity.

                          • #15
                            I'm going to suggest something else in addition. And college students need to direct their efforts at themselves as well. I have noticed, over the last 20 years or so, what seems to be not only a tendency of students to feel freer to take shortcuts or cheat, but also for their peers to condone it (I guess the two things go hand-in-hand).

                            Now, I'm not sure what students can do to address this other than to think hard about their own ethical judgment, but one thing they could do for everyone else is to take a serious look and see if there really is a problem or not. And if there is, does it result from greater technical ability (smart phones, etc.) or do new social activities influence the way they view morality (being able to vote multiple times for American Idol, for example, if you're willing to pay)?

                            This is less 'substantial' than attacking obesity, and I think that is a great idea as well. But this is, I think, more intellectually-challenging, and if they can accomplish no more than to cause everyone to think more seriously about it, it will have been a positive contribution.

                            IMHO

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                            • Khaliela
                              Khaliela commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I teach at a local University and see a lot of this. The problem seems to be that the kids don't realize they are cheating. If they are paying someone else to do their HW or take their test for them, they see that as effective management of resources. If you catch them and give them an F you get a call from their parents (Yes, I'm still talking about college students here) saying that clearly the child has "Management Potential" and as the instructor I'm not seeing the "big picture," because managers don't actually do the work of peons, they hire peons to do the work of peons!
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