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rjscout

Archery MB

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We have recurve bows of various sizes and some Genesis Original bows at camp.  Some of the boys like the idea of shooting the Genesis compound.   The Archery MB requirements state that a scout using a Compound must shoot 3 ends at 10 yards and 3 ends at 15 yards as one of the shooting options. I have had scout who want to use the Genesis and average close to 30 pts at 10 yards, but averages only 12 pts at 15 yards, missing the needed score minimum of 150 pts.

 

Does the compound bow requirement cover the universal compound Genesis, since there is not real advantage of the let-off of the draw weight?  To me, it would seem that the two distances would be meant for a TRUE compound bow that does have a let-off weight at full draw, giving an advantage.  I have heard of summer camps that use the Genesis bow without having multiple shooting distances for the Archery MB.

 

Just wanted to get a feel for what other Archery MB Counselors are doing.

 

RJ

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You might want to check some National Field Archery Association clubs to see how they handle this. It's hard to say how a particular bow should be classified unless you see how it performs in hundreds of hands. NFAA clubs may have some experts who can give you a more technical opinion.

 

My gut is to advise the kid to not use a bow that isn't serving him well.

 

It's not just the let-off that's hurting the boy. It's the stability of his forearm, the appropriateness of his stance, the sense of arc, the variation in shafts and fletchings, the placement of the range with respect to prevailing winds, and how his eyes focus. Sometimes a bow that feels good on the draw screws up an archer's ability to adjust for everything else. Your time might be better spent helping him perfect his use of one of your stock recurves, or -- if you can find a volunteer to loan one -- a small longbow.

Edited by qwazse

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Our camp targets are fixed at 10 yds. Most scouts do requirement f.1 of either recurve or compound option, though some are already accomplished JOAD archers so they need not shoot at camp.

 

Success is more a function of the arrow quality than draw weight.

Edited by RememberSchiff

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The basic Genesis compound bow should work just fine for him at 10 and 15 yards. If he's not scoring he needs to work on stance, positioning, aim, release, etc. He will get there, it just takes work.

 

My own Scout has his own Genesis bow and shoots often. It took him a few months to dial in at 15 yards to consistently score. You've got several scoring methods depending on which you want to use. We always counsel our guys that Archery is one of the most difficult to earn because your scoring at 15 yards takes patience and practice.

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One has to be flexible with this type of MB.  I once saw a counselor working with the boys using long bows.  (Yeah, many moons ago.)  One of the boys was having difficulty scoring at both 10 and 15 and asked if he could use his own bow.  After struggling for another 1/2 hour the boy asked again.  The MB counselor relented and "allowed" him to use his own bow.  The boy immediately shot a perfect score at both 10 and 15.  This was in the days before compounds.  MB counselor was used to long bows and the boy had one of the new recurves.

 

Do what it takes to help the boys be successful.   

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There's a big difference in technique especially the release.  Once elevation is established for the poundage, the release become vital for the right/left dynamic. 

 

One of the reasons long bows are more difficult is that they are such low poundage, the arc is so much more sever than the higher poundage of the recurve and even then the compounds.  The higher pounds will more severely affect the arrow coming off the bow as well.

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With the Genesis bows, if they are having more trouble at the longer distances, you might need to increase pull force to increase arrow velocity.  A few turns with an Allen wrench on the bow arms can help significantly.  One of our camps had the Genesis bows real loose for the Cubs  at the shorter distances and the Venturing kids were struggling until I "turned up the power" 

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Thanks for replies.  The scouts who tried Genesis did not have enough practice at 15 yards to be consistent, even after scoring well (~30) at 10 yards.  More practice at 15 yds is the key.  They just freaked out when they switched to 15.  I was just wondering on the intent of the two distances since the Genesis is not a huge advantage over a decent recurve.  A true Compound with a let-off would be a different story.  

 

RJ

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Thanks for replies.  The scouts who tried Genesis did not have enough practice at 15 yards to be consistent, even after scoring well (~30) at 10 yards.  More practice at 15 yds is the key.  They just freaked out when they switched to 15.  I was just wondering on the intent of the two distances since the Genesis is not a huge advantage over a decent recurve.  A true Compound with a let-off would be a different story.  

 

RJ

Yep. Practice.

I couldn't aim a rifle for diddly, not much better at archery, but I was gonna make for sure that I could handle any bow that I picked up.

 

I remember coming home, pulling my brothers 20# wooden re-curve from the rafters, sifting through the arrows, adjusting the bowstring I made at camp (which meant building my own jig), and setting up a target (thanks to Dad for the hay bales and poster) at 18 yards ... just so I knew I'd be good at shorter distances. One less model plane being built, and I had a plan for my weekends and evenings. On warm days, my 100 year old grandpa would come out to smoke his stogie and we'd set up a chair so he could watch me shoot. Got the badge the following summer.

 

As to BSA's intent on the distances, I don't think the minutes of how the requirements were made are anywhere to be found. They certainly didn't have any particular brand in mind. So, the best you could do is tell the boys taking the badge what other scouts have experienced with your collection of bows, and suggest they start practicing at 15 yards. That may mean you have to move one or two more targets back to accommodate the extra time needed at that distance.

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