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Greyfox

Patches on Adult Uniforms

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I love the uniform stuff. This is an interesting thread. Let me preface by saying that I have no problem with anything mentioned so far in this thread.

 

The pickle Eamonn wears is interesting. I've seen those before and may have even had one on the collar of my red jacket at some point in time. I don't remember what it stood for, either. It's not official, but it's just a pickle, after all!

 

Maybe it's Freudian. I've lost my pickle and can't remember what it was for! LOL!

 

At one time, I had nine uniforms (they were much more comfortable than a coat and tie and that's what the Scout Executive demanded that we wear if we weren't in field uniform.) 6 uniforms were the poly-wool. 3 were 100% cotton. Yes, OGE, they softened, but I have been doing my own ironing and sewing since I was 8 years old.

 

Having so many uniforms led me to a few rules of my own. For everyone, if you've earned it and it doesn't violate printed uniform guidelines (which don't cover pickles from what I've studied) you can wear it. Nothing says you have to wear it.

 

I know many volunteers and professionals who have "general's uniforms" as Bob White said. I think it's great to have a uniform that impresses folks as well as gets the boys to ask questions. I have a general's uniform as well. I've been known to wear it when I'm about to go into a hostile situation where someone or someones far older than myself and with longer Scouting tenure want to tell the professional that he doesn't know what he's talking about. It's a poly-wool uniform with everything I'm still entitled (as an adult) to wear. It doesn't see much use. I've learned over the years that I rarely need such a tactic. But it does include the "Darth Vader" knot (reserved for professionals.)

 

My "everyday" uniforms have no more than three knots on them. I have five, but like to keep people guessing. They include a combination of, but not all of, the eagle knot, the James E. West Fellowship (a gift from my wife for our 5th anniversary) the Arrow of Light, the Scoutmaster's Key, the Professional Fellowship ... but only three at a time.

 

The other patches on all my uniforms include the position patch -- Council Executive Staff -- Council Strip, American flag, World Fellowship patch, and, in a couple of cases the 1997 Jamboree patch -- more because it's removal scars the poly-wool fabric and, besides, as far as I'm concerned it covers an old wound. I was the logistics coordinator for Action Center B at the 1997 Jamboree and got "shot up" pretty good. I tried very hard for a bad evaluation, but they wouldn't give it to me. Had to fend off the "hand of God" to not have to go back in 2001, but that's a different story.

 

A couple of my uniforms have the lodge flap on them, but not all. I sew recreationally, but just don't like the position of that particular patch. I don't wear a temporary patch because I don't want to show favoritism to any particular district or council activity and don't feel like changing them all the time.

 

I wear my Wood Badge Beads frequently. Not always, but frequently. They're not all my beads. The first two beads were the two that were originally awarded to my father (he's still alive . . . relax) and the third bead was awarded for the first time I staffed the course.

 

Of course, I've always lived in the upper mid-west and am a small guy. So most of the time, it doesn't matter what's on my uniform to anyone but me. I've got three of the fatigue-style sweaters that came out in the late '80's and early 90's. In the upper mid-west it's usually either chilly, cold, freezing cold, or chilly again. I usually have the sweater on. Sometimes I let my beads hang out.

 

My red jacket is my third red jacket. It's lost it's pickle, and is now completely unadorned.

 

For myself, which is different than IMHO (I should tell you that it took me until last week to figure out what that means,) I prefer the minimalist look. Or semi-minimalist. I think it's great for trainers and commissioners to wear all that they're entitlted to wear. It may inspire someone to emulate them. For me, as a professional, it may inspire me to tell me something they wouldn't tell the Assistant Scout Executive, but that IS something I need to know.

 

DS

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It's good to know that I'm not the only one with the so-called "General's Uniform".

 

My latest uniform has everything that I'm allowed to wear on it. I have 1 row of knots, 2 service stars--one for youth and the other for adult leadership. On my right side above the pocket is my XV World Jamboree Patch, I still have the purple name plate from that jamboree also. On the right pocket flap is the OA Lodge patch and ribbon. On the temporary pocket, I have the U.S. contingent patch to the XV WJ. On another uniform I have the National Camp School patch on the temporary pocket.

 

I have 7 uniforms, 6 short sleeve and 1 long sleeve. Most are similar with the left shoulder sleeve having the same CSP and troop # 26 with the exception of the position patch which maybe Scoutmaster, Crew Advisor, or Cubmaster. I only have one venturing shirt adorned with all patches. I have one shirt that I call semi-sterile with only the left sleeve patches on it. No patches on the front. This is my campfire shirt. I do have the official shorts and pants,and campaign hat.

 

I, too, enjoy wearing the uniforms at different events. The look on Scouters, Scouts, and Venturers faces when they ask "How'd you get that?" or "I didn't know we can earn that?" or "Adults get awards too. . ."

 

Yes, I do wash, sew, and iron my own uniforms.

 

It's all in the FUN.

 

Matua(This message has been edited by matuawarrior)

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Thanks for all the response, guys. I especially like the franernaty of sewing impaired souls. I once made the mistake of tilting my head while my wife was sewing on a patch at about a 45 degree angle. Her response would have me immediately removed from this forum for life. Needless to say I have been doing all my own sewing for many years now - practice really does help but nothing is more painfull than the rear end of a needle buried three inches beneath a thumbnail.

 

I must say I like my Smokey Bear hat but it had to get pretty beat up before it became comfortable.

 

When I was courting LOL meant lots of love, I assume it has a little different meaning here?

 

Thanks again.

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Greyfox,

Lots of luck figuring that one out! Although I've done my own ironing & sewing for years I should drop My Loving Wife a note w/ the word Love spelled out. Sorry, that could be a grey area!

 

Does anyone remember the name of the recent thread on the abbreviations (wrong word but you know what I mean...)

Bob

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I used to think that LOL means lots of love. It made a whole lot more sense when I finally found out that in today's world of email, it means "Laugh Out Loud."

 

 

I'm glad I finally figured out what IMO and IMHO are. Until the light came on yesterday, I thought it was a ROAC (Random Act Of Capitalization.) I just made that one up.

 

DS

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LOL (laughing out loud) is a TLA (three letter acronym)

 

IMHO (in my humble opinion) is a ETLA (extended three letter acronym)

 

IDCFS (Illinois department of children and family services)is an EETLA (expanded extended three letter acronym)

 

ROFLOL (Rolling on floor laughing out loud) is an MEETLA (modified expanded extented three letter acronym)

 

Bob White(This message has been edited by Bob White)

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I had a Scout, this weekend ask me if I had to learn English, or if I had always had an accent.

As some of my posting show, Spelling is not my great strength.

Spelling in American English, without all the extra vowels, takes some getting used too.

Last night I disclosed to the world that, I suffer from being sewing impaired, today I find out that I'm also AEAI.(American English Acronym Impaired)

I will have to watch out for the MIWC (Men In White Coats.)

If one of them is named Robert, does this make him a Bob White ?

If the coat has braces, do I become a man of Steele ?

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OMG! (Oh MY God):

 

I believe I've started something terrible that can't be stopped. Levity!

 

What if Steele stands for STEELE -- (Stupidely Terrifying Eagerly Eccentric Leader Employee?)

 

The D still stands for Dave.

 

DS

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Before I head off to my training committee meeting tonight, let me say that I hope people will forget the anacronym above.

 

I'm reminded of a story (big surprise.)

 

I once made the mistake of telling a Wood Badge patrol during lunch at their site that I was born in 1965 and was lucky I wasn't "Moon-puppy." The patrol never forgot it and neither did the staff.

 

I was Moon-puppy for the rest of the week!

 

Before you smart-alecs start calling me Moonpuppy, let me point out that I take ribbing about as well as any man . . . and that ain't saying much.

 

DS

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If any of us refer to you in the future as MP you should, of course, assume that means Magnificent Personality, not the Other, ahem, unmentionable appelation.

 

Eamonn, do ya'll really wear your braces on your coat in JOE (Jollye Olde Englande)? We usually wear them on our pants or our teeth, depending, generally, on age and girth dimensions.

 

This is more fun than cooking Hobo hamburgers with that fancy new nostick new tinfoil my wife got me that is preperforated with GBH(great big holes)! Whoops!

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MP, eh? Let's not go there.

 

Speaking of English as a second language, Eamonn, next time we talk, remind me to tell you the story of the confusion an Englishman and I had when we were talking about our leader in Peru getting "pissed."

 

It means something completely different in English than it does in American.

 

Abbott and Costello were kidding. Robert (my young English friend from long ago who is different than my friend Eamonn) and I truly didn't know what the other was talking about.

 

Care to supply some definitions, Eamonn?

 

DS

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I wear my eagle knot as well as my religious knot and Arrow of Light. Since my budget will not allow more, I only have one shirt.

I attended a Eagle court of honor and wore my Eagle medal pinned under the knot.

Someone told me that I could not do that, it either one or the other. Since no sane person would wear a medal everyday, the knot is the reasonable choice. However, for a special time like that of a Eagle Court of Honor it seams proper to wear the medal. What does not seam reasonable is to take the knot off to wear the medal or not to wear the knot at all for those few times when you would wear the medal. Thanks for the space.

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Go ahead and wear your Eagle Award along with your knot for special occassions Captainron, you are not violating any uniform regulation.

 

Congrats on being an Eagle Scout.

 

BW

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Interesting comment on the temporary patch. I too, got tired of changing them...solved the problem by just sewing the International Activity Patch on the pocket and leaving it there. We've earned the thing three times over through combined camporees with BSK Scouts. It's classy-looking, and balances the uniform nicely.

 

KS

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