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What's your favorite piece of gear you have in your kit?

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  • #16
    I was looking at Making my own Custom Camp Trailer with a Solar system on it to run CPAP and a Nice comfy bed to sleep in due to bad back. My Council will not allow Trailers or RVs at Camp..their excuse someone may illegally dump waste. I just want a portable easy system nothing Fancy. I was Told that If You use a CPAP even a Battery operated one your not allowed in Backcountry at any BSA High Adventure any more. Does anyone Know if this is true?

    Comment


    • King Ding Dong
      King Ding Dong commented
      Editing a comment
      For that to work everyone needs to drink the Flavor Aid., . "Ok all I am going to take my drugs now so I can sleep, you all have fun listening to me saw all night".

      I have been known to fall asleep without it occasionally, but most times it is a no go. If I do pass out the wife makes sure I put my "#%£\**+] mask on!"
      Last edited by King Ding Dong; 10-01-2013, 02:33 PM. Reason: Changed Kool Aid to Flavor Aid per duckfoot the macabre historian. :)

    • duckfoot
      duckfoot commented
      Editing a comment
      Flavor Aid....it was Flavor Aid...

    • boomerscout
      boomerscout commented
      Editing a comment
      Have you tried a Mandibular Advancement Device (MAD)? Does what a CPAP does - prevent snoring - but is not powered. It works by keeping the jaw forward and may prevent the tongue from moving. See your dentist.

  • #17
    Was it a Truck Tent? I have looked into an Actual tent that is designed to bet put up in a Truck Bed. Did yall try and Explain why? Was there Electricity available at Sites. When Possible I would Pay the extra Cost myself for electricity just for CPAP.

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    • King Ding Dong
      King Ding Dong commented
      Editing a comment
      The scout just set up a regular tent in the bed of a truck. I have no idea why, I guess he is anti social, spoiled, or just couldn't be bothered with hanging around the other kids. No there was no electricity at the sites but I have my big marine battery so I was fine.

  • #18
    Hmmm. Should have said my Hennessy Hammock. Everytime I take it down in under 3 minutes with no drying needed I remember why I love it.

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    • #19
      Spent some time thinking about this thread and all ... and totally forgot the most basic thing:
      always carry a spoon (any Infantry Grunt will tell ya that one) and never forget your towel ;-)

      Comment


      • #20
        Originally posted by berliner View Post
        Spent some time thinking about this thread and all ... and totally forgot the most basic thing:
        always carry a spoon (any Infantry Grunt will tell ya that one) and never forget your towel ;-)
        P38.. You Can use the Lid from The Can for a Spoon..Can't Open a Can with a Spoon as Easily

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        • duckfoot
          duckfoot commented
          Editing a comment
          The field uniform has a nice spoon holder in the left pocket. Scouts asks why I have a spoon there. Answer is : you can always use a spoon.

        • SSScout
          SSScout commented
          Editing a comment
          Y'all forgot the guru's advice? "When you get to the fork in the road, take it" = Yogi Berra....

          I always have a fork with me, In the pocket. Elicits conversation. And smiles.

        • King Ding Dong
          King Ding Dong commented
          Editing a comment
          Fork hmmmm. Some people carry a sausage.

      • #21
        I've two....my Nashwaak otter tail canoe paddle (one piece cherry), and the Garman Dakota 20 GPS......

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        • #22
          Eureka tent is the first thing that pops to mind. 15 years of about once a month, including plenty of heavy rain and several snowstorms, never been wet. I have had 4 Eurekas 2 Keltys and one Coleman. (embarrassing) and the worst that happened in a Eureka was a pack of gum in the corner of the tent got wet. My fault anyway because I had put on the fly wrong, leaving a little gap of unprotection. I also love my Eureka 15 deg bag... it has a nice high footbox so that even if your zipper is down your legs and feet are still buried pretty good, and is longer and fluffier on one side for a good pillow or over the head cover.

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          • #23
            For years (through Cubs, and hiking on our own), I used what could best be described as "book bags" for day hiking. One by LLBean, one by Jansport. Those weren't comfortable day packs at all, and didn't carry loads well.

            So I splurged and bought a much higher-quality daypack. In particular, I got one of the larger Camelbak daypacks. Very comfortable, can carry larger loads. Not so inexpensive, but I'm awfully glad I got it. Day hiking has been much more comfortable ever since.

            Comment


            • duckfoot
              duckfoot commented
              Editing a comment
              Which bag? I love my Camelback MULE but I would upgrade to one that could fit a binder for those weeks at camp if it wasn't too big. if the price point was right. This is the time of year for outdoor clearance sales so you have to keep your eyes peeled...

          • #24
            Yucca pack, goes on most every trip.

            Stosh

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            • King Ding Dong
              King Ding Dong commented
              Editing a comment
              I think you have mentioned that before, I had to look it up. .

              Why ? What I saw was a canvas pack with unpadded WB strapping. Cost looked good though.

            • jblake47
              jblake47 commented
              Editing a comment
              I have three of them, even the one I had as a scout in the 1960's. I even used it as a book bag throughout college.
              Why? It holds very comfortably everything one would need for a weekend outing. With plastic bag packed items, it is virtually indestructible. The last time I used it was on my vacation last month. It holds 9 days of change of clothes easily. The outer loops allow for a blanket bedroll as well. If the unpadded straps and lack of waist belt bothers you, a tump line thru the flap makes it an easy carry because it does to get overloaded on occasion. And as far as durability goes? the canvas wears like iron. I don't know how many times I have worn out nylon packs over the years, but they come and go, but the Yuccas are still there on the shelf, kinda like an old friend you can count on.

              On an extensive trek, I take two and like duffles wear one on my back and another on the front to distribute weight. Neither are as large as duffles, combined probably carry as much as one duffle, but the weight is distributed front and back. No frame makes it easy to simply drop in the bottom of the canoe, run a rope through the straps and off you go. If you don't have a piece of rope, just unclip the strap, wrap a thwart and reclip. Couldn't be easier.

              Stosh
              Last edited by jblake47; 10-16-2013, 07:13 AM.

            • desertrat77
              desertrat77 commented
              Editing a comment
              Yucca packs rock! My original from the '70s is long gone, but I have a couple others that I use regularly. Simple and tough.

          • #25
            I always grab my Buck knife and Leatherman. After that it depends on the trip.

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            • #26
              Backpacking chair. I hate sitting on wet muddy ground and the chair also has enough support to lean back.

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              • #27
                My pocketknife. A stockman style, honed to perfection.

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                • #28
                  My Buck 110 folder. It was a 16th birthday present and I have used it ever since. Sure, there are more lightweight knives, but my Buck seems to find it's way onto my belt every time I head to the woods.

                  I have only used it once, but a close second would be my hammock.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    I'd have to say my homemade hammock. It makes hot nights (above 70) bearable in terms of temperature, and is much easier on my back than the ground.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Hey Duckfoot -- I haven't been on the forum as much as I used to -- the Camelbak I bought was the Alpine Explorer model, which I recall was around $85, full-price, at the time.

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