Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Speedy's DAD

Adult leader uniform and Wood Badge

Recommended Posts

I will be attending Wood Badge starting this weekend, and I am trying to make sure my uniform is correct and will pass inspection.

 

I was looking at the Adult Leader Uniform Inspection Sheet and on the right sleeve the Quality Unit Award is shown at 4 inches from the shoulder seam to the bottom of the QU Patch. It does not show location or space for a Wood Badge Patrol emblem patch. On the Boy Scout Uniform Inspection Sheet it shows the Patrol Patch and the QU Patch is 4 inches from the shoulder seam to the top of the patch. In the notes on both sheets it does not say specifically 4 inches to the top or to the bottom, it just shows the 4 inch measurement in the diagram. Is it supposed to be 4 inches to the top or to the bottom, or does it matter?

 

Of course at this time I don't have a Wood Badge patrol patch (since i have not started the course yet). So the first question is, is the Wood Badge Patrol Patch approved for the Adult uniform? And the second question is, should I place the QU patch at 4 inches to the bottom and then have to move it when I get a Wood Badge Patrol patch to make room for the WB Patrol patch, or can I leave room for the WB Patrol patch and place the QU patch at 4 inches to the top and leave that space empty? And if I leave the space is 4 inches to the top enough room for proper placement of the patch?

 

I checked the online version of the Insignia Guide at the BSA website and they have Wood Badge listed in the index but no link to any info on the patch.

 

I just want to make sure I (and my patrol, whoever they may be) don't get dinged for not having it in the right place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short answer: wear the correct uniform for your home unit.

 

It's been a couple years since I was on WB staff so this may have been tweaked a bit, but here's the philosophy:

 

You should wear your normal uniform with correct insignia for your home unit. That you're trying to make sure everything is proper is great.

 

During the course, you will be play a role. You begin the course as a Cub Scout. You cross over and become a member of a patrol in Troop 1. You will serve in various positions in your patrol. The staff members play roles, too, as Troop Guides, ASMs, Scoutmaster, etc. As part of that role playing you will be given the insignia for those roles -- a troop 1 neckerchief, patrol patches, position patches, etc. Those should be worn only during the course. Most folks just pin the patches on (especially the positions patches since they change every day) but we had on patrol that took the time to sew the patches on every day (of couse only a couple stitches per patch).

 

There are a lot of folks who will wear their WB patrol patch permanently. Technically, that's not proper. But then neither are the Old Goat and Old Fart adult patrol patches some troops wear. And many if not most folks like wearing their plaid, Troop 1 neckerchief outside the course. As it was explained by our course director, that's not technically correct either. But folks are rightfully proud of their WB experience and wearing the neckers does a lot to promote the course, so what the heck. I'm certainly not going to say anything to anyone about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, wear the uniform that is appropriate for your currently registered Scouting positions(s). When you are given a patrol patch, it will hopefully come with a safety pin. Since your Wood Badge patrol patch is temporary, pinning it on your uniform should be more than adequate. Of course, your Wood Badge Course Director may have other ideas, which you should follow.

 

Your MacLaren tartan Troop 1 neckerchief IS an official part of the uniform. Participants should be encouraged to wear their tartan neckerchief, in the same manner that Wood Badgers who have completed their ticket are encouraged to wear their Wood Badge neckerchief, beads, and woggle.

 

And thank you taking Wood Badge. You should enjoy the experience.

 

JFL49

...Beaver...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Relax and have fun. Hopefully you are in a patrol with a good bunch of scouters.

 

 

If anyone ever comes at me with a ruler and attempts measures my patch placement is going to need a Proctologist to get the ruler back.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, the WB course I was on staff last year was told by the CD, even after earning your beads, you can wear the plaid, Troop 1 neckerchief. It is a symbol of service.. initially to the ticket process, but even after the process is complete. The combo of the leather woggle and tartan looks good.

 

I also picked up a green axe & Log necker after the course, with "Troop 1" and the "course name/date" on it. I wear that one occasionally as well.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Hmmm, the WB course I was on staff last year was told by the CD, even after earning your beads, you can wear the plaid, Troop 1 neckerchief. It is a symbol of service.. initially to the ticket process, but even after the process is complete. The combo of the leather woggle and tartan looks good."

 

Sorry, but I don't understand why one would want to wear the participant neckerchief after completing WB and receiving your beads, woggle and WB neckerchief. To me, the WB neckerchief is much more important then the participant neckerchief. My participant neckerchiefs are put away with my WB stuff. The only WB neckerchief I wear is the WB one (reddish tan with square piece of tartan).

 

Wearing the participant neckerchief would give the impression one hadn't completed WB.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speedy's DAD,

 

Greetings!

 

You've heard some excellent advice.

 

The Wood Badge course curriculum is reviewed and edited every few years (major revisions maybe every 10-15 years).

 

In previous courses, under the Wood Badge for Boy Scout Leaders, all participants had to look like a troop. Everyone had to wear the Boy Scout uniform of a Scout, and a participant was usually recommended to bring two shirts. Staffers were recommended to bring three or four shirts. Adult position came off and adult knots came off. Unit numerals were removed and a No 1 numeral had to be sewn on. And if a Scouter was from another neighboring council, the CSP was usually taken off and a new council CSP was placed on.

 

When the BSA training committee updated WB into Wood Badge for the 21st Century, they did away with all the troop identical uniforming. The WB21C Committee decided that the skills that WB teaches is paramount. They still believed in uniforming, but not to the amount that it was bankrupting and driving away some potentially good Scouters.

 

Uniforming is great, and it does have a place in Scouting. In a normal WB course, a participant wont learn their patrol, until after the course has already started and a few lessons into the course. Regarding your course, as long as you are correctly wearing the uniform of your current position, I wouldn't sweat the patrol patch or even sewing it on.

 

Enjoy the class and hopefully your Pack/Troop really benefits!

 

Scouting Forever and Venture On!

Crew21 Adv(This message has been edited by Crew21_Adv)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree the "participant" necker can be worn even after receiving beads.

 

I was truely fortunate enough to be presented my necker and beads which were purchased from Gilwell in England.

 

So... I do not intend to ever put that necker in harms way! I'll wear the plaid one if working or performing something that could damage the tan necker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told it is proper to wear the plaid participant neckerchief during the ticket phase "while actively pursuing your ticket." Since one of my items was to hold the COR position for one year, I wore the necker whenever I was in uniform. Others wore it strictly while engaged in a ticket activity, i.e. day camp leader, merit badge seminar staff, etc.

 

"Wearing the participant neckerchief would give the impression one hadn't completed WB." emb021

 

I agree completely. I put out a lot of effort to finish my ticket. I don't want anyone else coming to me asking, "So how's your ticket coming?"

 

If your new necker/woggle are too precious to wear all the time, just wear the beads. Many of the old timers I see wear their neckers just for "events" and the beads alone for day-to-day uniform wear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"In the olden days" our participant necker was green, with a brown embroidered axe in the log.

 

I still have mine, can't remember the last time I wore it!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's mauve, not tan ;)

 

The only time I wear my Troop 1 neckerchief is during staffing experiences on course. The rest of the time I'm in mauve, woggle and beads. On course until the final closing ceremony, I'm in beads, participant woggle and Troop 1 neck gear.

 

When I first received my Wood Badge, I wore the neck gear to every event, but as time has gone on, I wear the beads mostly, and save the mauve for special occasions and staffing events. Usually we have one Wood Badger that gives "Field Uniform Beads" to people that are animal beads in the shape of their critter as a staff gift, so we even have "class b" beads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear about the class B beads. Not a good example for a staffer to model.

Never heard it called mauve before (even though somewhat accurate). Try Dove Gray.

BDPT00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Wikipedia (that irrefutable source of internet knowledge):

 

"The neckerchief, called a "necker" in British and some Commonwealth Scouting associations, is a standard triangular scarf made of cotton or wool twill with a taupe face and red back...."

 

And if you look up taupe (pronounced 'toʊp') you'll find nine different colors ranging from gray to purple.

 

Personally, I liked the "critter beads" except when getting a hug from an Eagle staffer and the little beaks jammed into my sternum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, let's try this (from Scoutneckers.com)

 

Gilwell Park was donated by Mr deBois Maclaren in 1919, to the Chief Scout of the World, Lord Baden Powell to be used as a camping ground for London Scouts. A permanent Training Camp for leaders became named after Gilwell, and today the word "Gilwell" has come to be used internationally as meaning adult training in Scouting.

 

Officially, the scarf is dove-grey on the outside and warm red on the inside. These colours are used to signify humility and warmth. The apex of the scarf has a small swatch of Maclaren Tartan, reminding us of the kind gesture made by Mr deBois Maclaren.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...