Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'virginia'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome to SCOUTER Forum
    • New to the Forum?
    • Forum Support & Announcements
    • New to Scouting?
  • Open Discussion - Program
    • Open Discussion - Program
  • News & Politics
    • Issues & Politics
  • Unit Fundraising
    • Unit Fundraising
  • Order of the Arrow
    • Order of the Arrow
  • The Patrol Method
    • The Patrol Method
  • Cub Scouts
    • Cub Scouts
  • Wood Badge and Adult Leader Training
    • Wood Badge and adult leader training
  • Advancement Resources
    • Advancement Resources
  • Patch Trading Central
    • Patch Trading Central
  • Working with Kids
    • Working with Kids
  • Uniforms
    • Uniforms
  • Camping & High Adventure
    • Camping & High Adventure
  • Girl Scouting
    • Girl Scouting
  • Summer Camp
    • Summer Camp
  • Scouting Around the World
    • Scouting Around the World
  • Council Relations
    • Council Relations
  • Venturing Program
    • Venturing Program
  • Scouting History
    • Scouting History
  • Scouting the Web
    • Scouting the Web
  • Scoutmaster Minutes
    • Scoutmaster Minutes

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Occupation


Interests


Biography


AIM


MSN


Website


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype

Found 7 results

  1. In late 2019, the Board of the Stonewall Jackson Area Council (SJAC) chose to abandon the name of their council that had been a powerful banner to Scouting in central Virginia since 1927. Now in light of this transition (either welcomed or not by current scouters, boosters, and onlookers), I think it appropriate to ....read here
  2. Over the past few months I've posted essays about regional Scouting history and have gotten away from historical accounts of Orange Troop No. 1. I am taking this opportunity to return to Orange Troop No. 1 material, focusing on two long term encampments outside of the Town of Orange, Virginia in the two years following the Troop's formation in 1915. Keep Reading Here...
  3. Boy Scout Camp Shenandoah, in it’s most recent iteration (and location since 1950), presently consists of 456 acres near Swoope in Augusta County on the eastern slopes of Virginia’s Appalachian Plateau. This site is the permanent location of the Scout camp for the Stonewall Jackson Area Council. However, few realize that “Camp Shenandoah” has been serving the youth of the region many more years and has a much deeper and richer history that extends back to the early part of the twentieth century. This essay will explore the first renditions of Camp Shenandoah at its original location at Island Ford, Virginia, before it’s ownership by the Stonewall Jackson (Area) Boy Scout council, and how it became synonymous with serving the recreational needs of the youth of the Shenandoah Valley and beyond. read more here
  4. Beginning in February 1927, Charles E. Wood, Special Deputy Regional Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), along with the Charlottesville Rotary Club led the effort to establish the Lewis and Clark Area Boy Scout Council #599 in Albemarle and the adjacent counties. Continue Reading Here...
  5. The April 14, 1911 edition of the Staunton Dispatch-News (Staunton, Virginia) ascribed a unique status onto a local young woman by the name of Josephine B. Timberlake. Ms. Timberlake was heralded as the organizer of the first Scout troop in the city and noted as the first (and only) female troop organizer in the Commonwealth of Virginia and possibly the nation. Keep Reading Here... Are there other examples of female Scoutmasters or Assistant Scoutmasters from the first decade of American Scouting?
  6. In the mid-1960s in Orange, Virginia, public facilities and social activities were separated by color. Black children and teens were commonly excluded from the same amenities that whites freely enjoyed access to. In the realm of recreation, black children had to adapt and be creative to enjoy many of the same sports as whites. For instance, a cow pasture became a baseball field or an empty street with a home-made hoop on a pole became a basketball court. However a unifying presence in the lives of blacks in Orange was the Church. The Church provided organization and opportunity that general society did not. This was the era of Vietnam, Civil Rights, and separation in education. Traditional black sections in and around the Town of Orange were; Little Petersburg, Little Zion, Church Street, and Lindsey Drive among others. In what certainly was a reaction to the prevailing social conditions, a group of thoughtful black community members decided in the fall of 1967 to organize Orange County’s only black Boy Scout troop (Troop No. 111). continue reading this essay at: https://historyofscoutinginorange.wordpress.com/2019/02/05/at-the-end-of-the-segregation-era-a-black-boy-scout-troop-in-orange-virginia/
  7. rayezell_2000

    Early Scouting in Central Virginia

    Perfected Under his Leadership–Scoutmaster Rev. Frank C. Riley The second (and maybe most renown) Scoutmaster of Orange Troop No. 1 was Rev. Frank C. Riley. Riley was born September 27, 1888 in Baltimore, Maryland and graduated from Crozer Baptist Theological Seminary (B. Div.) in Chester, Pennsylvania, and from the University of Pennsylvania (M.A.), both in 1915. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Richmond College (University of Richmond). He was ordained in September 1913 at Lee Street Church in Baltimore, and this congregation previously granted him a “License to Preach” in 1908 (Anonymous 1918; Riley 1995). He was an acclaimed football player while at Richmond College and his other educational stops (Maxwell 1922; Riley 1995). In 1913, Riley taught advanced Greek at McGuires University School in Richmond (Riley 1995). Riley was called as the pastor of Orange Baptist Church on November 14, 1915, and served there until late 1930 (with a year’s leave of absence during World War I from 1918-1919) (McColley 1987; Riley 1995). Read more at: https://historyofscoutinginorange.wordpress.com/2019/01/25/perfected-under-his-leadership-scoutmaster-rev-frank-c-riley/
×