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Webelos to Scouts Transition

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17 hours ago, RememberSchiff said:

IMO, also add Each scout packs his own gear and whatever gear his patrol assigns. Each scout is responsible for that gear, specifically cleaning and drying himself. He should setup a clothes line at home (he knows the knots and has rope) and learn how to use the washer and dryer. Learning  to sew would also be great.

Should parents talk to the SPL or the SM first? 

My $0.02

On a campout, if its directly related to the Scouts, the SPL.  Otherwise, the SM.  My view is the SPL is the top of the organization chart. 

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I think it takes a lot of patience with new parents, and figure that new parents just don't know what they don't know.

I had a very frustrating first year or so in my own family when my oldest was starting Scouts.  It went something like this.  I'd ask a question -- I have lots of questions, and my husband, an ASM, would get mad at me for asking the question.  This is exactly what it felt like from my point of view.  From his point of view, he was trying to tell me that Boy Scouts was different, but he came across as the grouchiest person on earth, where I couldn't even talk about Boy Scouts!!  It was terrible!   In my own house!!  I learned a lot more here than I did talking to my spouse, but he is not a guy who has much patience for explaining stuff. 

Somehow we got through it, but it takes a patient person to stop and tell an inexperienced new parent how things work.  And I was not asking things maliciously, I just wanted to know what the deal was with Boy Scouts.  It takes awhile for new parents to understand the system. 

 

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5 hours ago, WisconsinMomma said:

I think it takes a lot of patience with new parents, and figure that new parents just don't know what they don't know.

I had a very frustrating first year or so in my own family when my oldest was starting Scouts.  It went something like this.  I'd ask a question -- I have lots of questions, and my husband, an ASM, would get mad at me for asking the question.  This is exactly what it felt like from my point of view.  From his point of view, he was trying to tell me that Boy Scouts was different, but he came across as the grouchiest person on earth, where I couldn't even talk about Boy Scouts!!  It was terrible!   In my own house!!  I learned a lot more here than I did talking to my spouse, but he is not a guy who has much patience for explaining stuff. 

Somehow we got through it, but it takes a patient person to stop and tell an inexperienced new parent how things work.  And I was not asking things maliciously, I just wanted to know what the deal was with Boy Scouts.  It takes awhile for new parents to understand the system. 

 

I fondly use the phrase "Cruise Director".  I've always felt that 50% of my job as a Scouter is to explain things to parents.  Part of providing the programming for a youth activity is to help the parents understand why we do what we do and how to best reinforce it.  I see working with new parents and leaders as a big part of that.  Their scout is going to have a less fulfilling time in Scouting if the parents don't really understand why we're doing things the way we do. 

Having a bunch of parents running around doing the wrong things creates chaos too.  That's where a key part of running a youth activity to getting the parents properly aligned to support it.

I think that's why we have fewer problems with helicopter parents than some troops.  Since we've been explaining why for so long many people now internalize it and it's generally part of our culture.  So, more and more parents can help with explaining why to others.  In fact, we've gone further with the concept and now one of our Committee Members have been holding parent info sessions at meetings to explain things to newer parents.  It's working out really, really well.

8 hours ago, perdidochas said:

On a campout, if its directly related to the Scouts, the SPL.  Otherwise, the SM.  My view is the SPL is the top of the organization chart. 

I'd kinda disagree here.  If a parent wanted to do something at a troop meeting, camping trip, whatever, then I'd have the parent start by talking with the SM.  The SM could then say something like "ok, gotchca, that's probably not what you want to do - here's why." Or, perhaps he could say "hey, that makes sense.  You should check with the SPL to see if he can fit it into his plans."  

The SM, as an adult, is in a good position to act as a coach to the parent and filter for the SPL.

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