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First aid kit

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The kit doesn't way that much. It's a bit heavy but at camporees and OA events I tend to be the one in charge of first aid. I have a different one for backpacking.

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Wow.

I now feel utterly inadequate.

Did anyone mention a mirror ?

Not very high tech - but useful.

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If anyone thinks of anything i missed in mine (on the first page) let me know. I'm curious to get someones opinion as to wether i have too much, not enough, etc...

 

-Jeff Huggins

SPL/ First Aider

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Jeff,

The real deal is to have something generalized enough for most small things, or tailored for a particular trip...and carry it around.

 

The second thing is to take some Red Cross courses, the best one being Wilderness First Aid, (or if you have time, Wilderness First Responder). The knowledge is what will stand you in better stead than a complete kit.

 

JB

 

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Some years back when I was in "Cubbing" We had the Cub Scouts, make a small first aid kit, in the canister that a 35mm Film comes in, two small holes and a curtain ring, allowed it to be used as a woggle.

Nothing very high tech, in it : A couple of band aids, a quarter (Make that two now) A safety pin.

Paper with the Boys name and phone number, along with the leaders phone number.

The Cub Scouts thought it was cool.

It came from a book, but I can't remember which one. Maybe someone else can help with my poor memory.

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No matter the cool memories, what counts is the ability of a boy to help when the time comes. Nothing is more killing to the soul than to be found wanting when an emergency occurs and when you could have done something...and you didn't know how.

 

TEACH!

 

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I've taken the CPR fot the professional rescuer, and First Aid. Has anyone been able to find an ARC chapter who teaches a when help is delayed course of equivelant.

 

-Jeff Huggins

SPL/First Aider

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These are some good basic city type courses. These aren't what you want for wilderness situations but are good for weekend campouts where your close enough o an ambulance/FD. If you are looking for a wilderness course try

 

http://www.redcross.org/

 

http://www.americanheart.org/

 

If you have any ?'s e-mail me at Doughnuts64@yahoo.com

 

-Jeff Huggins

SPL/First Aider

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Jeff, the only things I think you might have missed is a whistle and duct tape.

 

I know, duct tape? As a past medic with the 101st one of the items we were told to have just in case was duct tape. Works to protect blisters if needed, can hold wounds closed if needed and tends to less affected by enviromental conditions that will defeat most bandaids. Doesn't take much and can also be used to mark trails, danger areas and many other similar uses. One of those things that if you don't have you will probably need. Also much cheaper to use in quantity than medical tapes.

 

yis

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johnmbowen:

You are so right when you say teach.

We try very hard to do so using Age Approriate activities.

Cub Scouts need to think what they are doing is cool, and this in time and age can be moved on to the next step.

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I'm sorry i forgot everything in the outside of my kit. I also carry a whistle, a knife, a multi-tool, orange caution tape and of course duct take(on the end of one of the buckles.

 

-Jeff

SPL/First Aider

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Nobody has mentioned Universal Precautions for Blood Borne Pathogens. I know it's hard to believe, but there are HIV positive children (including scouts) walking among us, who may have contracted the disease by blood transfusion, or through birth by an infected mother, and may appear perfectly healthy. In fact, they themselves may not be aware of their HIV status. Such was the case with a Kindergartener in the school where my wife is the school nurse. Her motto is, "if it's wet and it's not yours, DON'T TOUCH IT!!!" One should always assume that the body fluids they are touching are infective. There is currently no law that requires disclosure of the HIV status and they are free to attend school and scout camp just like any other child.

 

According to the G2SS:

 

Because of the possibility of exposure to communicable diseases, first-aid kits should include latex or vinyl gloves, plastic goggles or other eye protection, and antiseptic to be used when giving first aid to bleeding victims, as protection against possible exposure. Mouth barrier devices should be available for use with CPR.

 

Protection Considerations for Bloodborne Pathogens

Many people are concerned about the rapid spread of HIV (the AIDS virus) and try to avoid exposing themselves to this hazard. Health professionals and amateur first-aiders like those of us in Scouting may find ourselves faced with special concerns in this regard. Therefore, we must know how to act and how to instruct the youth we lead. Try to maintain the BSA's tradition of rendering first aid to those in need. Recognize that often the victims we treat with first aid are friends and family members whose health we are familiar with. Therefore, in such cases, except when we know they have infectious diseases, we should not hesitate to treat them.

 

The Boy Scouts of America Recommends

 

Treat all blood as if it were contaminated with bloodborne viruses. Do not use bare hands to stop bleeding; always use a protective barrier. Always wash exposed skin area with hot water and soap immediately after treating the victim. The following equipment is to be included in all first-aid kits and used when rendering first aid to those in need:

 

Latex or vinyl gloves, to be used when stopping bleeding or dressing wounds

A mouth-barrier device for rendering rescue breathing or CPR

Plastic goggles or other eye protection to prevent a victim's blood from getting into the rescuer's eyes in the event of serious arterial bleeding

Antiseptic, for sterilizing or cleaning exposed skin area, particularly if there is no soap or water available.

Individuals (medicine, fire rescue, and law enforcement Venturing crew members; volunteer first-aiders at camporees, Scouting shows, and similar events) who might have been exposed to another's blood and body fluids should know the following:

The chartered organization and its leaders should always explain and make clear the possible degree of exposure to blood or body fluids as a result of Scouting activities.

As a precaution, adult volunteers or youth members should consider a hepatitis B vaccination. The cost of the shots will not be borne by BSA, nor is the chartered organization required to underwrite the cost.

The chartered organization may arrange to have shots given at a reduced rate or free of charge.

If vaccination is recommended, any adult volunteers and youth members who decline the shots, either at full cost to them or at a reduced rate, or free, should sign a refusal waiver that should be retained by the council for five years.

 

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Does anyone have any recommendations on the store bought kits? I'd much prefer to assemble my own, but by the time I buy the travel bag and all the supplies (for say - 3 day backpacking trip) - I'm probably looking at a bill of at least $50 (although I keep telling myself one I create myself will be cheaper.)

 

Are the ones in campmor, rei, or even Sportsmans Guide ( http://www.sportsmansguide.com/search/search.asp?c=83&k=first+aid )that usefull? Does anyone ever carry triangular bandages around in a kit (like we teach w/ the scout neckerchief)?

 

Thanks,

 

Chris Gagliano

SM - T 61

Washington, D.C.

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Mr. Gagliano,

If your looking for a good, cheap small kit I suggest you check out www.galls.com They have a navy blue fold open back for $16. You can'r beat it. And yes, I carry triangular bandages with me. The scout neckerchiefs are not very absorbant and so they don't work as well, not to mention i don't backpack my class A uniform. If you have any questions feel free to e-mail me.

 

YIS,

 

-Jeffrey

SPL/Firstaider

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